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People who speak American Sign Language (ASL) or Braille often find themselves out of the mainstream when it comes to exposure to the languages they “speak” or “read.” Since deaf people cannot hear as well as the rest of us or at all, they rely on signs instead of sounds to guide them through life.

The same applies to those with vision problems. They need to be able to feel the words before they can understand them, and if there are no Braille documents available, they may not be able to read the information.

Now, people can purchase special printers, embossed printer ink, and special paper on which Braille can be written or printed. However, it’s not enough for someone to type and print out the embossed words. Those with vision problems need a Braille font so that the letters on the paper can be felt and understood.

For people who are neither blind nor deaf but interested to learn Braille or American Sign Language, the learning process will be much faster when they are able to see what the characters look like. Typing in different sentences and printing them out in American Sign Language or Braille allows people to visualize the connection between words and symbols, making it easier to memorize the fonts.

American Sign Language Fonts
Lapiak ASL – Free for Windows, Mac OS, Linux
Mini Pics ASL - For Windows, Mac OS
Galludet ASL Font – Free for Windows, Mac OS
ASL Gallaudet True Type – Free for Windows, Mac OS
Sutton ASL Fonts – Free for Windows, Mac OS
Galludet by David Rakowski – Free for Windows, Mac OS, Linux
Handstand by Aldo Silva – Free for Windows, Mac OS

Braille Fonts
Braille Fonts – Free for Windows, Mac OS
Braille 3D by Philippe Blondel – Free for Windows, Mac OS, Linux
Balkan Peninsula Braille Font – Free for Windows, Mac OS, Linux
6- and 8-Dot Braille Font – Free for Windows, Mac OS


This was written by Clickinks.com, your home for printer inks and laser toner.