The Clickinks Blog | remanufactured

Remanufactured Ink Cartridges for Printers

As inkjet technology has evolved, and demand has increased for professional looking prints, inkjet printer cartridges from the original manufacturer have become in some cases rather expensive and for a small number of accurate prints. At the same time consumers overall have been satisfied with the value of their printer, but less so their printer in cartridges. Many manufacturers have emerged to provide remanufactured ink jet cartridges for popular brands of inkjet prints, such as Hewlett-Packard, Epson, Canon, Brother, and others.

Remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges began as small companies selling replacement ink and leaving the consumer to refill the cartridge but today is a much more common business, and the consumer doesn’t need to buy strange systems that refill the cartridge. Many large companies, and also public programs provide for ways for consumers to dispose of original inkjet printer cartridges in such a way that they can be refilled and recycled. This results not only in being friendly to the environment but also in savings for consumers who can then buy remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges at a reduced price. Similarly for laser printers there exists remanufactured toner cartridges.

While once branded as being lower quality, the remanufactured inkjet cartridges for printers of today in most cases offer same, or similar quality to those provided by original inkjet cartridges. A savvy consumer can save a lot of money with an affordable price that offers quality, even at cheap prices, for those on a budget. 

Many consumers often prefer ink, and cartridges from original manufacturers, but for many, remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges from clickinks serve day-to-day printing needs. Also ordering online can save consumers money because, even though there is sometimes a cost for delivery, buying inkjet printer cartridges in bulk can result in substantial savings. 

Even when buying a modest supply, it is worth investigating whether remanufactured inkjet cartridges compatible with one’s printer, at a low price, can outweigh the perceived benefit of inkjet printer cartridges purchased from the original manufacturer. For consumers looking for deals, whether it be low volume or high volumes, remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges are a seriously compelling option, which consumers can consider when replacing the inkjet printer cartridges which were supplied with their printer, or those purchased from the original manufacturer of their printer.

The Home and Business Printer Glossary

Have you ever shopped for a printer wondering if you should pay extra for “PictBridge”? Shopped for an ink cartridge and gotten confused by the difference between “OEM” and “Remanufactured Cartridge”?  Or spoken to a graphic designer and felt clueless what the “pantone” in your print job was?  In an effort to assist with all your printer needs, we have assembled this Printer Glossary below.  Feel free to print and bookmark for reference.

All-in-One (AIO) - This is a multifunction printer that can also scan and copy. Many of these devices can send and receive faxes as well. These are sometimes referred to as multi function printers.

Anti-Aliasing - The process of removing or reducing the jagged distortions in curves and diagonal lines so that lines appear smooth or smoother.

Auto Answer - This is a setting on most fax machines, fax modems and multifunction devices with fax capability. With auto answer, the device automatically picks up incoming fax calls after a specified number of rings.

Automatic Document Feeder - A tray and/or attachment that feeds one page at a time into a fax, copier, printer, or scanner.

Bit - The abbreviation for binary digit; the smallest unit of digital information, represented by 1 or 0. Computers use many bits to represent information.

Bit Depth - A digital image is represented as a bit-map (a grid of dots). Bit Depth is the number of color tones that can be associated with each dot. A 1-bit color, for example, can only contain 2 colors: black and white. But an 8-bit color contains 256 shades (color or gray), while a 24-bit color contains 16.7 million shades.

Bitmap File - The standard graphics format carries the file extension .BMP.

Borderless Printing - Printing photos with no white space around the edges. Borderless prints look like the high quality prints from a photo lab.

Brightness - An adjustment to control the lightness and darkness of an image, measured by the percentage of reflected light.

Broadcast Faxing - A fax machine feature found on most all-in-ones that sends the same fax documents to multiple recipients.

Carriage - The fixture in the print device that holds the print head. Generally travels along carriage rods from side to side.

Central Processing Unit (CPU) – This is the portion of a computer system that carries out the instructions of a computer program, and is the primary element carrying out the computer's functions. The central processing unit carries out each instruction of the program in sequence, to perform the basic arithmetical, logical, and input/output operations of the system.

Centronics - A pioneering American manufacturer of computer printers now remembered primarily for the parallel interface and printer cable that bears its name. These cables are often referred to as Centronics cables.

Charging Roller - One of the complex systems of rollers inside a typical laser printer or all-in-one. The charging roller transfers an electrical charge to the photo conductor, which repels particles to the toner.

CMYK - An acronym to represent cyan, magenta, yellow and black, the basic colorants (dyes, pigments or toners) used in digital imaging. These four colors alone are used to create all colors in an image.

Collation - A feature offered on some inkjet printers, laser printers and all-in-ones. With collation turned on, multiple copies of a document are printed as separate documents.

Compatible Cartridges - A brand new printer cartridge that is made by a third party, not the OEM by the original printer manufacturer.  Compatible cartridges are widely known as a trusted, affordable option.

Contrast Enhancement (Automatic) - Automatically brightens images that appear dark or hazy, and applies appropriate tone correction to deliver improved quality and clarity.

Corona Wires - A set of thin wires inside the body of a laser printer that transfers a static charge to each sheet of paper; this charge in turn attracts the toner to the paper.

Dedicated Print Server - A computer in a network dedicated to managing all available printers.

Dot Matrix - An older impact printer that used a grid of tiny pins to transfer ink from a ribbon to the page. Dot matrix printers can produce basic graphics, but have inferior print quality compared to inkjet or laser printers.

Dots Per Inch (DPI) - A measurement of print resolution. DPI indicates how many individual dots a device can address on a page per square inch of area. DPI is typically listed as horizontal resolution by vertical resolution.

Driver - Software that comes with a peripheral that allows the peripheral to communicate with the computer.

Duplex - Printing both sides of a two-sided document on a single sheet of paper.

Drum unit - The photoreceptor in a laser printer which is electrically charged, rotating and  coated with organic photo conductors.  The drum picks up toner and then prints the image onto paper by direct contact and heat, which fuses the ink to the paper.

Enhanced Capability Port (ECP) - This is an international specification describing bidirectional communications using a computer's parallel port. ECP focuses on printers and scanners.

Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) - An international standard documenting bidirectional communications using a computer’s parallel port. EPP focuses on peripherals other than printers and scanner.

Ethernet Network - The simplest, slowest and least expensive network design, usually well-suited for home or small offices.

Fax Forwarding - A fax feature that enables the machine to automatically forward any document it receives to another fax.

Fax Header - An informational line of text printed at the top of every page by a fax machine; it includes a name, station ID and fax number.

FireWire - High-speed external connection used for connecting peripherals, also referred to as "IEEE 1394".

Firmware - Low-level software that runs in a digital camera, printer, scanner, etc. and controls the product's operation and user interface.

Font - A set of printing characters that share the same distinctive appearance. Fonts are used on a computer to display text on the monitor and print documents.

Fuser Roller - One of a system of rollers inside a laser printer. The fuser roller heats the page after the toner is applied, so the toner partially melts and sticks to the page for a permanent bond.

GIF Image - Short for Graphics Interchange Format; usually carries the file extension .GIF. The first truly universal standard format for file images, originally developed by CompuServe. Widely used on the web, GIF files are best used for small images in limited colors.

IEEE-1284 Standard - The international design specification for bidirectional parallel printer cables. Most inkjet and laser printers do not work properly unless the printer cable meets this specification. Most products now use USB for printer-to-computer communication.

Impact Printer - A class of printer that uses the force of an impact into an ink ribbon to create a printed character on a page. This impact is delivered by a rotating ball or wheel or through a grid of pins. This type of printer is generally slow, noisy and out-dated. These printers are useful for multipart forms such as invoices or shipping bills.

Individual Ink Cartridges (IIC) - Some inkjet manufacturers printing solution that has a different ink cartridge for each color.

InfraRed (IR) - This is a type of connection that allows data to be wirelessly transmitted from one device directly to another device when the infrared window on the camera is lined up with an infrared sensor on the other device. This technology is similar to what most TV remote controls use.

Inkjet Cartridge - An inkjet cartridge is a replaceable component of an inkjet printer that contains the liquid ink (and sometimes a print head, micro-chip and other technology and moving parts).


Inkjet Printer - A printer or an all-in-one unit that shoots fast-drying ink through tiny nozzles onto a page to form characters. The inkjet is currently the standard for personal computer printing. Inkjets are fast, affordable and quiet. They provide high-quality graphics and print in color.

Input/Output Card - Usually abbreviated I/O card. A standard computer adapter card that typically provides two serial ports for your modem and two parallel printer ports.

Interrupt Request - Usually abbreviated IRQ. A signal generated by an adapter card in the computer that alerts the CPU to handle incoming data from the keyboard, mouse, serial port or parallel port.

JPEG File - Usually carries the file extension .JPG. The current favorite image format among web surfers and graphics professionals, JPEG images are highly compressed to save more space than a .BMP or .GIF file.

Label Stock - A paper sheet carrying peel-off or perforated labels that are arranged in a specified pattern.

Landscape Printing - Printing where the longer length of the page runs from side to side rather than top to bottom. Landscape mode is often used to print spreadsheets and larger photographs.

Large-format Printer - An inkjet printer designed to handle paper sizes of 11x17 inches or larger. Some large-format printers also use continuous rolls of paper. These printers are generally designed to produce photo-quality posters, blueprints, maps, banners and signs.

Laser Printer – This is a device that uses static electricity and heat to bond particles of toner to the page to create the characters. This is the same technology used by many copy machines and is known as a best option for large businesses.

Local Area Network (LAN) - A group of computers in an office or building connected to one another by cabling. A network computer can access files on other computers in the network or enable others to open and use its files. Printers, modems and hard drives are also typically shared peripherals on a network.

Media - The material that the ink is printed upon, such as plain paper, mailing labels or transparency film.

Monochrome Printer - A printer that prints in only one color, usually black. Some monochrome printers can also produce text and graphics in shades of gray, as well as strict black-and-white.

Network Interface Card (NIC) - An adapter card installed in a computer that enables it to connect to a network; most NICs support several different types of networks and network cabling.

Network Printer – This is a printer available for use by all of the workstations on a network. A network printer either has its own built-in network interface card or it is connected to a printer server on the network.

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) - Products or components that are manufactured or purchased by a company and retailed under that company's brand name.

Page Description Language - A language recognized by computers and printers that define the physical characteristics of a page, including fonts, graphics, margins, spacing and colors.

Page Memory - The number of pages a fax can hold in its memory if it runs out of paper.

Pages Per Minute (PPM) - A measurement of printer speed, indicating how many finished pages a printer can produce over a 60 second period. PPM speeds are typically listed for both black-only and mixed text and color documents.

Page Storage – This is the number of pages (text or graphics) that can be stored internally on the given device.

Pantone - A color matching system supported by most desktop publishing and graphics design software.

Paper Capacity - Refers to how much paper the printer tray can accommodate.

Paper Guides - Adjustable plastic dividers that help hold paper in the proper alignment in a printer's paper feed tray. These guides can be moved to fit different dimensions, such as international sizes, envelopes or custom-sized paper.

Parallel Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. I/O adapter cards are available that can provide a computer with up to four separate parallel ports, but most computers come with one as standard equipment.

Peripheral - This is a device attached to a host computer, but not part of it, and is more or less dependent on the host. It expands the host's capabilities, but does not form part of the core computer architecture.

Peer-to-Peer Network - A simple network design that uses no file or printer servers. All workstations on the network are connected by cabling, which enables users to share files and hardware, such as printers.

PictBridge - PictBridge allows digital cameras, camcorders and other image-capture devices to connect and print directly to photo printers and other output devices; no computer is required.

Pixel - A single element within a digital photograph. The typical digital photograph is made up of several million pixels.

Port Connection - A communication link between hardware components. Types of connections include FireWire, Parallel, USB, Serial, and SCSI.

Port Polling - A procedure performed by Windows® each time the computer is booted and each time a print job is sent from an application. The operating system automatically checks the parallel port to make sure that a printer is ready to receive a print job. In many cases, port polling can be turned off to improve printing speed.

Print Buffer - A separate, standalone print spooler with its own built-in memory that connects a computer and printing hardware. The print buffer can spool print jobs, freeing up all of a computer's resources for applications.

Printer Cartridge - The device that integrates the print head, ink container and ink delivery systems.  A printer cartridge may contain ink or toner.

Printer Driver - The software that enables the operating system to properly build and format commands and data bound for the printer; in effect, a printer driver tells the operating system all it needs to know to successfully operate the printer.

Printer Emulation - This is software that enables a newer printer to act like an older, widely used printer so it can recognize and print documents formatted for that older model.

Printer Server - A computer solely dedicated to supporting a network printer. The server's system RAM and hard drive are used to store print jobs in the queue, and print jobs can be reordered, paused, or deleted from the server's keyboard.

Print Head - This is the element of a printer that applies the ink to the paper. In an inkjet device, the print head contains the nozzles and electronics that control the ejection of the ink onto the selected media.

Print Quality - A qualitative description of how pleasing printed output looks. Most printers enable the user to adjust the quality of print and the speed of printing. In general for inkjet printers, slower print speeds will result in higher print quality.

Print Resolution - The quantity of data capable of being printed, typically measured in dots per inch (DPI). Higher resolution is one of many factors that can improve print quality.

Queue - A sequence of documents sent to a printer to be processed sequentially, usually in the order in which they were sent by the computer.

Remanufactured Cartridge - ClickInks.com’s remanufactured cartridges are made from recycled cartridge cores. Each cartridge is cleaned, inspected and refilled to conform to strict ISO 9001 quality standards and meet or exceed OEM specifications. Remanufactured cartridges from ClickInks.com contain the same amount of ink or more as the OEM ink cartridges, and print the same number of pages.  Remanufactured cartridges are widely recognized as a more affordable and environmentally friendly option, keeping empty cartridges out of landfills

Serial Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. This is a physical interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time.

Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) - Set of standards for physically connecting and transferring data between computers and peripheral devices.

Thermal Dye Sublimation - In dye-sublimation printing, the dyes vaporize and permeate the glossy surface of the paper before they return to solid form, creating a gentle gradation at the edges of each pixel. The color infuses the paper and is less vulnerable to fading and distortion over time.

Tri-Chamber Cartridge – This is a descriptive term for a singular inkjet cartridge that contains all three colors of ink; cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY).  Often marketed as a tri-color cartridge.

Universal Serial Bus (USB) - A fast input/output (I/O) data transfer standard used for connecting peripherals to a computer. Typically, each device connected to a computer uses its own port. USB can connect up to 127 peripherals through a single port, and peripherals can be connected together. USB devices may be hot swapped, which means that power does not have to be turned off to connect or disconnect a peripheral. USB has become the primary means of connection for printers and other peripherals, and is supported by most major hardware, software and telecommunications providers.

Will that New Printer Save your Green backs?

Go Green today, not just because it is St. Patrick’s Day, but because the green is a reminder of our Earth friendly ways that, on some level, we all strive for. Even as we aim to recycle and keep loads out of the landfill, there has been an urge lately to buy more printers, throwing perfectly functioning printers in the trash all in the name of saving on ink.

When inside an office supply chain, you may have looked at the high retail prices of your ink or toner cartridges, and then looked at the sale price of a new printer. Don’t let it fool you, if it seems too good to be true – it probably is.

HP, Epson and other printer manufacturers are guilty of this; they sell the printers at low prices, with nothing more than a starter cartridge included, and then increase the price of the subsequent cartridges. By encouraging consumers to buy a new printer, they are creating a lot of unnecessary environmental waste.

The solution is to keep your printer out of the landfill and keep more of your money in pocket. Purchase remanufactured (professionally refilled and recycled) ink cartridges from a reputable company like Clickinks.com. Your printer, wallet and grandchildren will thank you.

Ink Plot

14. January 2010 12:09 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, ink plot, remanufactured, lexmark  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
I don't know if you've heard of Lexmarks shrill attempts to kill the remanufactured ink market - but they include suing their own customers. It is with this in mind that I have written this bit of fiction.

Part II to follow...Enjoy!


The security guard found the footfall of the Expert reassuring. His soles pressed the linoleum as though the tiles were something to be owned: each step were as a grandfather clock striking the hour. Bong – the glass door has closed behind the Expert. Bong – he was at the reception, removing his sunglasses as he faced the guard.

“Thank goodness you’re here,” the guard said. “We wouldn’t have called, but it’s an emergency –“

“Not to worry,” the Expert said. He wiped the lenses of his sunglasses upon his lapel. He raised them to the sun and narrowed his eyes. Were they satisfactorily clean? Most certainly. He propped the sunglasses upon his nose. “What exactly is the problem?”

“Well –“ the guard hesitated and closed his mouth. He resembled a goldfish that finds itself on the wrong side of the tank, caught in the hungry embrace of the family cat.

For a moment it seemed that the will to live would fail him entirely, but then he breathed deeply. He pointed to the door marked ‘Security’ and said “It would be easier to show you.”

“Let’s go.”

He and the Expert soon faced a blank monitor. The arms of the Expert were folded: the two limbs put a steel-reinforced concrete wall between him and whatever the guard would show him. He wore a grimace in anticipation.

“You’re ready?”

And when the Expert nodded, a button’s press brought the screen to life. It showed a still image – security footage of the printer room. It was like any company’s printer room.

The guard ringed a printer in the corner of the screen with his finger.

“Watch this,” he said and, though he still wore the expression of an asphyxiated fish, he sounded like a child in the early hours, following a visit from Father Christmas.

Another press, and the video began. The hum of a VHS tape playing fell into the silence. At first the printer room was still, but then an obese man in overalls heaved through the door. He swaggered – not because he seemed self-assured but because his bulk compelled him.

The sound of struggle up three flights of stairs piped through the monitor’s speakers. The man pressed the door shut with what might once have been hips, turning his back so it faced the camera. The word ‘Janitor’ could be read on his overalls.

Then he faced the printer the guard had ringed.

“Here,” the guard said.

From the pocket of his overalls the janitor took an ink cartridge. He lifted the hood of the printer.

“What brand is that?” the Expert asked.

“Lexmark,” the guard said. “And we understand that he’s not holding an official cartridge.

“That can’t be good,” the Expert mused. He pressed his arms more tightly against his chest, adding another layer of concrete between himself and the events of screen. Then he was quiet.

The janitor had removed the exhausted cartridge, splattering his hands in the process. He wiped the ink against his overalls, and his groan became a hacking cough that ended in the excavation of phlegm from his throat. “Hrergh” he said warmly. The empty cartridge stood on the table: there could be no doubt it was a Lexmark product.

“Hrergh,” the janitor repeated, and the monitor’s speakers vibrated. His breathing had slowed but he continued to inhale with gusto – his audience couldn’t miss a thing. Satisfied that the transfer of ink from his fingertips to his clothes was complete, the janitor reached his hand into the Lexmark to insert the new cartridge. He fiddled until he heard the all-important click – the cartridge was installed.

As though the force of gravity had then increased a hundred fold, the printer’s hood came down. The janitor yanked his arm away, only to discover his hand was gone.

It was still in the Lexmark.

He stared at the printer. The plastic was a benign grey, and the touch screen electric blue. The machine’s hum brought to mind the song of a man with a clean conscience.

He fainted. The tape ended.

The Expert nodded. “I see why it’s best that you showed me,” he said.

“We’re thinking of putting it on YouTube,” the guard said. “Our marketing people think it might go viral.”

“Okay. So why am I here?”

“Isn’t it obvious? It’s these ridiculous ink cartridge controls Lexmark have in place. They charge so much for their official cartridges – and it doesn’t make sense to pay what they’re asking when there are great quality compatibles for a lower price.”

“I see, I see. So you want me to…?”

“Yes,” the guard said. He pressed a button and the monitor was dead again. For a moment the image of the felled janitor was an echo against the black; then it was gone. “You must challenge the Lexmark. Conquer the in-built cartridge controls so we don’t have to hire a new janitor every time we use a compatible. Can you do this?”

The Expert spoke with the assurance of a man safe from bombs inside his steel bunker.

“Yes,” he said. “Let’s do it.”

HP Printer Ink More Costly Than Human Blood














Are you sick to death of the outrageous prices HP charge for their original black ink cartridges? You might avoid paying through the nose by purchasing from a remanufactured ink vendor. Or, if you’re hopelessly attached to the contents of the wallet, you might print documents with your own blood.

This, according to a bar chart created by Clementine at ReflectionOf.Me, is almost half the price of HP black ink # 45. All you need is an emptied ink cartridge and a blood donor pack. That woozy sensation you’re feeling as you fill the cartridge? That, dear reader, is what saving feels like - glorious, glorious savings.

Looking for details before you undertake this (admittedly drastic) procedure? HP’s black ink retails for $0.70 per mL, as opposed to $0.40 per mL for human blood. Need some liquid courage before you start? That’s no problem, because according to the bar chart, vodka retails for almost nothing. And if the whole thing goes wrong and you find yourself in the hospital – that’s okay too, because penicillin is only $0.05 per mL.

So get printing – and who knows? Before long HP might unveil its new ‘Vampire’ series.

Judge Rules against Lexmark in Court Case

1. December 2009 13:28 by Danielle Bernhard in print news, OEM, compatible ink, remanufactured, lexmark  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Print News: Judge Rules on Lexmark Remanufactured Ink Court Case

Recently a seven year court battle between Lexmark and a North Carolina-based company that enables compatible ink cartridges reached its final ruling. In December 2002, Lexmark sued Static Control Components for infringing on a computer program contained in its ink cartridges that made the printer inoperable, if it were found to be operating through ink cartridges refilled by companies other than Lexmark itself. Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove ruled that their circumvention of Lexmark’s chip does not violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, meaning that the manufacturer may continue its activities.

The case originated in part because of the Lexmark Return Program: an initiative where consumers who sent their emptied cartridges, like the Lexmark 28A, back to Lexmark, instead of third-party businesses, received a substantial discount on future purchases. Supplementing this program with consumers, Lexmark programmed their ink cartridges to become inoperable if the ink cartridge refill occurred outside Lexmark’s premises. The program undercut the remanufacturing industry, which depends on empty cartridges, and resulted in fewer Lexmark cartridges getting recycled.

Static Control Components, a business that doesn’t itself sell compatible ink cartridges, but makes microchips for the remanufacturing industry, responded to Lexmark with the production of a ‘Smartek’ program that nullifies Lexmark’s restrictions. The chip included its own version of Lexmark’s ‘Toner Loading Program’. The company began shipping its microchip in 2002.

Lexmark’s lawsuit against the company was filed on the premise that the North Carolina-company had copied its ‘Toner Loading Program,’ and had violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Introduced in May 2001, this legislation was meant to protect the intellectual property of persons creating in a primarily digital medium. It is notable that Lexmark could not sue them for countermanding an initiative designed to undercut its competitors in the remanufacturing circuit, since this would violate competition laws. Lexmark’s attempts to prevent compatible ink cartridges from being produced through another manufacturers chip amounts to the same thing.

After a prolonged court battle extending not only from the Federal Court of Kentucky but the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, it has now been ruled that Lexmark’s ‘Toner Loading Program’ does not amount to copyright-able property. Rather, the DMCA was meant to protect creative expression in film and music mediums and cannot be easily applied to a computer program or printer cartridge. Today’s decision amounts to a victory for the remanufacturing industry, which has enjoyed a contentious relationship with major brands while recycling ink cartridges.

Recycle, Refill, Reuse: How printer ink is going green

Recycle, Refill, Reuse: How printer ink is going green

There is a great push these days to recycle every product before discarding. Recycling saves natural resources, conserving land, it saves energy, due to a reduction in energy required, recycling also creates less air and water pollution and fortunately saves money, as recycled products are frequently the least expensive option.

Auto makers offer Certified Used vehicles and Electronic stores offer previously returned, refurbished items. These solutions provide a lower priced alternative for the average consumer. The technology of printer cartridges has also followed suit.

Companies such as Clickinks.com have adopted this “green” way of reusing and saving money by offering printer cartridges that have been used, refilled and have been certified to be good as new, equal in performance to new and ready to be reused. These cartridges are called remanufactured ink or remanufactured toner cartridges. With the exception of a lower cost, you may never know a cartridge was remanufactured. The benefit to consumers is a lower cost with equal performance for Quality, Certified technology.


So what is "remanufactured"?

A remanufactured ink or toner cartridge is offered on just about all printer lines from home photo printers to large business laser jet printers. They have been used and recycled, then put through a rigorous remanufacturing process to bring them back to "same as new" condition and performance.


What is the difference between remanufactured and refurbished products?

The distinction between remanufactured and refurbished equipment is not always obvious. For example, at Clickinks.com remanufactured cartridges are returned to the equivalent of new and carry a satisfaction guarantee. Refurbished or used equipment is generally not fully tested or certified to meet like-new standards. Purchasing a remanufactured cartridge from a reputable company offers the peace of mind afforded by a new product at a 75-86% discount over new.

How is a product remanufactured?

Remanufactured ink and toner cartridges undergo a rigorous process after they have been recycled they are professionally cleaned, thoroughly inspected and completely refilled (with more ml. of ink than manufactures sell them with). Reputable companies will comply with ISO 9001 quality standards.

When is remanufactured better?

If your budget is as limited as the rest of us, then remanufactured ink or toner cartridges will offer you a high quality, fully guaranteed solution at a low cost.

If you are concerned with the environment and want to conserve Earth’s valuable resources, then remanufactured printer cartridges will offer you peace of mind.

Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act

Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (Public Law 93-637) is a U.S. Federal law. It is the statute that governs warranties on consumer products.

Legally, this is a law that states that "No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumer's using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade or corporate name".

The Act provides that any company warranting a product to a consumer by means of a written warranty must disclose, fully and conspicuously, in simple and easy to understand language, the terms and conditions of the warranty according to the rules set forth by the Federal Trade Commission.

Contrary to what manufacturers may lead you to believe, warrantors cannot require that only brand name parts be used with any product. This practice, commonly referred to as "tie-in sales" or "tying agreements", is frequently mentioned in the context of computer and printer parts.

No manufacturer will be allowed to void your warranty simply because you use a remanufactured or compatible part that is produced by someone other than the manufacturer. Purchasing aftermarket parts and consumables (like gasoline or printer cartridges) is more efficient and ultimately gives a better deal to the consumer.

Remanufactured and compatible printer cartridges, as well as brand name products, are sold at Clickinks.com, providing consumers an intelligent way to save money on consumables.

Clickinks Is Excited to Soon Unveil Epson Remanufactured Ink Cartridges!

25. August 2009 14:03 by Danielle Bernhard in recycle cartridges, epson ink, recycle, remanufactured  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)
Clickinks.com will soon unveil Epson remanufactured ink cartridges!

Many of the most popular, effective ink and toner cartridges that Clickinks currently offers are remanufactured products, helping homes and offices reduce their environmental impact.

Clickinks Remanufactured ink and toner cartridges are cost-effective and high quality; they result in lower waste, fewer chemicals, lower energy use and fewer materials. Each remanufactured cartridge keeps pounds of metal and plastic out of landfills and saves gallons of oil.

Clickinks remanufactured ink and toner cartridges come with a 100% no-risk, quality guarantee, and are much more affordable than the original brand OEM ink cartridges.

As we transition our Epson ink and toner cartridges to the environmentally-preferable products, Clickinks will attempt to keep the lowest prices possible, while delivering you the highest quality. Rest assured that you will continue to find a significant savings over OEM ink cartridges.

Please join Clickinks in supporting the transition to a greener Earth.

Have you heard of remanufactured ink cartridges?

19. April 2009 13:29 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, cheap ink, recycle, remanufactured  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
ClickInks.com offers remanufactured ink cartridges for your printer, providing an environmentally friendly solution at 86% off of the original brand name cartridge's retail price.



Our professionally remanufactured cartridges go through a rigorous testing & QA process, to ensure there is no difference in quality from genuine cartridges. Remanufactured cartridges are environmentally friendly, instead of sitting in a landfill, the cartridge cores are recycled and reused after going through our stringent remanufacturing process. All this, at significant savings!



ClickInks.com