The Clickinks Blog | remanufactured toner

Should I buy an Inkjet or Laser Printer?

 
 
The type of printer that is best for you depends greatly on how you plan to use it.  Do you print documents in mass quantities? More than 3 pages a day, or more than 20 pages a week? If so, you it would be worth switching to a laser printer.    
Laser printers also produce high quality text documents, although if you are printing primarily color photos you may want to stick with a good inkjet printer. 
Laser printers have a higher cost initially, and use toner cartridges that are priced higher than most inkjet, however you will notice the toner cartridges have a much higher yield, which will save you time and money in the long run. 
In the Recycler’s article Cost effectiveness of laser versus inkjet discussed David Connett had a good point about duplexing as well, “Some laser printers automatically print on both sides”, which is another time and money saver that you will find in laser printers over inkjet.
Laser toner cartridges can cost around $91, on average, however the laser toner cartridge is able to print 1,500 to 3,500 pages, whereas a standard inkjet cartridge may only costs $23, but only produces approximately 200 pages. Per print you are looking at a significant savings long term with a laser printer.   
You can also find quality remanufactured toner cartridges to easily save up to an additional 50% off those average prices, with no loss in quality to be seen.

Should you buy a Laser Printer? If you are printing documents in high quantity, the answer is a resounding yes.
 

Remanufactured Ink Cartridges for Printers

As inkjet technology has evolved, and demand has increased for professional looking prints, inkjet printer cartridges from the original manufacturer have become in some cases rather expensive and for a small number of accurate prints. At the same time consumers overall have been satisfied with the value of their printer, but less so their printer in cartridges. Many manufacturers have emerged to provide remanufactured ink jet cartridges for popular brands of inkjet prints, such as Hewlett-Packard, Epson, Canon, Brother, and others.

Remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges began as small companies selling replacement ink and leaving the consumer to refill the cartridge but today is a much more common business, and the consumer doesn’t need to buy strange systems that refill the cartridge. Many large companies, and also public programs provide for ways for consumers to dispose of original inkjet printer cartridges in such a way that they can be refilled and recycled. This results not only in being friendly to the environment but also in savings for consumers who can then buy remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges at a reduced price. Similarly for laser printers there exists remanufactured toner cartridges.

While once branded as being lower quality, the remanufactured inkjet cartridges for printers of today in most cases offer same, or similar quality to those provided by original inkjet cartridges. A savvy consumer can save a lot of money with an affordable price that offers quality, even at cheap prices, for those on a budget. 

Many consumers often prefer ink, and cartridges from original manufacturers, but for many, remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges from clickinks serve day-to-day printing needs. Also ordering online can save consumers money because, even though there is sometimes a cost for delivery, buying inkjet printer cartridges in bulk can result in substantial savings. 

Even when buying a modest supply, it is worth investigating whether remanufactured inkjet cartridges compatible with one’s printer, at a low price, can outweigh the perceived benefit of inkjet printer cartridges purchased from the original manufacturer. For consumers looking for deals, whether it be low volume or high volumes, remanufactured inkjet printer cartridges are a seriously compelling option, which consumers can consider when replacing the inkjet printer cartridges which were supplied with their printer, or those purchased from the original manufacturer of their printer.

How does a Laser Printer Work?

22. January 2011 06:00 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, drum unit, laser toner cartridges, laserjet, remanufactured toner  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
You may have a Laserjet printer, or have at least used one, but do you really know how a laser printer works?

In the beginning, the first printers attached to computers were impact printers, typically dot matrix. Everyone understood how these devices worked, as they functioned just like the electric typewriters of the time. A hard object struck an ink ribbon with enough force to transfer the ink onto the page. As technology evolved, along came the next generation, which included inkjet and laser printers. The inkjet printer works just like the name implies; an image is put on the paper by using microscopic jets of ink. The laser printer, on the other hand, is a bit of a mystery. How can a highly focused beam of light impart letters and images on a piece of paper? Is the laser inside my printer dangerous?

Following are the six key processes that happen inside a laser printer when you click print.

Charging: A charge roller (or corona wire in older machines) will project an electrostatic charge onto the photoreceptor. This is a revolving drum or belt which is capable of holding an electrostatic charge on its surface as long as it hasn't been exposed to wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (and will be referred to as drum for the rest of this article).

Writing: A processor chip converts information for scanning onto the drum. The laser is aimed at a series of lenses and mirrors onto the drum. Lasers are used because they generate a coherent beam of light for a high degree of accuracy. Wherever the laser strikes the drum, it reverses the charge, thus creating a latent image on the surface.

Developing: The surface containing the latent image is exposed to toner, which is very fine particles of wax or plastic mixed with coloring agents. The charged toner particles are electrostatically attracted to the drum where the laser wrote the latent image.

Transferring: The drum is pressed or rolled over paper, transferring the image. Higher end machines use a positively charged transfer roller on the back-side of the paper to pull the toner from the photoreceptor to the paper.

Fusing: The paper passes through a fuser assembly, which has rollers that provide heat and pressure that bonds the toner to the paper.

Cleaning: When the print is complete, an electrically neutral rubber blade cleans any excess toner from the drum and deposits it into a waste reservoir, and a discharge lamp removes the remaining charge from the drum.

Each printer applies these steps in different ways. Most laser printers today actually use a linear array of light-emitting diodes to write the light on the drum. The toner is based on either wax or plastic, so that when the paper passes through the fuser assembly, the particles of toner melt. The paper may or may not be oppositely charged. The fuser can be an infrared oven, a heated pressure roller, or a xenon bulb. The warm up process that a laser printer goes through when power is initially applied to the printer consists mainly of heating the fuser element. Many printers have a toner-conservation mode which uses less toner but does yield prints with lower contrast. Color laser printers add colored toner in three additional, yet identical, processes.

So you now know that when you print that document, you are safe from a wayward laser beam melting a hole in your monitor and when it is time to get a replacement for that laser toner cartridge, you need to go to ClickInks.com. With your purchase of our remanufactured toner cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time.

Recycle, Refill, Reuse: How printer ink is going green

Recycle, Refill, Reuse: How printer ink is going green

There is a great push these days to recycle every product before discarding. Recycling saves natural resources, conserving land, it saves energy, due to a reduction in energy required, recycling also creates less air and water pollution and fortunately saves money, as recycled products are frequently the least expensive option.

Auto makers offer Certified Used vehicles and Electronic stores offer previously returned, refurbished items. These solutions provide a lower priced alternative for the average consumer. The technology of printer cartridges has also followed suit.

Companies such as Clickinks.com have adopted this “green” way of reusing and saving money by offering printer cartridges that have been used, refilled and have been certified to be good as new, equal in performance to new and ready to be reused. These cartridges are called remanufactured ink or remanufactured toner cartridges. With the exception of a lower cost, you may never know a cartridge was remanufactured. The benefit to consumers is a lower cost with equal performance for Quality, Certified technology.


So what is "remanufactured"?

A remanufactured ink or toner cartridge is offered on just about all printer lines from home photo printers to large business laser jet printers. They have been used and recycled, then put through a rigorous remanufacturing process to bring them back to "same as new" condition and performance.


What is the difference between remanufactured and refurbished products?

The distinction between remanufactured and refurbished equipment is not always obvious. For example, at Clickinks.com remanufactured cartridges are returned to the equivalent of new and carry a satisfaction guarantee. Refurbished or used equipment is generally not fully tested or certified to meet like-new standards. Purchasing a remanufactured cartridge from a reputable company offers the peace of mind afforded by a new product at a 75-86% discount over new.

How is a product remanufactured?

Remanufactured ink and toner cartridges undergo a rigorous process after they have been recycled they are professionally cleaned, thoroughly inspected and completely refilled (with more ml. of ink than manufactures sell them with). Reputable companies will comply with ISO 9001 quality standards.

When is remanufactured better?

If your budget is as limited as the rest of us, then remanufactured ink or toner cartridges will offer you a high quality, fully guaranteed solution at a low cost.

If you are concerned with the environment and want to conserve Earth’s valuable resources, then remanufactured printer cartridges will offer you peace of mind.