The Clickinks Blog | printer purchase

Iphone printing is now available to everyone

Have you seen the new printing capability from iPhones and other iOS devices? One day I clicked forward and voila I was asked if I wanted to print the email. Why, yes I do, how exciting! Now to get a wireless printer.




















In apps that support printing, such as Mail, Photos and Safari Internet, you will see the option shown to Print. Clicking the Print button brings up another dialog box of printer options, now you will select from the printers found on your wireless network.



















This new printing capability, AirPrint, works with HP’s new line of e-printers. OK the new wireless printer will need to fall into this line. I have also been wanting an all-in-one with scanner, so I can print and save those old photographs. There are many options in the HP eprint line.

HP Envy e-All-in-One series uses #60 Ink
HP Photosmart Plus e-AiO (CN216A) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart Premium e-AiO (CN503A#B1H) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-AiO (C410a) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart e-AiO (CN731A) uses #60 Ink
HP Photosmart eStation (C510) uses #564 Ink
HP LaserJet Pro M1536dnf Multifunction Printer uses #CE278A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CM1415fn Color Multifunction Printer uses #128A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CM1415fnw Color Multifunction Printer uses #128A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CP1525n Color Printer uses #128A Toner

HP LaserJet Pro CP1525nw Color Printer uses #128A Toner
HP Officejet 6500A e-AiO uses #920XL Ink
HP Officejet 6500A Plus e-AiO uses #920XL Ink

HP Officejet 7500A Wide Format e-AiO uses #920XL Ink
HP Officejet Pro 8500A e-AiO uses #940XL Ink
HP Officejet Pro 8500A Plus e-AiO #940XL Ink


I decided on the Photosmart e-All-in-One printer (Model: CN731A), because at an affordable price I was able to get wireless access and an all in one with scanner & copier, plus the HP 60 ink cartridges this printer requires come in remanufactured (better for our environment and my wallet).

Now that I have my new printer in hand I love it. It is a beautiful small, black desktop printer, was easy to set up on my wireless network, worked with Windows XP and Windows 7 and our iPhones automatically connected to it. During the printer setup process you are provided with a personal email address so anyone can email, from anywhere, to your printer.

This must be one of the most convenient printers. I print photos, emails and coupons from my phone and laptop. Anyone can email to the printer, who needs a fax? We never need to wait to print until able to physically connect to the printer.

What type of printer do you use? Feel free to discuss the pros and cons.

Inkjet Wars: Kodak vs HP

Kodak entered the printer market in '07 with a revolutionary business plan: charge slightly more for inkjet printers than other manufacturers, but charge half the price for ink cartridges.

They released the EasyShare 5300: an inkjet with cartridges 50% cheaper than HP’s equivalent model, the PhotoSmart C5180. They launched a full ad campaign, warning consumers that ink cartridges sold by other manufacturers cost more than crude oil.

Moreover, Kodak employed a new pigment-based dying process in their printers, which certified their images for 120 years. This contrasted favorably with the single year guaranteed by Hewlett Packard. Finally, Kodak promised they’d save consumers $110 annually.

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In 2007 Kodak sold 520,000 printers. Impressive? Not really, when you consider that 61 million inkjet multifunction printers were sold that year.

Yet the Kodak entry caused red alert at Hewlett Packard headquarters - both because Kodak aimed a stake at the heart of HP’s business model, and because Kodak targeted the most profitable consumers.

After all, Kodak’s promises of incredible savings wouldn’t mean anything to consumers for whom printers are dusty plastic boxes. It’s the printing maniacs – that 20% of inkjet consumers who purchase 80% of cartridges – with whom Kodak’s new strategy might resonate.

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Since then, the two brands have been firing back and forth at each other. Kodak designed the (possibly Star Trek influenced) printandprosper.com to accompany their EasyShare launch.

This website details the savings available with Kodak, and explains why other printer brands are soulless profit mongers. Hewlett Packard receives the worst beating from this campaign - arguably because the 63 cartridges types available from HP contrast with the 3 from Kodak.

In reply, Hewlett Packard launched The Truth About Printing – a site targeted like a cruise missile at Kodak.

It illustrates an infinite queue of frowning Kodak consumers desperate to return their EasyShares, and promises $50 toward an HP printer. That’s the printing equivalent of removing your gloves.

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More recently, this tussle has moved off the net and into the courts. Last year HP filed a complaint with the lengthily titled National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (his friends call him NAD) that Kodak’s claim to save consumers $110 annually was inaccurate.

Kodak failed even to send a representative to the complaints proceeding. Instead, they released a short press statement saying their advertising claims had already been substantiated.

NAD responded by bundling the case off to the Federal Trade Commission.

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Last December, the FTC decided that Kodak could claim their $110 savings – but on a minimum of four pages printed daily.

This tweaked text recognizes that consumers must guzzle an ink minimum before Kodak’s claims become viable. Kodak has asserted this alteration to their advertising vindicates them.

On the other hand, Hewlett Packard continues firing back. They most recently quoted a Lyra Research report that 50% of consumers never reach Kodak’s savings threshold.

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Who then does provide the cheapest printing? And do Kodak’s (seemingly) lower priced cartridges compromise quality? Comparisons of Kodak and Hewlett Packard’s printers are available through Google, though they report different things.

Broadly speaking – Kodak’s EasyShares give equal quality to HP’s PhotoSmart series, so long as Kodak photo paper is employed. This however cuts the potential savings of Kodak’s ink cartridges. By comparison, the PhotoSmarts offer a more vibrant printout – but degrade quickly.

Therefore neither brand is the undisputed champion of printing – putting to one side the minefield of ink cartridge pricing. The division between Kodak and Hewlett Packard will continue - while the consumer watches on, uncertain.

Scan Documents Straight To Evernote From Your Lexmark Printer

26. February 2010 13:06 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, print news, scanning, printer purchase, iphone, lexmark  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Lexmark has released a fantastic new application for their SmartSolution printers, enabling users to scan documents straight onto the storage website Evernote – without a computer.

The application is designed for 3 wireless Lexmark printers – the Interact, Prestige and Platinum. Straight from paper, documents and images are uploaded to the user’s Evernote account through the web-connected printer, simply with the press of a button.

For those that haven’t heard, Evernote is a storage service for users to capture and retain information through a range of devices. Stored data then remains available through anything connected to the internet.

Previously Evernote was accessible through devices including the iPhone. Lexmark’s application though is the first available for a printer.

For the SmartSolution printers meanwhile, the Evernote app is one of many available. Programs for MSNBC headlines and Google Calendar – alongside 18 others – come packaged with the wireless Lexmarks.

The Evernote app is available to download from Lexmark’s SmartSolution’s website.



Sources
Ben Parr, ‘Evernote Integrates With Lexmark Printers To Sync Your Scans,’ Mashable.com

Xerox Invents Metal Ink For Printable Circuit

A new invention by Xerox researchers will allow electronic circuits to be printed on fabrics and plastics, according to an October 2009 press release from the printing brand. The new conductive silver ink paves the way for e-readers that can be folded like newspapers, or circuits that can be integrated into clothing and worn. It may make redundant the silicon chip, on which electronics have been dependent.


The Xerox silver ink has a uniquely low melting point for a metal, essential for printing on plastics. While normal metals have a melting point of 1,000 degrees, plastic melts at 150 degrees. Yet Xerox’s silver ink melts at 140 degrees, meaning the circuit can be printed, before the plastic is compromised. This opens the way for countless applications. Xerox’s press release for example raises the possibility of pill boxes that can measure their remaining contents, ideal for medication.

Speaking in the press release, Laboratory Manager at the Xerox Research Centre in Canada Paul Smith said: "We've found the silver bullet that could make things like electronic clothing and inexpensive games a reality today. This breakthrough means the industry now has the capability to print electronics on a wider range of materials and at a lower cost."

According to an October 2009 post by Dean Takahashi at VentureBeat.com, the silver ink has been in development at Xerox since 2001. The silver ink enables circuits to be printed like an everyday printer, using an ongoing feed. It doesn’t require the clean rooms necessary for making a silicon chip, and bypasses the cost of production. For the first time, circuits could be almost weightless, integrated into the fabric of a shirt.

Scientists have sought this development for some time: Hewlett Packard for example has been working on plastic electronics since the 1990s. Having created a silver ink viable for commercial use, Xerox intends to “aggressively seek interested manufacturers and developers by providing sample materials to allow them to test and evaluate potential applications.” Expect to see electronic billboard t-shirts before the end of the next decade.

Solar-Powered Road Printer

The device from industrial designers Hoyoung Lee et al. is a good sign for the environment.



Until recently painting a road sign was a hazardous business. The workmen risked giving themselves a terrible posture, what with leaning down to spell words out onto the tarmac surface. Rarely had bending at the knees possessed such immense value.

At worst the work left them in a permanently bent position, unfit to do anything but paint roads!

But thanks to the invention of the solar-powered road printer, now workmen can put those fears behind them. Unveiled on December 18th at EcoFriend.org, the handy (since it doesn’t need hands) device is the work of industrial designers Hoyoung Lee, Doyoung Kim, and Hongju Kim.

The road printer harbors an onboard solar panel with which it powers itself, trundling along as it jet sprays the tarmac. Road signs are pre-programmed into the printer’s memory – right now it can print such classics as the U-Turn and Stop Sign.

The road printer doesn’t even require workmen to bend down to set it going: the buttons have been designed to withstand the steel-capped toe of a boot. Workmen need only replenish the paint reservoir, from which the paint cartridge refills itself.

Of course, the device needs charging – but even then workmen need only leave it sunbathing by the roadside.

The EcoFriend.org article doesn’t state if the road printer is intended for commercial use, or is just conceptual. Yet the device may yet become the No. 1 Christmas gift for workmen looking to be spared a visit to the chiropractor’s office.




For pictures of the solar-powered road printer click: here.

Epson Conquers The Printer Cable With iPhone App

For years the printer cable was a tether by which the computer user was kept in spitting distance of their Epson printer. A slave were they to the length of that copper wire. But no longer. For, according to a December 14th, 2009 press release from Epson, owners of network capable Epson printers, including the Artisan 810 and Workforce 610, will be able to print their images wirelessly. The means of this freedom? Nothing less than Epson’s very own iPrint Application, for use with the iPhone.


The Epson App is available from the iTunes App store, seated alongside similar releases from rival brands. Earlier this year both Hewlett Packard and Canon enabled their customers to cast away their printer cables, so long as they own iPhones. The Apple device comes equipped with a sixth sense, meaning that it’s capable of automatically identifying printers in your network. It does this with WiFi. Yet persons seeking this printing freedom ought beware: according to a December 14th 2009 post by Ragu Magapann at TheStandard.com, the quality of images produced on the iPhone is mediocre.

The Comprehensive Guide to Printer Buying

29. September 2009 13:27 by Danielle Bernhard in find printer, clickinks, new printer, printer purchase, printer buying  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
The Comprehensive Guide to Printer Buying

There are 2 mainstream categories for printers: Laser and Ink jet printers.

When comparison shopping, be sure to look not only at the price of the printer, but also at the availability of affordable ink for the printer. Check a site like Clickinks.com for availability of the specific replacement cartridge. Contrary to what printer manufacturers may say, using remanufactured or compatible cartridges can not void your printer warranty (see Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act). You can estimate the cost per page for any given product. If the cartridge yield is 300 and the price of the cartridges are $30, then you will average 10¢ per page, and if you print about 200 pages a month you are looking at an average $20 per month cost.

Laser printers cost less per page to print, especially if remanufactured toner cartridges are available. Laser printers also print faster and are preferable for heavy printing, such as in a large office. They print better text quality, but inferior photo quality compared to an inkjet printer.

Inkjet printers will use less power than laser printers. Ink, unlike toner powder, can run when fresh off the printer or if it gets wet. There is a low initial cost when purchasing the printer, however printing will cost you more in the long run with the purchase of ink. Inkjet printers are good when used to print photos, and many times feature media card slots to print directly from a digital camera.

Higher resolution (more dots per inch) is a simple way to compare image quality. The standard resolution for laser printers is 600 dpi, and for ink jet is 720 dpi. 720 dpi on an ink jet is an equal, not better resolution, compared to the 600 dpi on laser printers.

If you need to print on heavy stock paper, glossy paper, smaller or larger size paper or would like duplexing (the ability to print on both sides), be sure that the printer can accommodate all of the paper sizes and types you would like to use.

Before buying a printer, check the manufacturer’s web site (i.e. Epson.com) to make sure they provide driver updates and currently offer a driver for your operating system.

No matter what printer category you choose, you will also have the additional option of an All in one (AIO) or Multifunction (MFP) printer. These AIO/MFP offer additional functions such as printer, scanner, copier and fax.

With all of this in mind, you will make an educated buying decision that you will be happy with for years to come.