The Clickinks Blog | print photos

Making Memories: How to Print Your Own Digital Photographs

Taking terrific photos is only half the fun. Those beautiful sceneries and special events, loving family moments and fun times with friends out on the town deserve more than to live in your camera.

You want lovely photographs printed, so that you can scrapbook and frame them to cherish for years to come, but this no longer means you need to make a trip to a photo lab. Print those beautiful, full color photos from your own printer.

If you haven’t printed in a while, or do not currently get the results you are looking for in a photograph, it would be wise to run a printer alignment, color calibration and print cartridge cleaning. These functions (accessible from the printer menu) prevent blurring, streaking and improperly aligned prints.

Set your printer for photo quality prints. While normal mode works well for drafts and text, you will get the finest photo printed by switching to the best mode or photo mode. Choose your printer’s highest possible color resolution. The greater the d.p.i. setting, the better your prints will be. Also in your printer preferences, set your printer to accommodate the type of paper you are using.

Print on high quality photo paper. Color photographs generally look best on glossy photo papers, if printing classic black and white photos you may want to choose a matte finish photo paper.

Once you have printed your stunning photographs, give the ink up to 12 hours to dry to be safe before placing in a frame or scrapbook.

The Guide to Making the Most of your Home Printer

26. July 2010 13:54 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, photography, print photos, technology, savings, print, diy, coupons  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
You probably have that printer sitting on the desk top at home, but do you take full advantage of this tool?

Print your photos. We love our digital cameras, cell phone cameras are a beloved convenience, and DSLR cameras are becoming increasingly popular by the soccer moms and budding photographers. Now that we have our photos in digital format, we sometimes forget to print photos. It is so nice to hang photos in your home and office, very nice to give framed photos as gifts, and always good to keep the most cherished photos in an additional format. It is cheaper and easier to print at home than the days of film. Are you taking advantage of the photo printing ability of your printer? Make sure you change the settings to photo quality, purchase a pack of photo paper and print your favorite photos.

Put your printer to work for you. There are so many great coupons online, we no longer need to purchase newspapers, save junk mail and spend hours clipping. Websites like RetailMeNot.com, CouponQueeny.com and MoneySavingMom.com are dedicated to providing the latest retail and grocery coupons that you can use in your local stores. Make sure you change the printer settings to a lower, ink saving quality, and print coupons to save you money now.

Keep the children occupied. Print your own coloring books and puzzles, the preschoolers are sure to enjoy these on a rainy day. It may be Summer time, but you can keep the children learning and reviewing all year round with home work sheets.

How do you make the most out of your home printer?

What do you print?

Clickinks asked, and you answered. What do you like to print? We proposed the question to you, our fans, and were delighted with your responses. From coupons, to homework, photos, to invites, your printer is getting a work out. And it is a good thing you know how to save money on ink at http://www.clickinks.com/

We are so excited to announce our winners of the $50 in ink

Facebook fans:

Sandra from Florida is homeschooling












Britta from Idaho loves to print coupons


















Twitter friends:

Miranda of Texas prints pictures to color for her triplets















Paula of Illinois has a new printer for photos of all the kids

Inkjet Wars: Kodak vs HP

Kodak entered the printer market in '07 with a revolutionary business plan: charge slightly more for inkjet printers than other manufacturers, but charge half the price for ink cartridges.

They released the EasyShare 5300: an inkjet with cartridges 50% cheaper than HP’s equivalent model, the PhotoSmart C5180. They launched a full ad campaign, warning consumers that ink cartridges sold by other manufacturers cost more than crude oil.

Moreover, Kodak employed a new pigment-based dying process in their printers, which certified their images for 120 years. This contrasted favorably with the single year guaranteed by Hewlett Packard. Finally, Kodak promised they’d save consumers $110 annually.

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In 2007 Kodak sold 520,000 printers. Impressive? Not really, when you consider that 61 million inkjet multifunction printers were sold that year.

Yet the Kodak entry caused red alert at Hewlett Packard headquarters - both because Kodak aimed a stake at the heart of HP’s business model, and because Kodak targeted the most profitable consumers.

After all, Kodak’s promises of incredible savings wouldn’t mean anything to consumers for whom printers are dusty plastic boxes. It’s the printing maniacs – that 20% of inkjet consumers who purchase 80% of cartridges – with whom Kodak’s new strategy might resonate.

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Since then, the two brands have been firing back and forth at each other. Kodak designed the (possibly Star Trek influenced) printandprosper.com to accompany their EasyShare launch.

This website details the savings available with Kodak, and explains why other printer brands are soulless profit mongers. Hewlett Packard receives the worst beating from this campaign - arguably because the 63 cartridges types available from HP contrast with the 3 from Kodak.

In reply, Hewlett Packard launched The Truth About Printing – a site targeted like a cruise missile at Kodak.

It illustrates an infinite queue of frowning Kodak consumers desperate to return their EasyShares, and promises $50 toward an HP printer. That’s the printing equivalent of removing your gloves.

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More recently, this tussle has moved off the net and into the courts. Last year HP filed a complaint with the lengthily titled National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (his friends call him NAD) that Kodak’s claim to save consumers $110 annually was inaccurate.

Kodak failed even to send a representative to the complaints proceeding. Instead, they released a short press statement saying their advertising claims had already been substantiated.

NAD responded by bundling the case off to the Federal Trade Commission.

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Last December, the FTC decided that Kodak could claim their $110 savings – but on a minimum of four pages printed daily.

This tweaked text recognizes that consumers must guzzle an ink minimum before Kodak’s claims become viable. Kodak has asserted this alteration to their advertising vindicates them.

On the other hand, Hewlett Packard continues firing back. They most recently quoted a Lyra Research report that 50% of consumers never reach Kodak’s savings threshold.

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Who then does provide the cheapest printing? And do Kodak’s (seemingly) lower priced cartridges compromise quality? Comparisons of Kodak and Hewlett Packard’s printers are available through Google, though they report different things.

Broadly speaking – Kodak’s EasyShares give equal quality to HP’s PhotoSmart series, so long as Kodak photo paper is employed. This however cuts the potential savings of Kodak’s ink cartridges. By comparison, the PhotoSmarts offer a more vibrant printout – but degrade quickly.

Therefore neither brand is the undisputed champion of printing – putting to one side the minefield of ink cartridge pricing. The division between Kodak and Hewlett Packard will continue - while the consumer watches on, uncertain.

Print Great Photos from Your iPhone

10. February 2010 13:49 by Danielle Bernhard in print photos, canon, hp, wireless printing, iphone, epson printer, apple  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
I don’t know about you, but since getting my iPhone, and really ever since Smart phones became so “smart”, my laptop does not get the every day usage it used to see from me. I do still have to log in for a few tasks, such as printing photos.

There are some useful and creative iPhone apps that allow you to even print photos from the iPhone. There are some great, free apps that you can install to print to a Wi-Fi network enabled printer.

Looking for more fun with photos? PS Mobile redeems the lack of editing in the iPhone Camera with Photoshop style editing. Another free app, PS Mobile allows you to crop, brighten, add borders and even upload and host on Photoshop.com.

What Mobile phone apps have you found to make taking or printing photos easier?

Photo Printing is still alive

30. December 2009 09:02 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, print photos, print news  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Print News: InfoTrends Offers Advice for Photo Printing Firms


A release by the market research firm InfoTrends offers encouraging advice for photo printing companies.

InfoTrends, the market research firm, has released its 2009 report detailing the photo printing habits of US consumers. An extensive quantitative study, retailing for almost $4000, the survey offers advice for photo printing firms looking to maximize their investments. According to the InfoTrends press release, it finds ‘bright spots’ in the photo printing market in spite of stiff competition from digital storage methods. In particular, ‘Households with children, family memory keepers, and hobbyists’ remain dedicated photo printers, while there are ‘many things’ vendors can do to encourage increased rates of photo printing among consumers.

In June 2005, a report by InfoTrends found that the photo printing market faced possible decline. In spite of an 81% growth in digital cameras sales that year, consumers were increasingly likely to neglect printing their photos in favor of storing them digitally: either by hard disc, CD or DVD, or even on social media websites. Yet InfoTrends noted that an increase in photo printing revenues was possible, if vendors tried to increase the ease of printing while lowering the costs. The release found that, by 2010, revenues could either rocket to $7.6 billion or plummet, declining as low as $3.7 billion, depending on vendor strategies.

In February 2006, Hewlett Packard attempted to spur photo printing with the introduction of its self-service photo kiosk, housed in retailers across the US. The kiosk enabled consumers to not only design prints in under five minutes, but print each copy in 5 seconds. The Wal-Mart trial of the machines proved so successful that, by the end of 2006, it housed a total 50 photo-printers in its stores.

Yet in spite of this, vendors have largely failed to convince consumers of the worth of photo-printing over digital storage methods. In an article by Jennifer Nealson on December 1 2008 for DigitalCameraInfo.org, it was reported that the volume of images printed in the year 2007-8 grew by 1.7 billion to total 19.7 billion. This is good news – but at the same time a report by PMA Marketing Research entitled ‘Consumer Imaging in Canada’ for that 73% of young consumers share photos online. For consumers who used to print, this transition may be permanent.

InfoTrends believes that vendors have ‘only two or three years to gain back consumers’ who now store photos online. Equally though, the market research firm suggests that vendors may better invest their time in products that cannot be replaced online. The market for specialty printing – where images are placed on almost any item imaginable – grew 11% in sales from $9.9 billion in 2005 to $11.1 billion in 2006, according to Dimitrios Delis, Research Director at the Photo Marketing Association. It may be through these items that vendors assure their future.

Epson Conquers The Printer Cable With iPhone App

For years the printer cable was a tether by which the computer user was kept in spitting distance of their Epson printer. A slave were they to the length of that copper wire. But no longer. For, according to a December 14th, 2009 press release from Epson, owners of network capable Epson printers, including the Artisan 810 and Workforce 610, will be able to print their images wirelessly. The means of this freedom? Nothing less than Epson’s very own iPrint Application, for use with the iPhone.


The Epson App is available from the iTunes App store, seated alongside similar releases from rival brands. Earlier this year both Hewlett Packard and Canon enabled their customers to cast away their printer cables, so long as they own iPhones. The Apple device comes equipped with a sixth sense, meaning that it’s capable of automatically identifying printers in your network. It does this with WiFi. Yet persons seeking this printing freedom ought beware: according to a December 14th 2009 post by Ragu Magapann at TheStandard.com, the quality of images produced on the iPhone is mediocre.

Choosing the right paper for printing

8. June 2009 09:02 by Danielle Bernhard in printer paper, inkjet, clickinks, print photos, printing  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
There are many different kinds of paper out there intended for different kinds of print jobs. Using the wrong kind of paper can result in poor print quality or a waste of money. Hopefully, this will help take the mystery out of your prints.

First there's your every day normal paper. This is the cheap stuff that's just perfect for those small jobs, where having a slightly fuzzy looking print doesn't really matter.

Next we've got Inkjet stock paper. This is more geared for printing out important documents, business reports, etc. This differs from regular paper because it has a higher "brightness" level, meaning that the paper is smoother and less absorbent, so the print will look nice and crisp.

Lastly, we've got Photo Paper. You can guess what this is used for. The two big choices here are between “glossy” and “matte” paper. Glossy paper has a shine to it and really makes the colors come alive. It looks and feels like a true photographic print. Matte paper would be ideal if you were printing a graphic-heavy page for a report or special presentation. The colors look bright, text looks dark and crisp, and it has a real professional feel to it.

The fancier paper might make you shy away because of the price, but Clickinks paper is actually up to 60% less than the official brands!

How to save money, and still enjoy life in 2009

29. May 2009 08:34 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, print photos, savings, coupons, epson printer, economy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
There is so much talk these days about the restrictive economy. I, like many others, am always looking for ways to save money without missing out on the things I enjoy.

One of the things I most enjoy is my child. I am constantly taking photos of my child, friends and extended family! I also enjoy all those professional photos taken at school, sports and theme parks. Now, instead of purchasing high priced packages throughout the year, I can print an unlimited number of photos for a drastically lower price using my Epson Stylus Photo printer. My replacement ink cartridge is only $6.95 at clickinks.com, less than the purchase price of one printed photo!

In this economy I try not to pay retail whenever possible. Not only do I save money by purchasing "compatible" ink cartridges for my printer, I also am constantly on the look out for coupons. Whether I am going to a restaurant, purchasing from my favorite on-line T-shirt store or buying groceries I am always looking for coupons on-line first! I can print coupons for the local movie theater, restaurant, boutique or my groceries before heading out, and save significantly in this hard pressed economy! So, save on ink & then you can afford to print those coupons and continue on the money saving path!