The Clickinks Blog | new printer

Should I buy an Inkjet or Laser Printer?

 
 
The type of printer that is best for you depends greatly on how you plan to use it.  Do you print documents in mass quantities? More than 3 pages a day, or more than 20 pages a week? If so, you it would be worth switching to a laser printer.    
Laser printers also produce high quality text documents, although if you are printing primarily color photos you may want to stick with a good inkjet printer. 
Laser printers have a higher cost initially, and use toner cartridges that are priced higher than most inkjet, however you will notice the toner cartridges have a much higher yield, which will save you time and money in the long run. 
In the Recycler’s article Cost effectiveness of laser versus inkjet discussed David Connett had a good point about duplexing as well, “Some laser printers automatically print on both sides”, which is another time and money saver that you will find in laser printers over inkjet.
Laser toner cartridges can cost around $91, on average, however the laser toner cartridge is able to print 1,500 to 3,500 pages, whereas a standard inkjet cartridge may only costs $23, but only produces approximately 200 pages. Per print you are looking at a significant savings long term with a laser printer.   
You can also find quality remanufactured toner cartridges to easily save up to an additional 50% off those average prices, with no loss in quality to be seen.

Should you buy a Laser Printer? If you are printing documents in high quantity, the answer is a resounding yes.
 

Iphone printing is now available to everyone

Have you seen the new printing capability from iPhones and other iOS devices? One day I clicked forward and voila I was asked if I wanted to print the email. Why, yes I do, how exciting! Now to get a wireless printer.




















In apps that support printing, such as Mail, Photos and Safari Internet, you will see the option shown to Print. Clicking the Print button brings up another dialog box of printer options, now you will select from the printers found on your wireless network.



















This new printing capability, AirPrint, works with HP’s new line of e-printers. OK the new wireless printer will need to fall into this line. I have also been wanting an all-in-one with scanner, so I can print and save those old photographs. There are many options in the HP eprint line.

HP Envy e-All-in-One series uses #60 Ink
HP Photosmart Plus e-AiO (CN216A) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart Premium e-AiO (CN503A#B1H) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart Premium Fax e-AiO (C410a) uses #564 Ink
HP Photosmart e-AiO (CN731A) uses #60 Ink
HP Photosmart eStation (C510) uses #564 Ink
HP LaserJet Pro M1536dnf Multifunction Printer uses #CE278A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CM1415fn Color Multifunction Printer uses #128A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CM1415fnw Color Multifunction Printer uses #128A Toner
HP LaserJet Pro CP1525n Color Printer uses #128A Toner

HP LaserJet Pro CP1525nw Color Printer uses #128A Toner
HP Officejet 6500A e-AiO uses #920XL Ink
HP Officejet 6500A Plus e-AiO uses #920XL Ink

HP Officejet 7500A Wide Format e-AiO uses #920XL Ink
HP Officejet Pro 8500A e-AiO uses #940XL Ink
HP Officejet Pro 8500A Plus e-AiO #940XL Ink


I decided on the Photosmart e-All-in-One printer (Model: CN731A), because at an affordable price I was able to get wireless access and an all in one with scanner & copier, plus the HP 60 ink cartridges this printer requires come in remanufactured (better for our environment and my wallet).

Now that I have my new printer in hand I love it. It is a beautiful small, black desktop printer, was easy to set up on my wireless network, worked with Windows XP and Windows 7 and our iPhones automatically connected to it. During the printer setup process you are provided with a personal email address so anyone can email, from anywhere, to your printer.

This must be one of the most convenient printers. I print photos, emails and coupons from my phone and laptop. Anyone can email to the printer, who needs a fax? We never need to wait to print until able to physically connect to the printer.

What type of printer do you use? Feel free to discuss the pros and cons.

The ABC's of Laser Printers

ASSEMBLY – A Laser Printer is great to have, especially in an office. Know your printer, and know what you are purchasing. Some laser printers include an all-in-one drum and toner assembly, which can be easier to use if you run a smaller office. Most large office printers will use a separate drum cartridge, which will save you in the long run.

BREAKAGE – Learn to avoid breakage by following these simple steps:

Use the correct paper for your printer, make sure that it is intended for a Laser Printer to avoid jams and achieve the best print quality.

If you hear any weird noises, stop. Look for error lights and assure the toner is inserted correctly and has clicked into place.

CARTRIDGE - When running low on toner it is common to shake the cartridge, but do not take those office aggressions out on it, a light shake with no rocking is all that is needed.

If you encounter smears or streaks on your print out, you may need to replace the drum. If you print nothing but a blank page, you may need a new toner cartridge.

If toner powder spills in your printer vacuum out or clean with a dry cloth before printing.

One last Acronym for you: R.T.M. – Read The Manual.

Should I switch to a Laser printer?

Home printers are nice to have at home, and ever so useful. Now that you are Making the Most of your Home Printer, you may be questioning the quality of your printer.

Inkjet printers are nice to have if you are printing color photos once a week. If not, you may want to look into the benefits of a laser printer.

Buy in bulk. You know to save money on groceries and paper products by buying in larger quantities, but did you know that laser toner can also save you money? You will find the laser printer, as well as the toner cartridges, at a higher initial purchase price, but once you figure in the yield of a toner cartridge versus inkjet, you will see the significant savings.

Longer lasting quality. To keep your inkjet from drying up, you need to print out all the colors once every week or so. If you are like me, daily printing is done in the office and the fun photos and useful coupons are printed as needed, which may not occur until the next holiday. Laser toner is a powder, it will not dry up and will be top quality whenever you print.

Large jobs. Not only can a laser printer wait longer until use, it is more productive at printing those large jobs when they do arise. Laser printers are recommended for offices and for anyone running heaving printing jobs.

Print Faster. In an office, or in a hurry? Laser printers print, well, at laser speed. Pardon the pun.

Quality text. While inkjets are superior for often printing photos, laser printers offer a superior text quality. You will want to look at what you print, as well as how often you print, when making the decision to switch to a Laser printer.

What do you print?

Clickinks asked, and you answered. What do you like to print? We proposed the question to you, our fans, and were delighted with your responses. From coupons, to homework, photos, to invites, your printer is getting a work out. And it is a good thing you know how to save money on ink at http://www.clickinks.com/

We are so excited to announce our winners of the $50 in ink

Facebook fans:

Sandra from Florida is homeschooling












Britta from Idaho loves to print coupons


















Twitter friends:

Miranda of Texas prints pictures to color for her triplets















Paula of Illinois has a new printer for photos of all the kids

Dell Eliminates Need For Printer Drivers With Free Download

Perhaps one of the biggest problems with having office printers on network is making sure each computer has the correct drivers for the printers. After all, without those drivers people are left staring at their text on the monitor – unable to print the page. And when you're talking about hundreds of people accessing dozens of printers in a corporation, the problem can become epidemic.

Fortunately now Dell is releasing a download for their newest printers that lets people forgo drivers entirely. Instead, anyone connected to the network can print instantly from any Dell-produced printer; there's no need even for printer queue names and other details. The download is called Dell Proximity Printing and – best of all – it's available free starting June 8th. It should save office IT managers a lot of headaches.

For more information visit Dell's website. In the meantime, for Dell ink cartridges at the lowest prices, trust Clickinks.com.

Looking For A New Printer? Consider The Lexmark Pinnacle

22. March 2010 09:27 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, print news, new printer, cheap ink, printer buying, lexmark  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
People looking to upgrade their printer may find the Lexmark Pinnacle an excellent choice. The printer made waves when Lexmark revealed its ink cartridges cost only $4.99 while printing five hundred pages. In addition, Lexmark offer one of the industry’s longest warranties for the printer: five years. Also, the printer boasts the unique SmartSolutions interface. This enables people to complete any function with a single touch – great for productivity.

Now the Lexmark Pinnacle has received industry recognition for these great features. Last week the printer was awarded a 2010 Hot Tech Demo Award at the Fifth Annual Small Business Summit. The Lexmark Pinnacle was one of only 6 products to be recognized. Editor of Smallbusinesstechnology.com Ramon Ray commented: “It’s refreshing to see Lexmark’s Pinnacle – a real AIO tool with Web solutions that add a much-desired layer of simplicity to business processes."

The Pinnacle might therefore be in the front running when you upgrade your printer!

Will that New Printer Save your Green backs?

Go Green today, not just because it is St. Patrick’s Day, but because the green is a reminder of our Earth friendly ways that, on some level, we all strive for. Even as we aim to recycle and keep loads out of the landfill, there has been an urge lately to buy more printers, throwing perfectly functioning printers in the trash all in the name of saving on ink.

When inside an office supply chain, you may have looked at the high retail prices of your ink or toner cartridges, and then looked at the sale price of a new printer. Don’t let it fool you, if it seems too good to be true – it probably is.

HP, Epson and other printer manufacturers are guilty of this; they sell the printers at low prices, with nothing more than a starter cartridge included, and then increase the price of the subsequent cartridges. By encouraging consumers to buy a new printer, they are creating a lot of unnecessary environmental waste.

The solution is to keep your printer out of the landfill and keep more of your money in pocket. Purchase remanufactured (professionally refilled and recycled) ink cartridges from a reputable company like Clickinks.com. Your printer, wallet and grandchildren will thank you.

Inkjet Wars: Kodak vs HP

Kodak entered the printer market in '07 with a revolutionary business plan: charge slightly more for inkjet printers than other manufacturers, but charge half the price for ink cartridges.

They released the EasyShare 5300: an inkjet with cartridges 50% cheaper than HP’s equivalent model, the PhotoSmart C5180. They launched a full ad campaign, warning consumers that ink cartridges sold by other manufacturers cost more than crude oil.

Moreover, Kodak employed a new pigment-based dying process in their printers, which certified their images for 120 years. This contrasted favorably with the single year guaranteed by Hewlett Packard. Finally, Kodak promised they’d save consumers $110 annually.

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In 2007 Kodak sold 520,000 printers. Impressive? Not really, when you consider that 61 million inkjet multifunction printers were sold that year.

Yet the Kodak entry caused red alert at Hewlett Packard headquarters - both because Kodak aimed a stake at the heart of HP’s business model, and because Kodak targeted the most profitable consumers.

After all, Kodak’s promises of incredible savings wouldn’t mean anything to consumers for whom printers are dusty plastic boxes. It’s the printing maniacs – that 20% of inkjet consumers who purchase 80% of cartridges – with whom Kodak’s new strategy might resonate.

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Since then, the two brands have been firing back and forth at each other. Kodak designed the (possibly Star Trek influenced) printandprosper.com to accompany their EasyShare launch.

This website details the savings available with Kodak, and explains why other printer brands are soulless profit mongers. Hewlett Packard receives the worst beating from this campaign - arguably because the 63 cartridges types available from HP contrast with the 3 from Kodak.

In reply, Hewlett Packard launched The Truth About Printing – a site targeted like a cruise missile at Kodak.

It illustrates an infinite queue of frowning Kodak consumers desperate to return their EasyShares, and promises $50 toward an HP printer. That’s the printing equivalent of removing your gloves.

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More recently, this tussle has moved off the net and into the courts. Last year HP filed a complaint with the lengthily titled National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (his friends call him NAD) that Kodak’s claim to save consumers $110 annually was inaccurate.

Kodak failed even to send a representative to the complaints proceeding. Instead, they released a short press statement saying their advertising claims had already been substantiated.

NAD responded by bundling the case off to the Federal Trade Commission.

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Last December, the FTC decided that Kodak could claim their $110 savings – but on a minimum of four pages printed daily.

This tweaked text recognizes that consumers must guzzle an ink minimum before Kodak’s claims become viable. Kodak has asserted this alteration to their advertising vindicates them.

On the other hand, Hewlett Packard continues firing back. They most recently quoted a Lyra Research report that 50% of consumers never reach Kodak’s savings threshold.

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Who then does provide the cheapest printing? And do Kodak’s (seemingly) lower priced cartridges compromise quality? Comparisons of Kodak and Hewlett Packard’s printers are available through Google, though they report different things.

Broadly speaking – Kodak’s EasyShares give equal quality to HP’s PhotoSmart series, so long as Kodak photo paper is employed. This however cuts the potential savings of Kodak’s ink cartridges. By comparison, the PhotoSmarts offer a more vibrant printout – but degrade quickly.

Therefore neither brand is the undisputed champion of printing – putting to one side the minefield of ink cartridge pricing. The division between Kodak and Hewlett Packard will continue - while the consumer watches on, uncertain.

Xerox Invents Metal Ink For Printable Circuit

A new invention by Xerox researchers will allow electronic circuits to be printed on fabrics and plastics, according to an October 2009 press release from the printing brand. The new conductive silver ink paves the way for e-readers that can be folded like newspapers, or circuits that can be integrated into clothing and worn. It may make redundant the silicon chip, on which electronics have been dependent.


The Xerox silver ink has a uniquely low melting point for a metal, essential for printing on plastics. While normal metals have a melting point of 1,000 degrees, plastic melts at 150 degrees. Yet Xerox’s silver ink melts at 140 degrees, meaning the circuit can be printed, before the plastic is compromised. This opens the way for countless applications. Xerox’s press release for example raises the possibility of pill boxes that can measure their remaining contents, ideal for medication.

Speaking in the press release, Laboratory Manager at the Xerox Research Centre in Canada Paul Smith said: "We've found the silver bullet that could make things like electronic clothing and inexpensive games a reality today. This breakthrough means the industry now has the capability to print electronics on a wider range of materials and at a lower cost."

According to an October 2009 post by Dean Takahashi at VentureBeat.com, the silver ink has been in development at Xerox since 2001. The silver ink enables circuits to be printed like an everyday printer, using an ongoing feed. It doesn’t require the clean rooms necessary for making a silicon chip, and bypasses the cost of production. For the first time, circuits could be almost weightless, integrated into the fabric of a shirt.

Scientists have sought this development for some time: Hewlett Packard for example has been working on plastic electronics since the 1990s. Having created a silver ink viable for commercial use, Xerox intends to “aggressively seek interested manufacturers and developers by providing sample materials to allow them to test and evaluate potential applications.” Expect to see electronic billboard t-shirts before the end of the next decade.