The Clickinks Blog | laserjet

Should I buy an Inkjet or Laser Printer?

 
 
The type of printer that is best for you depends greatly on how you plan to use it.  Do you print documents in mass quantities? More than 3 pages a day, or more than 20 pages a week? If so, you it would be worth switching to a laser printer.    
Laser printers also produce high quality text documents, although if you are printing primarily color photos you may want to stick with a good inkjet printer. 
Laser printers have a higher cost initially, and use toner cartridges that are priced higher than most inkjet, however you will notice the toner cartridges have a much higher yield, which will save you time and money in the long run. 
In the Recycler’s article Cost effectiveness of laser versus inkjet discussed David Connett had a good point about duplexing as well, “Some laser printers automatically print on both sides”, which is another time and money saver that you will find in laser printers over inkjet.
Laser toner cartridges can cost around $91, on average, however the laser toner cartridge is able to print 1,500 to 3,500 pages, whereas a standard inkjet cartridge may only costs $23, but only produces approximately 200 pages. Per print you are looking at a significant savings long term with a laser printer.   
You can also find quality remanufactured toner cartridges to easily save up to an additional 50% off those average prices, with no loss in quality to be seen.

Should you buy a Laser Printer? If you are printing documents in high quantity, the answer is a resounding yes.
 

How does a Laser Printer Work?

22. January 2011 06:00 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, drum unit, laser toner cartridges, laserjet, remanufactured toner  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
You may have a Laserjet printer, or have at least used one, but do you really know how a laser printer works?

In the beginning, the first printers attached to computers were impact printers, typically dot matrix. Everyone understood how these devices worked, as they functioned just like the electric typewriters of the time. A hard object struck an ink ribbon with enough force to transfer the ink onto the page. As technology evolved, along came the next generation, which included inkjet and laser printers. The inkjet printer works just like the name implies; an image is put on the paper by using microscopic jets of ink. The laser printer, on the other hand, is a bit of a mystery. How can a highly focused beam of light impart letters and images on a piece of paper? Is the laser inside my printer dangerous?

Following are the six key processes that happen inside a laser printer when you click print.

Charging: A charge roller (or corona wire in older machines) will project an electrostatic charge onto the photoreceptor. This is a revolving drum or belt which is capable of holding an electrostatic charge on its surface as long as it hasn't been exposed to wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (and will be referred to as drum for the rest of this article).

Writing: A processor chip converts information for scanning onto the drum. The laser is aimed at a series of lenses and mirrors onto the drum. Lasers are used because they generate a coherent beam of light for a high degree of accuracy. Wherever the laser strikes the drum, it reverses the charge, thus creating a latent image on the surface.

Developing: The surface containing the latent image is exposed to toner, which is very fine particles of wax or plastic mixed with coloring agents. The charged toner particles are electrostatically attracted to the drum where the laser wrote the latent image.

Transferring: The drum is pressed or rolled over paper, transferring the image. Higher end machines use a positively charged transfer roller on the back-side of the paper to pull the toner from the photoreceptor to the paper.

Fusing: The paper passes through a fuser assembly, which has rollers that provide heat and pressure that bonds the toner to the paper.

Cleaning: When the print is complete, an electrically neutral rubber blade cleans any excess toner from the drum and deposits it into a waste reservoir, and a discharge lamp removes the remaining charge from the drum.

Each printer applies these steps in different ways. Most laser printers today actually use a linear array of light-emitting diodes to write the light on the drum. The toner is based on either wax or plastic, so that when the paper passes through the fuser assembly, the particles of toner melt. The paper may or may not be oppositely charged. The fuser can be an infrared oven, a heated pressure roller, or a xenon bulb. The warm up process that a laser printer goes through when power is initially applied to the printer consists mainly of heating the fuser element. Many printers have a toner-conservation mode which uses less toner but does yield prints with lower contrast. Color laser printers add colored toner in three additional, yet identical, processes.

So you now know that when you print that document, you are safe from a wayward laser beam melting a hole in your monitor and when it is time to get a replacement for that laser toner cartridge, you need to go to ClickInks.com. With your purchase of our remanufactured toner cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time.

The ABC's of Laser Printers

ASSEMBLY – A Laser Printer is great to have, especially in an office. Know your printer, and know what you are purchasing. Some laser printers include an all-in-one drum and toner assembly, which can be easier to use if you run a smaller office. Most large office printers will use a separate drum cartridge, which will save you in the long run.

BREAKAGE – Learn to avoid breakage by following these simple steps:

Use the correct paper for your printer, make sure that it is intended for a Laser Printer to avoid jams and achieve the best print quality.

If you hear any weird noises, stop. Look for error lights and assure the toner is inserted correctly and has clicked into place.

CARTRIDGE - When running low on toner it is common to shake the cartridge, but do not take those office aggressions out on it, a light shake with no rocking is all that is needed.

If you encounter smears or streaks on your print out, you may need to replace the drum. If you print nothing but a blank page, you may need a new toner cartridge.

If toner powder spills in your printer vacuum out or clean with a dry cloth before printing.

One last Acronym for you: R.T.M. – Read The Manual.

Should I switch to a Laser printer?

Home printers are nice to have at home, and ever so useful. Now that you are Making the Most of your Home Printer, you may be questioning the quality of your printer.

Inkjet printers are nice to have if you are printing color photos once a week. If not, you may want to look into the benefits of a laser printer.

Buy in bulk. You know to save money on groceries and paper products by buying in larger quantities, but did you know that laser toner can also save you money? You will find the laser printer, as well as the toner cartridges, at a higher initial purchase price, but once you figure in the yield of a toner cartridge versus inkjet, you will see the significant savings.

Longer lasting quality. To keep your inkjet from drying up, you need to print out all the colors once every week or so. If you are like me, daily printing is done in the office and the fun photos and useful coupons are printed as needed, which may not occur until the next holiday. Laser toner is a powder, it will not dry up and will be top quality whenever you print.

Large jobs. Not only can a laser printer wait longer until use, it is more productive at printing those large jobs when they do arise. Laser printers are recommended for offices and for anyone running heaving printing jobs.

Print Faster. In an office, or in a hurry? Laser printers print, well, at laser speed. Pardon the pun.

Quality text. While inkjets are superior for often printing photos, laser printers offer a superior text quality. You will want to look at what you print, as well as how often you print, when making the decision to switch to a Laser printer.

How To Replace The Drum Unit In Your Laser Printer

Did you know the drum unit of your laser printer is separate from the toner cartridge? Like the toner, it occasionally needs replacing – at which time your printer LCD display may read ‘Change Drum Soon.’ However, if your printer doesn’t have an LCD display, you’ll know the drum unit needs replacing when prints have thick black spots, become blurry, or print out lighter than normal.

To replace the drum unit of your laser printer, please follow these simple steps:

1) If you’ve recently done printing, let the machine cool down. It gets hot!

2) Handle the drum carefully. It holds ink that can splatter!

3) Open the printer’s front cover.

4) If your laser printer includes a drum lever, flip it so that it’s vertical.

5) Pull the drum unit and toner cartridge assembly from the printer with the handle.

6) Hold the lock lever down on the assembly and remove the toner bin.

7) Take the new drum unit and remove the protective sheet.

8) Reinstall the toner cartridge into your new drum unit by sliding into place. If installed correctly, the lock lever will lift easily.

9) Slide your new assembly into the laser printer. It should snap into place.

10) Close the drum lock lever, if your laser printer comes equipped with one.

11) Close the top cover.

12) If your printer has an LCD display, press ‘Options’ then ‘Yes’ to ‘Replace Drum.’

13) Once the laser printer has finished recognizing the drum unit, you’re ready to print!

The old drum unit should be placed in a plastic bag. After that it can be recycled.

Brother announces new printer models

Brother announces new printer models added to their HL and MFC series

Considering a new Laser Printer? Recently, Brother announced the launch of 5 new laser printer models to be added to their series of HL and MFC Laser printers.

The first printer will become available for retail later this month. The Brother HL-3040CN will feature a print speed of 17 pages per minute, whether printing in color or black and white. With a paper tray holding a maximum of 250 sheets and a print dpi resolution of 600 x 2400 this printer can be connected through an Ethernet cable or USB 2.0 interfaces.

Also out later this month will be the second addition to the Brother HL series, the Brother HL-3070CW. This printer offers even more features than the HL-3040CN. Boasting everything that the HL-3040CN has plus extra integrated Wi-Fi features and support for PCL6 and BR-Script3 emulation. This printer also allows USB flash drives to be connected directly to the printer, making printing JPEG and PDF files much easier without having to connect to a computer.

Brother has another three new additions to the MFC series, the Brother MFC-9010CN, Brother MFC-9120CN and the Brother MFC-9320CW All-in-One printers.

The MFC-9010CN all-in-one combines print, scan and copy capabilities, with printing speeds up to 17 ppm. The MFC-9010CN also has printing resolutions of up to 600 x 2400 dpi and has a paper tray holding a maximum of 250 sheets. Like the HL-3000 series printers this printer can also be connected via Ethernet or USB interfaces. The MFC-9010CN uses the popular Brother toner and drum sets.

The MFC-9120CN has all the same features offered by the MFC-9010CN plus this printer goes a step further by offering Super 3G faxing capabilities, making fast and efficient faxing a tempting selling point for office users.

The MFC-9320CW also has the same features offered by the MFC-9010CN plus offers the extra Wi-Fi feature and the ability to print directly from a USB flash drive.

The Brother MFC-9010CN, MFC-9120CN and the MFC 9320CW, along with the necessary Brother toner will be available in October, 2009.

Printing with the Cost Effective HP Color LaserJet 2605

Printing with the cost effective HP Color LaserJet 2605

There are many printers on the market today, making the printer buying process quite intimidating. A little research on the printer, and the corresponding toner cartridges, will benefit you tremendously. Hewlett Packard manufactures the HP Color LaserJet 2605 printer, which uses the HP Color LaserJet Q6000A Toner Cartridge. This printer meets all requirements of the modern small office by combining functionality and affordability.

You will notice that the Q6000A Toner produces fine and sharp results. The HP Color LaserJet 2605 is an amazing choice for any small office that provides top notch print speed and stunning detail.

The HP Color LaserJet 2605 is a user friendly, efficient printer that will suit the demands of any office. The installation of the Q6000A Toner is also quick and easy.

Sometimes the costs of toner cartridges will add up quickly, outweighing the cost of the printer. When it is time to replace your toner cartridges, you will find Remanufactured Q6000A Toner is the best solution. Original brand name (OEM) cartridges are almost double the out of pocket cost, and impact on the environment.

The quality of printing is equal, whether using Remanufactured or OEM cartridges, so today there is really no reason to use an OEM when Remanufactured cartridges are available.

Not only is a Remanufactured toner cartridge easier on your out of pocket expenses, as I mentioned it is also a lesser impact on the environment. Remanufactured cartridges are recycled cartridges, a green friendly way to do business.

The HP Color LaserJet 2605 with a HP Color LaserJet Q6000A Remanufactured Toner Cartridge is a terrific solution to your office printing needs.