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The Differences Between Tattoo ink, Pen ink and Printer ink

20. July 2012 03:01 by Neeru in ink experts, inks  //  Tags: ,   //   Comments (0)

Ink is ink right? Wrong! Contrary to popular belief, there are various types of ink out there that all perform many different functions. Getting in the know about what types of inks are out there will certainly give you kudos points amongst you’re friends, not many people know this stuff!

According to a survey undertaken in February 2012 by Harris Interactive, a staggering 42% of US citizens admit to having at least one tattoo, now that is certainly a lot of ink! The origins of tattoo ink stem back thousands of years ago and have since evolved into the increasingly popular artist’s aid that it is today.

Most recent variations include UV light tattoos which create glow-in-the-dark body art work and easily removable permanent tattoos that can be erased with just a couple of laser sessions, as opposed to the laborious procedure of yesteryear which required near to 12 laser treatments to achieve results.

Despite its evident popularity tattoo ink has not been without its problems. Due to the fact that the substance is not regulated in the US, tattoo artists are given free rein to alter ink formulas, which can then lead to difficulty in distinguishing the exact components that make up certain tattoo inks.  Traditionally, tattoo inks are made up of anti-fade and smudge components; no one wants to pay for a tattoo that will come off in the shower do they! However this often results in heavy and potentially harmful components such as particular metals, alcohols and chemicals being used. 

A far cry from the arguably exciting nature of tattoo ink, the humble pen ink has a standardized formula and is heavily regulated in the US meaning this formula cannot be tampered with by different manufactures. Unlike tattoo ink, pen ink commonly uses dyes as opposed to pigments due to their ability to not clot or dry inside the actual pen.

Mirroring the vast differences between tattoo and pen ink, the ever useful printer ink certainly follows suit. Unlike tattoo ink with its often unknown elements, it is widely accepted that Printer ink is made up of four components colorants, binders, additives and carrier substances. However, similar to tattoo and pen ink, printer ink can be split into two categories: dye-based and pigment-based both of which offer different finishes and host their own benefits.

The type of printer will determine whether a dye-based or pigment-based ink is to be used which is ultimately important to remember. Nothing can be more annoying than purchasing ink that won’t work for your printer.

The differences between all these three ink types are clear and interesting to see. What’s even more interesting is to see the ways in which ink and its uses will evolve over the years to come. Who knows what ink could be used for in 10 years’ time, watch this space! 

The Home and Business Printer Glossary

Have you ever shopped for a printer wondering if you should pay extra for “PictBridge”? Shopped for an ink cartridge and gotten confused by the difference between “OEM” and “Remanufactured Cartridge”?  Or spoken to a graphic designer and felt clueless what the “pantone” in your print job was?  In an effort to assist with all your printer needs, we have assembled this Printer Glossary below.  Feel free to print and bookmark for reference.

All-in-One (AIO) - This is a multifunction printer that can also scan and copy. Many of these devices can send and receive faxes as well. These are sometimes referred to as multi function printers.

Anti-Aliasing - The process of removing or reducing the jagged distortions in curves and diagonal lines so that lines appear smooth or smoother.

Auto Answer - This is a setting on most fax machines, fax modems and multifunction devices with fax capability. With auto answer, the device automatically picks up incoming fax calls after a specified number of rings.

Automatic Document Feeder - A tray and/or attachment that feeds one page at a time into a fax, copier, printer, or scanner.

Bit - The abbreviation for binary digit; the smallest unit of digital information, represented by 1 or 0. Computers use many bits to represent information.

Bit Depth - A digital image is represented as a bit-map (a grid of dots). Bit Depth is the number of color tones that can be associated with each dot. A 1-bit color, for example, can only contain 2 colors: black and white. But an 8-bit color contains 256 shades (color or gray), while a 24-bit color contains 16.7 million shades.

Bitmap File - The standard graphics format carries the file extension .BMP.

Borderless Printing - Printing photos with no white space around the edges. Borderless prints look like the high quality prints from a photo lab.

Brightness - An adjustment to control the lightness and darkness of an image, measured by the percentage of reflected light.

Broadcast Faxing - A fax machine feature found on most all-in-ones that sends the same fax documents to multiple recipients.

Carriage - The fixture in the print device that holds the print head. Generally travels along carriage rods from side to side.

Central Processing Unit (CPU) – This is the portion of a computer system that carries out the instructions of a computer program, and is the primary element carrying out the computer's functions. The central processing unit carries out each instruction of the program in sequence, to perform the basic arithmetical, logical, and input/output operations of the system.

Centronics - A pioneering American manufacturer of computer printers now remembered primarily for the parallel interface and printer cable that bears its name. These cables are often referred to as Centronics cables.

Charging Roller - One of the complex systems of rollers inside a typical laser printer or all-in-one. The charging roller transfers an electrical charge to the photo conductor, which repels particles to the toner.

CMYK - An acronym to represent cyan, magenta, yellow and black, the basic colorants (dyes, pigments or toners) used in digital imaging. These four colors alone are used to create all colors in an image.

Collation - A feature offered on some inkjet printers, laser printers and all-in-ones. With collation turned on, multiple copies of a document are printed as separate documents.

Compatible Cartridges - A brand new printer cartridge that is made by a third party, not the OEM by the original printer manufacturer.  Compatible cartridges are widely known as a trusted, affordable option.

Contrast Enhancement (Automatic) - Automatically brightens images that appear dark or hazy, and applies appropriate tone correction to deliver improved quality and clarity.

Corona Wires - A set of thin wires inside the body of a laser printer that transfers a static charge to each sheet of paper; this charge in turn attracts the toner to the paper.

Dedicated Print Server - A computer in a network dedicated to managing all available printers.

Dot Matrix - An older impact printer that used a grid of tiny pins to transfer ink from a ribbon to the page. Dot matrix printers can produce basic graphics, but have inferior print quality compared to inkjet or laser printers.

Dots Per Inch (DPI) - A measurement of print resolution. DPI indicates how many individual dots a device can address on a page per square inch of area. DPI is typically listed as horizontal resolution by vertical resolution.

Driver - Software that comes with a peripheral that allows the peripheral to communicate with the computer.

Duplex - Printing both sides of a two-sided document on a single sheet of paper.

Drum unit - The photoreceptor in a laser printer which is electrically charged, rotating and  coated with organic photo conductors.  The drum picks up toner and then prints the image onto paper by direct contact and heat, which fuses the ink to the paper.

Enhanced Capability Port (ECP) - This is an international specification describing bidirectional communications using a computer's parallel port. ECP focuses on printers and scanners.

Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) - An international standard documenting bidirectional communications using a computer’s parallel port. EPP focuses on peripherals other than printers and scanner.

Ethernet Network - The simplest, slowest and least expensive network design, usually well-suited for home or small offices.

Fax Forwarding - A fax feature that enables the machine to automatically forward any document it receives to another fax.

Fax Header - An informational line of text printed at the top of every page by a fax machine; it includes a name, station ID and fax number.

FireWire - High-speed external connection used for connecting peripherals, also referred to as "IEEE 1394".

Firmware - Low-level software that runs in a digital camera, printer, scanner, etc. and controls the product's operation and user interface.

Font - A set of printing characters that share the same distinctive appearance. Fonts are used on a computer to display text on the monitor and print documents.

Fuser Roller - One of a system of rollers inside a laser printer. The fuser roller heats the page after the toner is applied, so the toner partially melts and sticks to the page for a permanent bond.

GIF Image - Short for Graphics Interchange Format; usually carries the file extension .GIF. The first truly universal standard format for file images, originally developed by CompuServe. Widely used on the web, GIF files are best used for small images in limited colors.

IEEE-1284 Standard - The international design specification for bidirectional parallel printer cables. Most inkjet and laser printers do not work properly unless the printer cable meets this specification. Most products now use USB for printer-to-computer communication.

Impact Printer - A class of printer that uses the force of an impact into an ink ribbon to create a printed character on a page. This impact is delivered by a rotating ball or wheel or through a grid of pins. This type of printer is generally slow, noisy and out-dated. These printers are useful for multipart forms such as invoices or shipping bills.

Individual Ink Cartridges (IIC) - Some inkjet manufacturers printing solution that has a different ink cartridge for each color.

InfraRed (IR) - This is a type of connection that allows data to be wirelessly transmitted from one device directly to another device when the infrared window on the camera is lined up with an infrared sensor on the other device. This technology is similar to what most TV remote controls use.

Inkjet Cartridge - An inkjet cartridge is a replaceable component of an inkjet printer that contains the liquid ink (and sometimes a print head, micro-chip and other technology and moving parts).


Inkjet Printer - A printer or an all-in-one unit that shoots fast-drying ink through tiny nozzles onto a page to form characters. The inkjet is currently the standard for personal computer printing. Inkjets are fast, affordable and quiet. They provide high-quality graphics and print in color.

Input/Output Card - Usually abbreviated I/O card. A standard computer adapter card that typically provides two serial ports for your modem and two parallel printer ports.

Interrupt Request - Usually abbreviated IRQ. A signal generated by an adapter card in the computer that alerts the CPU to handle incoming data from the keyboard, mouse, serial port or parallel port.

JPEG File - Usually carries the file extension .JPG. The current favorite image format among web surfers and graphics professionals, JPEG images are highly compressed to save more space than a .BMP or .GIF file.

Label Stock - A paper sheet carrying peel-off or perforated labels that are arranged in a specified pattern.

Landscape Printing - Printing where the longer length of the page runs from side to side rather than top to bottom. Landscape mode is often used to print spreadsheets and larger photographs.

Large-format Printer - An inkjet printer designed to handle paper sizes of 11x17 inches or larger. Some large-format printers also use continuous rolls of paper. These printers are generally designed to produce photo-quality posters, blueprints, maps, banners and signs.

Laser Printer – This is a device that uses static electricity and heat to bond particles of toner to the page to create the characters. This is the same technology used by many copy machines and is known as a best option for large businesses.

Local Area Network (LAN) - A group of computers in an office or building connected to one another by cabling. A network computer can access files on other computers in the network or enable others to open and use its files. Printers, modems and hard drives are also typically shared peripherals on a network.

Media - The material that the ink is printed upon, such as plain paper, mailing labels or transparency film.

Monochrome Printer - A printer that prints in only one color, usually black. Some monochrome printers can also produce text and graphics in shades of gray, as well as strict black-and-white.

Network Interface Card (NIC) - An adapter card installed in a computer that enables it to connect to a network; most NICs support several different types of networks and network cabling.

Network Printer – This is a printer available for use by all of the workstations on a network. A network printer either has its own built-in network interface card or it is connected to a printer server on the network.

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) - Products or components that are manufactured or purchased by a company and retailed under that company's brand name.

Page Description Language - A language recognized by computers and printers that define the physical characteristics of a page, including fonts, graphics, margins, spacing and colors.

Page Memory - The number of pages a fax can hold in its memory if it runs out of paper.

Pages Per Minute (PPM) - A measurement of printer speed, indicating how many finished pages a printer can produce over a 60 second period. PPM speeds are typically listed for both black-only and mixed text and color documents.

Page Storage – This is the number of pages (text or graphics) that can be stored internally on the given device.

Pantone - A color matching system supported by most desktop publishing and graphics design software.

Paper Capacity - Refers to how much paper the printer tray can accommodate.

Paper Guides - Adjustable plastic dividers that help hold paper in the proper alignment in a printer's paper feed tray. These guides can be moved to fit different dimensions, such as international sizes, envelopes or custom-sized paper.

Parallel Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. I/O adapter cards are available that can provide a computer with up to four separate parallel ports, but most computers come with one as standard equipment.

Peripheral - This is a device attached to a host computer, but not part of it, and is more or less dependent on the host. It expands the host's capabilities, but does not form part of the core computer architecture.

Peer-to-Peer Network - A simple network design that uses no file or printer servers. All workstations on the network are connected by cabling, which enables users to share files and hardware, such as printers.

PictBridge - PictBridge allows digital cameras, camcorders and other image-capture devices to connect and print directly to photo printers and other output devices; no computer is required.

Pixel - A single element within a digital photograph. The typical digital photograph is made up of several million pixels.

Port Connection - A communication link between hardware components. Types of connections include FireWire, Parallel, USB, Serial, and SCSI.

Port Polling - A procedure performed by Windows® each time the computer is booted and each time a print job is sent from an application. The operating system automatically checks the parallel port to make sure that a printer is ready to receive a print job. In many cases, port polling can be turned off to improve printing speed.

Print Buffer - A separate, standalone print spooler with its own built-in memory that connects a computer and printing hardware. The print buffer can spool print jobs, freeing up all of a computer's resources for applications.

Printer Cartridge - The device that integrates the print head, ink container and ink delivery systems.  A printer cartridge may contain ink or toner.

Printer Driver - The software that enables the operating system to properly build and format commands and data bound for the printer; in effect, a printer driver tells the operating system all it needs to know to successfully operate the printer.

Printer Emulation - This is software that enables a newer printer to act like an older, widely used printer so it can recognize and print documents formatted for that older model.

Printer Server - A computer solely dedicated to supporting a network printer. The server's system RAM and hard drive are used to store print jobs in the queue, and print jobs can be reordered, paused, or deleted from the server's keyboard.

Print Head - This is the element of a printer that applies the ink to the paper. In an inkjet device, the print head contains the nozzles and electronics that control the ejection of the ink onto the selected media.

Print Quality - A qualitative description of how pleasing printed output looks. Most printers enable the user to adjust the quality of print and the speed of printing. In general for inkjet printers, slower print speeds will result in higher print quality.

Print Resolution - The quantity of data capable of being printed, typically measured in dots per inch (DPI). Higher resolution is one of many factors that can improve print quality.

Queue - A sequence of documents sent to a printer to be processed sequentially, usually in the order in which they were sent by the computer.

Remanufactured Cartridge - ClickInks.com’s remanufactured cartridges are made from recycled cartridge cores. Each cartridge is cleaned, inspected and refilled to conform to strict ISO 9001 quality standards and meet or exceed OEM specifications. Remanufactured cartridges from ClickInks.com contain the same amount of ink or more as the OEM ink cartridges, and print the same number of pages.  Remanufactured cartridges are widely recognized as a more affordable and environmentally friendly option, keeping empty cartridges out of landfills

Serial Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. This is a physical interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time.

Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) - Set of standards for physically connecting and transferring data between computers and peripheral devices.

Thermal Dye Sublimation - In dye-sublimation printing, the dyes vaporize and permeate the glossy surface of the paper before they return to solid form, creating a gentle gradation at the edges of each pixel. The color infuses the paper and is less vulnerable to fading and distortion over time.

Tri-Chamber Cartridge – This is a descriptive term for a singular inkjet cartridge that contains all three colors of ink; cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY).  Often marketed as a tri-color cartridge.

Universal Serial Bus (USB) - A fast input/output (I/O) data transfer standard used for connecting peripherals to a computer. Typically, each device connected to a computer uses its own port. USB can connect up to 127 peripherals through a single port, and peripherals can be connected together. USB devices may be hot swapped, which means that power does not have to be turned off to connect or disconnect a peripheral. USB has become the primary means of connection for printers and other peripherals, and is supported by most major hardware, software and telecommunications providers.

Ink Saving Fonts









 

Did you know that different fonts use differing amounts of ink to create the same characters? The examples listed above are all the same size and none of them have been set to bold. It becomes very obvious when you look at the examples side by side. This very text you are reading is in the Times New Roman font. You would potentially use less printer ink by selecting Calibri as opposed to Broadway or Bauhaus 93. A monetary savings in the thousands could be possible for larger organizations. The University of Wisconsin Green Bay has asked users to switch to Century Gothic for all printed documents. They have also switched their campus wide e-mail to Century Gothic. "The feedback we've gotten so far has been positive…Century Gothic is very readable." The school of 6,500 students was spending about $100,000 per year on ink and toner cartridges.

Recently a popular website tested different fonts for their ink-friendly ways, and Century Gothic and Times New Roman came out on top. Century Gothic uses approximately thirty percent less ink than Arial. The amounts of ink used are generally determined by the thickness of the lines. A font with ‘light’ or ‘narrow’ in its name generally uses less ink that its ‘bold’ counterpart said Thom Brown, an ink researcher with Hewlett Packard. Additionally, serif fonts, those with short horizontal strokes at the top and bottom of the characters, tend to use thinner lines and therefore less ink than a sans serif counterpart.

Now here is where things get a little confusing and not so cut and dry. While changing fonts may help you use less ink and buy fewer ink cartridges, it’s not necessarily the best decision for the environment. That’s because some fonts that use less ink are also wider. A document that’s approximately one page in length in the Arial font could possibly extend onto a second page when printed with Century Gothic. UW-Green Bay said research suggests that the monetary cost of ink is the main cost of a printout. The environmental cost of the additional paper used when printing with these reduced ink fonts is higher. Maybe the individual characters use less ink, but if you're using more paper, that's not so green, is it?

Other tips for reducing printing costs includes printing in ‘draft mode’ whenever possible and re-use and print on both sides of a piece of paper for those drafts. Always use print preview to eliminate wasting pages on useless text, like unwanted images and copyright lines. The use of an ink saving font is just another technique when you’re trying to consider the environmental impact of your printing habits.

So what is the best way to save on printing costs and help the environment? Simple, buy your ink and toner from http://www.clickinks.com/. The use of remanufactured ink cartridges helps to reduce the number of empty cartridges that are disposed of into landfills. Our high quality, low cost remanufactured cartridges are great for both the environment and your bottom line.

Ink poisoning: Can it happen and who is at risk

12. January 2011 06:00 by Danielle Bernhard in recycle cartridges, ink poisoning, inks, recycle  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
I’m here today to dispel an urban legend about ink poisoning. Today’s inks are not poisonous and it would take a very large amount to cause any harm to a human. There are other residents in many homes that we are going to discuss today. Cats and dogs are our four-legged family members that theoretically could be at risk. This is largely due to their lower body weight and naturally curious nature.

We’ve all been surprised at one point of time as to what our pets have gotten into. While the amount of ink that they could possibly ingest should not be harmful, you should be vigilant if they manage to chew on an ink cartridge or pen. They also are at risk of intestinal blockage or chocking on any plastic pieces they may have chewed off.

Unless you catch your pet in the act, you would probably have no idea that they ever did anything. Aside from the tell tale signs of finding an ink stained French poodle. If you think your pet may have come in contact with ink, you need to stay vigilant. Look for indicators of poisoning like agitation, drooling, staggering, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, and irritation around the mouth and/or eyes.

If the pet has ingested ink and appears fine, keep a vigilant eye on it and contact your veterinarian at your earliest convenience. If all is well, a trip to visit the vet may not be needed. You can also contact the Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 or http://aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/.

If you find ink has gotten on your pets fur, the best method for cleaning it up is using a mild dishwashing liquid detergent. This will keep the pet from trying to lick it off and also keeping it from staining anything in your home. Do not try to induce vomiting unless your veterinarian tells you to do so.

We all know that prevention is the best cure, so keep your and your pet’s environment clean and neat so there isn’t a chance for it to ingest a non-food item. Also don’t throw those printer cartridges in the trash, help save the environment by recycling them. The more we can keep out of the landfills, the greener the future for our pet’s future.

Who invented ink?

5. January 2011 07:39 by Danielle Bernhard in inkjet, inkjet cartridges, ink cartridge, technology, ink history, inks  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Today’s topic is about something so ingrained in our world, that most never think about it, yet we would all be lost without it. It’s used to help create art and to sign millionaire athletes’ contracts. Where would we be without ink? I wouldn’t be typing this blog, that’s for sure.

There are many debates amongst historians (Really, what else do they have to do?) about who first invented ink. Ink was the natural evolution after humans invented drawing and writing. We couldn’t continue carving on cave walls forever. Can you imagine relaxing on a tropical beach with an umbrella drink and reading a nice cave carving?

Some historians credit the invention of ink and paper to the Egyptians. This claim is because paper has its origin in the word papyrus. The papyrus plant is a wetland sage that was once abundant in the Nile Delta. Recorded history disputes those claims and lays all the credit to the Chinese.

Ink was originally created for marking the surfaces of hieroglyphics that were carved into stone. The first ink was a combination of soot and either animal glue or honey. This ink was invented by Tien-Lcheu, a noted Chinese philosopher of 2697 B.C. It became common throughout China by the year 1200 B.C. Other cultures soon adapted this invention and started adding colors derived from berries, plants, and other minerals. The colors of inks soon had ritualistic meanings attached to them.

As you have experienced, ink has moved a long way from its humble origins. Ink has evolved from the printing press of the industrial revolution to today’s remanufactured inkjet cartridges. In a way you could say that ink has come almost full circle, with the newest biodegradable inks just a modern variation of what Tien-Lcheu first created!

Black Friday Deals are coming this way

We are so excited to announce the upcoming Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals coming your way!  At Clickinks.com we have found some great discounts and prizes for you this year. 

I can tell you now that these will be big!  I will give you as many details as I can now, feel free to comment below, and be sure to subscribe as I will be able to reveal more as Black Friday grows closer.

* Monday, November 22nd PRE-BLACK FRIDAY SALE
  1. Take 15% Off all our inks and toners!
  2. Every order enters you in a daily drawing for a Customized Photo book!
Expires midnight Thursday, November 25th

* Friday, November 26th BLACK FRIDAY SALE
  1. Take 20% Off all our inks and toners!
  2. Every order enters you in a daily drawing for for a Customized Canvas print!Expires midnight Friday, November 26th
* Saturday, November 27th BLACK FRIDAY WEEKEND SALE
  1. Take 15% Off all our inks and toners!
  2. Every order enters you in a daily drawing for a Customized Photo book!
Expires midnight Thursday, November 28th







* Monday, November 29th CYBER MONDAY SALE

  1. Take 20% Off all our inks and toners!
  2. Every order enters you in a daily drawing for a Customized Canvas print!
  3. FREE Shipping on every order!
    Expires midnight Monday, November 29th

Where does ink come from?

16. August 2010 13:11 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, ink cartridge, technology, printer ink, ink history, inks, toner cartridges  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
No birds and bees here, no octopus either. The ink that we use today bears little resemblance to octopus ink, or melanin. In this century ink has become much more sophisticated and synthetic.

Printer ink contains pigments or dyes added to a base usually made from petroleum oil, de-ionized water and glycol, a thick syrupy substance that helps the ink to stick together and mix.

Toner, the powder used in laser printer and copier cartridges, is a manufacturer specific combination of special polymers and pigment, compounded into a fine powder, improving resolution.

The exact mixtures vary by the manufacturer, and are considered quite proprietary, however all ink cartridges come from the basis of a 1930 Ink jet cartridge patent, that we found very interesting.

Name Your Printer - Winner Announcement

What printer model do you use?  Clickinks asked, and our customers answered.  There are a lot of new and old Epson Stylus inkjet printers out there, as well as numerous HP printers.  Canon, Kodak, Lexmark and Brother Multifunctions showed up, too.  Kodak owners seem to like their printer for the great pictures and Brother owners seem to like their printers for everything else.  And by quick observation, dude no one got a Dell.   

We offered 1 lucky winner from Clickinks Facebook and Clickinks Twitter fan pages replacement ink for their printer, and are so excited to announce the winners.




























Jewel Nickolisen of Nebraska will receive her Epson Stylus CX6600 ink and David O'Mara of Idaho will receive ink for his Epson Stylus CX8400.

Thanks for playing, and follow along for more great chances to win your ink!

What do you print?

Clickinks asked, and you answered. What do you like to print? We proposed the question to you, our fans, and were delighted with your responses. From coupons, to homework, photos, to invites, your printer is getting a work out. And it is a good thing you know how to save money on ink at http://www.clickinks.com/

We are so excited to announce our winners of the $50 in ink

Facebook fans:

Sandra from Florida is homeschooling












Britta from Idaho loves to print coupons


















Twitter friends:

Miranda of Texas prints pictures to color for her triplets















Paula of Illinois has a new printer for photos of all the kids

You can remove the ink from your clothes

19. January 2010 10:40 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, printer help, ink cartridge, removing ink, inks, ink experts, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)
What to use to remove printer ink from your clothes.

We have all been there, whether you were trying to refill your printers ink cartridge or you simply left a pen in your pocket, you will need to get that ink out of your clothing.

The first step is to dab (not rub) the spilled ink with a towel, applying water and continuing until you see that ink is no longer removed by the towel.

Next leave it alone for a couple minutes (yes the waiting is the hardest part).

You may want to occupy your time watching a video, so you won’t think about it!




Once you have allowed a sufficient waiting period for the stain to air dry, dab the stain with rubbing alcohol, finger nail polish remover or even spray with hair spray, depending on what you may have on hand.


Use two new, clean paper towels, set the stained area on a towel and then dab the backside of the stain, pushing the ink onto the bottom towel. As the towel underneath begins to soak up the ink, move to a clean dry section. Continue until you see that ink is no longer removed by the towel.

At the end of the day, you should use a laundry pre-treatment soap, assuring that any remaining ink is removed in the wash.

Wash in the washing machine, using the warmest water level that the fabric can tolerate. If the stain does not come clean after washing, dab diluted bleach onto a towel and gently brush the stain clean. This should clean all ink out of your clothing.