The Clickinks Blog | inkjet

Who invented ink?

5. January 2011 07:39 by Danielle Bernhard in inkjet, inkjet cartridges, ink cartridge, technology, ink history, inks  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Today’s topic is about something so ingrained in our world, that most never think about it, yet we would all be lost without it. It’s used to help create art and to sign millionaire athletes’ contracts. Where would we be without ink? I wouldn’t be typing this blog, that’s for sure.

There are many debates amongst historians (Really, what else do they have to do?) about who first invented ink. Ink was the natural evolution after humans invented drawing and writing. We couldn’t continue carving on cave walls forever. Can you imagine relaxing on a tropical beach with an umbrella drink and reading a nice cave carving?

Some historians credit the invention of ink and paper to the Egyptians. This claim is because paper has its origin in the word papyrus. The papyrus plant is a wetland sage that was once abundant in the Nile Delta. Recorded history disputes those claims and lays all the credit to the Chinese.

Ink was originally created for marking the surfaces of hieroglyphics that were carved into stone. The first ink was a combination of soot and either animal glue or honey. This ink was invented by Tien-Lcheu, a noted Chinese philosopher of 2697 B.C. It became common throughout China by the year 1200 B.C. Other cultures soon adapted this invention and started adding colors derived from berries, plants, and other minerals. The colors of inks soon had ritualistic meanings attached to them.

As you have experienced, ink has moved a long way from its humble origins. Ink has evolved from the printing press of the industrial revolution to today’s remanufactured inkjet cartridges. In a way you could say that ink has come almost full circle, with the newest biodegradable inks just a modern variation of what Tien-Lcheu first created!

Registration Open For 2010 InkJet Academy

12. January 2010 11:09 by Danielle Bernhard in inkjet, print news, technology  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Do you think of yourself as an ink jetsetter? Do you consider learning how a printhead works the height of scientific inquiry? If so, the announcement of the 2010 InkJet Academy Conference (subtitled Theory of InkJet Technology) may be of interest. Featuring such Course Leaders as Mike Willis, the Managing Director of Pivotal Resources Ltd., the program is being held in the opening two days of February in Arizona. And for the low low price of $1095 per registrant, you could attend.

According to Imiconf.com, this one-time fee includes not just attendance at all sessions, but continental breakfasts, lunch, and coffee breaks for both days. Seemingly, the academy organizers are not advocates of dinner. The sessions, meanwhile, each last four hours and cover such topics as: ‘Advances in UV Curing Ink Technology’ and ‘Considerations for Page Arrays.’ Held at the Crown Plaza San Marcos Resort, attendants can at least be confident that the breakfasts will be good.

To register for the conference, and for the chance to see pictures of an Alpine lodge given the Andy Warhol treatment, visit the 2010 InkJet Academy website at: Imiconf.com.

Choosing the right paper for printing

8. June 2009 09:02 by Danielle Bernhard in printer paper, inkjet, clickinks, print photos, printing  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
There are many different kinds of paper out there intended for different kinds of print jobs. Using the wrong kind of paper can result in poor print quality or a waste of money. Hopefully, this will help take the mystery out of your prints.

First there's your every day normal paper. This is the cheap stuff that's just perfect for those small jobs, where having a slightly fuzzy looking print doesn't really matter.

Next we've got Inkjet stock paper. This is more geared for printing out important documents, business reports, etc. This differs from regular paper because it has a higher "brightness" level, meaning that the paper is smoother and less absorbent, so the print will look nice and crisp.

Lastly, we've got Photo Paper. You can guess what this is used for. The two big choices here are between “glossy” and “matte” paper. Glossy paper has a shine to it and really makes the colors come alive. It looks and feels like a true photographic print. Matte paper would be ideal if you were printing a graphic-heavy page for a report or special presentation. The colors look bright, text looks dark and crisp, and it has a real professional feel to it.

The fancier paper might make you shy away because of the price, but Clickinks paper is actually up to 60% less than the official brands!