The Clickinks Blog | diy

How to Print the Perfect Labels

13. August 2010 13:22 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, savings, printing, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
Printing labels is a terrific use of your printer. By using your own printer to make labels, you save money and get more creative, custom designs while saving the time of hand writing.

If you have a large quantity of labels to print, it is nice to start with them in Excel. You will merge them into Word, which is where you can customize and print labels.

Set up your data in Excel then create a mail merge, after which you will need to save and close the Excel spreadsheet. Open a new Word document, then select and follow the steps of the Mail Merge Wizard.  When it is time to select recipients you will use the Excel list you saved.

Labels can be printed not only for addressing envelopes, but also for books and binders, CD's and DVDs, files, dividers and so much more.
You can choose professional black, or any fun color ink, choose from clear, white, silver or decorative labels and there are even many different fonts, including some nice handwriting fonts to really personalize your labels.

What kind of projects have you created with print your own labels?

Ink jam: Why keeping your inkjets clean can save you money

29. July 2010 05:00 by Danielle Bernhard in printer setting, clickinks, ink cartridge, printer cartridge, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
A clogged print head on your inkjet printer can stop your print job dead in its tracks, but this can be overcome with a little attention.

If there has been a long period of no printer use, or if you have brought an old inkjet printer or ink cartridge out of retirement, you may be faced with less than optimal prints.

As you print, small droplets of ink can get stuck around the many tiny holes that make up an inkjet printer head. Once these drops of ink dry, they can form a crust around the print head opening, clogging it with dry ink and causing it to print poorly.


















If you are seeing poor quality print outs, your first step should be to perform a printer head cleaning. Simply open your Printer Settings on your computer and find your Printer Maintenance menu, as seen above, to clean the print head. Each menu will vary, but you should find a “Head Cleaning” option within any inkjet printer menu.

Once you have performed the built-in cleaning functions and followed up as needed, if this does not seem to do the job and is draining your precious ink there are a few ways to clean your print head manually.

If you have an inkjet printer like Epson or Brother, where the print head is usually part of the printer itself instead of the cartridge, you can use traditional rubbing alcohol on the print head to clean and remove dried ink residue. If you have an inkjet printer like Canon, HP, or Lexmark where the print head is usually part of the ink cartridge, you can clean the print head on the cartridge with a dry, soft cotton ball or clean cloth.

Don’t scrap an old inkjet printer that yields inferior printouts, what a waste to just throw the old one in a landfill. Make cleaning nozzles, unclogging print heads and dusting the exterior of your printer a regular part of your routine maintenance. You will maintain superior print quality and save yourself quite a bit of money.

Making Memories: How to Print Your Own Digital Photographs

Taking terrific photos is only half the fun. Those beautiful sceneries and special events, loving family moments and fun times with friends out on the town deserve more than to live in your camera.

You want lovely photographs printed, so that you can scrapbook and frame them to cherish for years to come, but this no longer means you need to make a trip to a photo lab. Print those beautiful, full color photos from your own printer.

If you haven’t printed in a while, or do not currently get the results you are looking for in a photograph, it would be wise to run a printer alignment, color calibration and print cartridge cleaning. These functions (accessible from the printer menu) prevent blurring, streaking and improperly aligned prints.

Set your printer for photo quality prints. While normal mode works well for drafts and text, you will get the finest photo printed by switching to the best mode or photo mode. Choose your printer’s highest possible color resolution. The greater the d.p.i. setting, the better your prints will be. Also in your printer preferences, set your printer to accommodate the type of paper you are using.

Print on high quality photo paper. Color photographs generally look best on glossy photo papers, if printing classic black and white photos you may want to choose a matte finish photo paper.

Once you have printed your stunning photographs, give the ink up to 12 hours to dry to be safe before placing in a frame or scrapbook.

The Guide to Making the Most of your Home Printer

26. July 2010 13:54 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, photography, print photos, technology, savings, print, diy, coupons  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
You probably have that printer sitting on the desk top at home, but do you take full advantage of this tool?

Print your photos. We love our digital cameras, cell phone cameras are a beloved convenience, and DSLR cameras are becoming increasingly popular by the soccer moms and budding photographers. Now that we have our photos in digital format, we sometimes forget to print photos. It is so nice to hang photos in your home and office, very nice to give framed photos as gifts, and always good to keep the most cherished photos in an additional format. It is cheaper and easier to print at home than the days of film. Are you taking advantage of the photo printing ability of your printer? Make sure you change the settings to photo quality, purchase a pack of photo paper and print your favorite photos.

Put your printer to work for you. There are so many great coupons online, we no longer need to purchase newspapers, save junk mail and spend hours clipping. Websites like RetailMeNot.com, CouponQueeny.com and MoneySavingMom.com are dedicated to providing the latest retail and grocery coupons that you can use in your local stores. Make sure you change the printer settings to a lower, ink saving quality, and print coupons to save you money now.

Keep the children occupied. Print your own coloring books and puzzles, the preschoolers are sure to enjoy these on a rainy day. It may be Summer time, but you can keep the children learning and reviewing all year round with home work sheets.

How do you make the most out of your home printer?

The USB Cartridge: An Inventive Approach To Recycling

10. March 2010 12:24 by Danielle Bernhard in recycle cartridges, recycle, usb, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)









People concerned with the environmental impact of printing have several options.
They can return their empty ink cartridges to the manufacturer: brands like Epson run recycling programs free to customers. They can drop off their used cartridges at major retailers: stores like Staples pay $2-3 for each cartridge. They can even check if their city government collects cartridges: the Myrtle Beach Chamber of Commerce recently announced a program doing just that with Fisher Recycling, for example.


Alternately, people concerned with recycling can get creative! The folks at Instructables.com recently posted instructions for turning your empty ink cartridges into USB Flash Drives. The procedure requires little more than electrical tape and a knife – and is completely free! Best of all the – the USB cartridge slots into your printer. Perfect for storing confidential data under the cover!

Are there any other recycling tips you would suggest?

Man Proposes With Light Writing

22. January 2010 13:52 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, photography, print news, canon, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)









Most couples save the photo album for after the wedding. But when North Carolina resident Derick Childress stumbled upon a novel way to propose to girlfriend Emily, his Canon 7D digital camera saw some major use. To generate his light-writing proposal, Derick employed 2 friends and took more than 800 exposures over 3 nights.

Their website, derickandemily.com, hosts a Making Of video – but (perhaps thanks to links from Neatorama) it’s currently down.

Valentines Day is upon us, what romantic inspiration do you have?

You can remove the ink from your clothes

19. January 2010 10:40 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, printer help, ink cartridge, removing ink, inks, ink experts, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)
What to use to remove printer ink from your clothes.

We have all been there, whether you were trying to refill your printers ink cartridge or you simply left a pen in your pocket, you will need to get that ink out of your clothing.

The first step is to dab (not rub) the spilled ink with a towel, applying water and continuing until you see that ink is no longer removed by the towel.

Next leave it alone for a couple minutes (yes the waiting is the hardest part).

You may want to occupy your time watching a video, so you won’t think about it!




Once you have allowed a sufficient waiting period for the stain to air dry, dab the stain with rubbing alcohol, finger nail polish remover or even spray with hair spray, depending on what you may have on hand.


Use two new, clean paper towels, set the stained area on a towel and then dab the backside of the stain, pushing the ink onto the bottom towel. As the towel underneath begins to soak up the ink, move to a clean dry section. Continue until you see that ink is no longer removed by the towel.

At the end of the day, you should use a laundry pre-treatment soap, assuring that any remaining ink is removed in the wash.

Wash in the washing machine, using the warmest water level that the fabric can tolerate. If the stain does not come clean after washing, dab diluted bleach onto a towel and gently brush the stain clean. This should clean all ink out of your clothing.

The Step By Step Guide to Cleaning Your Printer

18. January 2010 14:08 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, ink cartridge, ink experts, printer cleaning, diy, printer problems  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)
Cleaning your inkjet printer can prove beneficial. To prolong the life of your printer and produce the best printed results, you should clean your printer on a regular basis. Printer and cartridge cleaning is useful for solving print quality issues and extending the life of your printer. In particular, if you are seeing lines or smudges on your print outs, you will need to clean the ink nozzles.

If you have the printer instructions, check for specific instructions. Many times you can also download the manual online.

If you do not have manufacturer directions, you can follow these simple directions.

1.) Turn off the printer and let it cool if necessary
2.) Remove paper
3.) Dampen a soft, lint-free cloth with a small amount of water
4.) Wipe the outside of the printer
5.) Dust the printer’s rollers or use a computer vacuum if available
5.) Look on your printer or in the printer software for the Head Cleaning option and initiate cleaning.

If your ink cartridges have been sitting in the printer without use:

1.) Soak your cartridge print head in shallow, warm water
2.) Remove after approximately 5 seconds
3.) Dry thoroughly with a paper towel
4.) Repeat if necessary until ink flows onto the paper towel.

From Print to Phone ... to Store

15. January 2010 12:21 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, bar code, electronic consumables, print, iphone, diy  //  Tags:   //   Comments (2)
We all know what the bar code is, many even scan items ourselves to price check at the super market or ring up our own items at the grocery store. Now you may be able to do so much more, including accessing a wealth of information directly from your mobile phone.

Esquire magazine will test this new functionality this March, by printing Scanbuy codes in an editorial spread on “The Esquire Collection”, detailing the 30 items a man would need to get through life, each item printed with a small bar code that readers can scan and view a mobile menu including advice for the item and information on where the item can be purchased.

ScanLife, an application available free for the iPhone [iTunes link], Blackberry, Androids and many other internet enabled phones, also can act as a bar code reader for ScanLife EZcodes anywhere, performing your own price comparisons on the go. Standard bar codes (QR-Codes) can also be read by an array of mobile applications.

Similarly, SpyderLink has introduced a more basic technology that will work with any camera phone. Client logos surrounded by a ringed logo, called a SnapTag allow consumers to snap a photo of the image and send it. In reply the consumer receives information such as videos, event details, coupon codes or other pertinent information. SpyderLink is a patent pending technology already in use in magazines such as Entertainment Weekly and Everyday Food.

These shopping innovations may be the way to help print ads evolve into the interactive mobile phone, social networking generation and allow consumers with the much sought after control.

HP Printer Ink More Costly Than Human Blood














Are you sick to death of the outrageous prices HP charge for their original black ink cartridges? You might avoid paying through the nose by purchasing from a remanufactured ink vendor. Or, if you’re hopelessly attached to the contents of the wallet, you might print documents with your own blood.

This, according to a bar chart created by Clementine at ReflectionOf.Me, is almost half the price of HP black ink # 45. All you need is an emptied ink cartridge and a blood donor pack. That woozy sensation you’re feeling as you fill the cartridge? That, dear reader, is what saving feels like - glorious, glorious savings.

Looking for details before you undertake this (admittedly drastic) procedure? HP’s black ink retails for $0.70 per mL, as opposed to $0.40 per mL for human blood. Need some liquid courage before you start? That’s no problem, because according to the bar chart, vodka retails for almost nothing. And if the whole thing goes wrong and you find yourself in the hospital – that’s okay too, because penicillin is only $0.05 per mL.

So get printing – and who knows? Before long HP might unveil its new ‘Vampire’ series.