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What is your favorite piece of art and what does it mean to you?

12. September 2013 15:26 by Danielle in clickinks, contest  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

You may have seen the question "What is your favorite piece of art and what does it mean to you?" posed recently for the Clickinks Scholarship Contest. For a small scholarship, we received many outstanding responses, and the decision to choose one winner was difficult. 

The submission from Marissa Brown really stood out. Her response was artistic, yet intelligent. I was touched reading her essay. You can read the essay in its entirety below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tear Me Apart by Linnea Strid. 2005. Oil on plywood. 28 x 30 cm.

Have you ever looked at a piece of art so detailed and lifelike that you at first brush it off as a beautiful photograph? Then, all of the sudden, it hits you that that is in fact a painting, not a photograph, and you almost feel sick with the amount of talent that person must have? That is how I feel when I look at each piece of art created by Linnea Strid. In particular, her painting Tear Me Apart shows immense attention to detail, a powerful emotion, and is overall simply a beautiful piece.

While in the International Baccalaureate program at high school, I took a higher-level visual arts class. Every week we had to write five pages in our Investigative Workbooks (IWBs) about anything and everything art related. Writing in these IWBs every week for three years meant that I researched and reported on many amazing artists that I would have never known about if I had not taken the time. Throughout all of those hundreds and hundreds of pages, Linnea Strid is one artist that stood out to me the most.

Linnea Strid is originally from Sweden, but spent a good portion of her life in Spain. This atmosphere is where her career in art began to flourish. She sold her first painting at the age of 16 (Chefas), showing that her artistic talent started early. She now lives in California and paints photorealistic oil pieces that are sure to blow your mind! (Another one of my favorites is Embraced by the Silence).

In her As It Falls Over You exhibition, Linnea is inspired by human emotions and the way water plays against the human form. The main emotions she focused on were “Mortality, fear of dying, fear of living. Loneliness. Anxiety in general” (Strid). I believe that because of these strong emotions, her artwork makes that much more of a statement.

When looking at this oil painting, the first thing that catches my eye is the obvious attention to detail. Being an oil painter myself, I know how much time goes into creating even a mediocre piece, so looking at something as intricate as this painting reflects much time and effort.
I love the realistic quality of the water running down her face – you can see the color of skin peeking through as well as all of the shades that a single stream of water has. Never again will you think that water is a simple shade of blue!
Looking closer you see the eyelashes matted together, heavy with water; the hair gripping to her skin… And these are just the physical features.

As striking and complex as Strid’s artwork is, it would be nothing without the emotion that pours through the canvas. You can see that this painting conveys a sense of frustration or sadness when looking at the slightly furrowed brow and the deep crease of the eyelid. The water streaming over her face takes place of the tears.
The composition of this piece is also what makes this a favorite of mine. It is not the typical view of a face; not all of it is shown and it takes up the entire canvas. This way there is no ignoring the emotion protruding from her features.

The color palette is also extremely unique and is one of the biggest reasons in why I enjoy this piece so much. The hair color in particular is what strikes me the most. It is not your typical blonde or brunette or even red color, it’s gray – almost white. And yet there is not sense of old age in the woman’s face. It is almost like the water is slowly draining her out.

This painting connects with me on a personal level as I feel that Linnea has pinpointed a physical setting of great emotion. Being in the shower or bath, feeling the water stream over you – it can be a place of great emotional release, of vulnerability and cleansing. I often seek the warmth and comfort of purifying waters during times of emotional strife. It seems that you enter weighed down and exit lighter and more composed. It is a place to sort thoughts, or simply forget for a few minutes.

Another reason that I find this artwork (and the rest of Linnea’s art, for the record) so stunning is, again, the photorealistic quality. I have attended art shows, art museums, and even art conventions such as Art Basel in Miami, and the question “What is art?” often arises. I believe that there is no one answer to this question, and that in the end art is in the eye of the beholder, so to speak. Therefore, I do have my own personal answer to this question: I believe that art is something that takes time and true attention to detail, composition, and color. I have a hard time looking at a scribble on a scrap of paper and understanding why not every other person in the world couldn’t do that. This is why Linnea is a favorite of mine – she is a true artist, in my book at least. I myself am an artistic person, but no matter how many hours of my time I spent, I could never obtain a fraction of her talent. It is something that I exceedingly appreciate.

Overall, this painting holds a place in my heart because of it’s striking beauty, evident emotion, personal connection, and attention to detail. Whenever I gaze upon this piece I cannot help but appreciate the talent that Linnea Strid holds and it encourages me to work harder at my own work – artwork or otherwise. Linnea has shown me that it is important to embrace your God-given gifts. I may not ever be as spectacular an artist as her paintings so portray, but I will work hard and develop what talent I do have; and that is an exciting topic of it’s own.


Works Cited
Chefas, Stephanie. "Art Chat with Linnea Strid." Platinum Cheese. Platinum Cheese, 9 Dec. 2011. Web. 26 Mar. 2013. <http://platinumcheese.com/2011/12/09/art-chat-with-linnea-strid/>.

How great to see Marissa so excited!

5 Ways to Save Money on Your Office Gadgets

28. May 2013 12:39 by Danielle in clickinks, office supplies, savings  //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments (0)

5 Ways to Save Money on Your Office Gadgets {Guest Post}

David Bakke is a small business owner, Internet reseller, and contributor for the popular personal finance blog, Money Crashers.

Whether you're a small business owner with a passion for digital technology or you're simply obsessed with grabbing the latest gadgets for yourself, there is tech temptation at every turn. The iPhone 5 was just released, as was the iPad 4. Just because the next latest and greatest gadget enters the market, however, doesn't mean you need to spend a fortune. In fact, there are ways that you can keep up with cutting edge technology without breaking the bank. Read on for some go-to money-saving tips for gadgets:

1. Purchase Online It's true that one of your best strategies to save on office gadgets is to look online. Use eBay or Amazon to begin with, but if you truly want to save, sign up for email updates from a website such as FatWallet or Slickdeals. That way, you can get an aggregate of all the deals both online and in-store where you can save the most money. Just be sure to factor in the shipping costs so you don't end up spending more money on online purchases than you would in-store.

2. Buy Used Shopping online is great, but take the idea to the next level by checking out used listings when you're shopping Amazon or eBay. You can sometimes uncover a deal where the product may be opened but it is virtually unused. Just because it's listed in the "used" category doesn't mean its tainted goods. It might be an item that was simply unwanted or one with a UPC code removed for a rebate promotion.

3. Track Clearance Sections This can involve a bit of leg work, but if you check out Staples, Office Depot, Office Max and Clickinks on a regular basis, you can find some nice items in their clearance section. These items aren't limited to traditional office supplies – you can even get display model laptops and other devices at significant discounts.

4. Go Without Although abstinence is never fun, sometimes it's best just to wait a while before making your purchase. You're never going to be able to keep up with all of the latest electronic releases, so your best bet may be not to buy new office gadgets at all. At the very least, wait unit the next model is released and you're going to save money by purchasing the previous model.

5. Sell Your Old Gadgets When you do upgrade your smartphone or other office gadget, be sure to sell your unwanted items. Amazon, eBay, and Craigslist are typically the best places to make a sale. Be sure you package your items safely and securely and ship them fast as well - you want to avoid getting returns.

Final Thoughts If you find yourself in the position of saving a few hundred dollars on a laptop computer, consider investing that money where it can do your finances the most good. If you don't have an emergency fund in place, start one. Got credit card debt? Get those balances knocked down. It's great to save on office gadgets, but using your savings in a meaningful way is even more important.

What ways can you think of to save on office gadgets?

How to save money when printing

11. April 2013 21:00 by Danielle in clickinks, how to save ink, paper saving  //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments (0)

With the evolution of home printing over the last decade, printing has now become more easily accessible than ever before. All but gone are the days of paying a print shop to print a simple document. Printing at home can save you time and money. With that being said, ink is still a pricey liquid that can really cut into the college student, or coupon clippers, budget. 

There are some smart ways to get the most bang for your buck when printing. 

Is your font eating up your ink? If you regularly use Arial, you could potentially use less printer ink by selecting Calibri, Century Gothic or Times New Roman as your default font. The amounts of ink used are generally determined by the thickness of the lines, so go light instead of bold for your prints.

Now that you have looked at your font, you may want to look at your default printer preferences. Select economy or draft mode if you are printing a casual note, or restaurant coupon, that does not require top quality, and you can save yourself money on those color inks.  If you have a commercial printer, you may also have the option to select duplex printing.  Selecting this option allows you to easily print on the front and back of each page, cutting your paper cost in half. Once you have changed your printer preferences, then go to print preview to make sure you are printing only what you need instead of printing headers, footers and anything else unnecessary.

Once you are using the least amount of ink and paper per print, you will want to find the lowest price on replacement ink cartridges.  You don’t need to purchase name brand ink cartridges, there are many stores, like Clickinks.com, that sell reliable remanufactured ink cartridges, at half the price. 

Most of us aren’t printing our own money, so apply these tips and you too can save more money when printing.

Decorate your cubicle photo contest

8. April 2013 15:51 by Danielle in clickinks, contest, facebook, free ink, giveaway  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Is ink getting expensive? Would you like to win $150 worth of the printer supplies you need from Clickinks.com! That's over a year’s worth of ink cartridges for the average consumer!

Are you stuck in a boring cubicle with no way out? Looking for a good excuse to exercise your creative side?

Are you tired of looking at that ugly printer on your desk that always flashes low ink?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, Clickinks has an answer for you!

Decorate your printer or cubicle, post a photo to Clickinks facebook page, and you could win $150 worth of the printer supplies from Clickinks.com! Bedazzle your printer, prank a co-workers desk for their birthday, or beautify your cubicle for the 4th of July! We want to see your creativity!

The Clickinks cubicle dwellers will be judge and jury, so aim to impress and you could win $150 worth of the printing supplies from Clickinks.com!

Interested cubicle dwellers and printer owners can submit a photo of their decorated printer and/or office cubicle by posting a photo to Facebook.com/clickinks now through July 5th, 2013.

 

 

And a little inspiration...

Halloween Cubicle:

Diaper Desk prank for a new Dad:

 

 

Easily Ordering the correct Ink Cartridges at Clickinks.com

Ordering online is easy, a time saving convenience most of us have discovered by now. Ordering ink online, something you don’t have to try on or look at, is brilliant.  The best part, you can stay stocked up and never have an annoying crunch time run to the store because you are out of ink. When a paper is due, or tickets need to be printed, you will be prepared. All you need is your printer model number. You can probably see that while you are ordering online.

To ensure that you place the order to suit your needs, follow these simple steps now.

Go to Clickinks.com

Type in your printer model number in the pink search bar

 

You will then be taken to a printer specific page, or if we need more information, we will list additional options to get you there.

On the printer page, you can verify the name of your printer model at the top. If you own this printer, your best option will be shown at the top. If you are looking for additional options, scroll down. When you find what you are looking for, click the quantity arrow above Add to cart.

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have selected the quantity of ink cartridges you would like to order, click Add to cart. If you need additional cartridges, continue shopping, otherwise you can proceed to view the cart & checkout.

Do you have a promotional code? At this time you can enter a Coupon Code, if you would like to use one.

Hint: Coupon Code: BLOGTIPS will apply 5% off your order of our inks.

Go ahead and enter this promotional code, then click "Apply Coupon: Click Here" to deduct your discount. If everything looks correct in your cart, click the arrow to proceed to our secure checkout.

Have you registered with our website yet? If not, now is the time to provide your name and email address, so that you can access your account when needed. If you have done this before, existing customers only need to enter their email address and password to login.

Once registered or logged in, you will be taken to Checkout. Enter your address for billing, and shipping if different.

Note: Shipping is free to street addresses in the continental US when you spend just $30.

Please scroll down to the Payment Method section. If you have any questions, please call 1-800-706 INKS or email contactus@clickinks.com prior to placing your order. If you have ordered from us previously, you may see loyalty points, in this case you can click the green button to apply those now. Please review the total, enter your payment information, and then click the blue Place order button.

Most orders ship out within 1 business day. As soon as your order ships, we will send you an email with a tracking number.

Other questions regarding ordering? Just let us know!

Staying Safe During The Season of Goodwill!

24. December 2012 04:57 by Neeru in Christmas, clickinks  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Now we don’t want to sound all ‘bah humbug’, but the holiday season is a time when you let your guard down a bit. There are a few more glasses of sherry than usual, there’s goodwill all around and a sense of celebration that makes you more vulnerable than usual. Here are our top tips for looking after your safety, your valuables, your home and your health over the festive period.

On the town

When you’re out celebrating try to make sure you do the following:

- Choose busy routes with good lighting when you’re walking

- Never take your car on a night out when you’ll be drinking – leave the keys at home

- Only use registered taxi firms and keep a number in your purse or wallet at all times

- Wear your bag with the strap across your body 

- Know how you’re going to get home at the end of the night.

On your own turf

Home Alone got one thing right; crooks love Christmas. Make sure you take the following steps to stop your gifts from going walkabout:

- Store your presents away from windows and out of view from the street

- Make sure your burglar alarm and outside lighting is in good working order

- Mark any new items with your postcode or take a note of the serial or model number

- Don’t keep your keys near the front door; persistent thieves have been known to hook them out through the letterbox. 

One the road

Keep yourself and your wheels out of trouble this year by making sure you:

- Never leave your car unattended while it’s defrosting

- Always keeping your doors and windows locked

- Make sure you keep valuables out of sight, or better still out of your car

- Watch your speed; Christmas roads call for vigilance due to ice patches and over-the-limit drivers. 

Final word:

Have a great Christmas! From everyone at Clickinks.com 

 

Can Kodak successfully rebound?

9. January 2012 11:03 by Josh in clickinks, kodak, kodak printer, photography  //  Tags: ,   //   Comments (0)

The Eastman Kodak Company’s stock price fell to a new low on Wednesday, as reports came in that the ailing company is about to seek bankruptcy court protection. This leaves many people questioning how Kodak could have fallen so far and so fast. Eastman Kodak, a technology titan of the industrial age, has been struggling for years. Kodak's cash crop of film and film processing was killed by digital photography and at home printing. The Wall Street Journal, quoting unidentified insiders, said Kodak is preparing for a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing "in the coming weeks".

As the market began to turn away from film cameras and more consumers started purchasing digital cameras, Eastman Kodak was in the position where they needed to diversify their technology offerings. Kodak began selling printers to consumers in 2007. Kodak’s strategy was to run counter to the industry's prevailing approach of offering a more expensive printer and cheaper ink. The majority of inkjet or laser printer manufacturers sell the printers at a loss in hopes of recouping their money on the sale of high priced ink cartridges and toner. (You can beat them at their game by buying your replacement ink cartridges from Clickinks.com.)

By 2010, the company held 3% of the all-in-one inkjet printer market world-wide, up from 1% in 2008. Kodak's strategy was to subsidize the business on the cost of the printers until its installation base was large enough to generate a proportional amount of ink sales. Still, because it’s proprietary ink refills were cheaper than its other OEM competition (HP, Canon, and Epson); Kodak was trying to sell its printers at a higher price than competitors. But as of last quarter, Kodak's innovative printers still weren't turning a profit.

Fear not, if you are a fan of Kodak. There is still a chance that the company will rebound, can avoid bankruptcy and continue making great printers and other products. But when it comes to your ink needs, Clickinks always offers all of the ink cartridges that you may require. Just go to Clickinks.com and save yourself some money and the environment in one simple internet transaction.

Find Inkjet Printer Cartridge Refill

1. October 2011 11:45 by Neeru in clickinks, compatible ink  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Since the inception of inkjet printer cartridges, prices have seemingly become steadily higher when buying inkjet printer cartridges at popular retailers. Companies have learned that once a consumer has already purchased an inkjet printer they are very likely to continue purchasing inkjet printer cartridges for it, even if the prices are steep.

A further tactic is that the companies that produce printers often ship them with printer cartridges that contain less ink that those sold separately. Indeed buying authentic inkjet printer products retail can make the prices of having photos printed professionally, and visiting the copy shop to print out documents rather attractive by comparison. For these reasons consumers are continually searching for the cheapest ways to purchase inkjet refill cartridges. An inexpensive option when purchasing inkjet refill cartridge options is to purchase remanufactured ink jet printer cartridges.

These are cartridges that have been refilled either by the original manufacturer, or more often third-party companies. The most expensive and polluting part of an inkjet printer cartridge is the electronic printer head. Remanufactured inkjet printer heads are one of the most optimal forms of recycling. Buying remanufactured inkjet printer heads, at a low price, is a great way to protect the environment, and get good value at the same time.

Another way for consumers in search of bargain deals on inkjet printer cartridge refills is to buy online. Because they do not need to maintain a large retail presence online stores can offer reduced prices on inkjet products, and often have clearance sales because they sell so many. When buying online consumers can save even more money while buying remanufactured inkjet printer cartridge refills at clickinks.

Also buying in bulk can yield even more savings. Further consumers can purchase products for non-inkjet printers, like laser toner, or specialty papers. It doesn't even take a very large order to see savings on shipping charges, and these combined with the savings on the price of inkjet refill cartridges themselves offer tremendous value for consumers shopping for inkjet printer cartridge refills on a tight budget.

How does a Laser Printer Work?

22. January 2011 06:00 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, drum unit, laser toner cartridges, laserjet, remanufactured toner  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
You may have a Laserjet printer, or have at least used one, but do you really know how a laser printer works?

In the beginning, the first printers attached to computers were impact printers, typically dot matrix. Everyone understood how these devices worked, as they functioned just like the electric typewriters of the time. A hard object struck an ink ribbon with enough force to transfer the ink onto the page. As technology evolved, along came the next generation, which included inkjet and laser printers. The inkjet printer works just like the name implies; an image is put on the paper by using microscopic jets of ink. The laser printer, on the other hand, is a bit of a mystery. How can a highly focused beam of light impart letters and images on a piece of paper? Is the laser inside my printer dangerous?

Following are the six key processes that happen inside a laser printer when you click print.

Charging: A charge roller (or corona wire in older machines) will project an electrostatic charge onto the photoreceptor. This is a revolving drum or belt which is capable of holding an electrostatic charge on its surface as long as it hasn't been exposed to wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation (and will be referred to as drum for the rest of this article).

Writing: A processor chip converts information for scanning onto the drum. The laser is aimed at a series of lenses and mirrors onto the drum. Lasers are used because they generate a coherent beam of light for a high degree of accuracy. Wherever the laser strikes the drum, it reverses the charge, thus creating a latent image on the surface.

Developing: The surface containing the latent image is exposed to toner, which is very fine particles of wax or plastic mixed with coloring agents. The charged toner particles are electrostatically attracted to the drum where the laser wrote the latent image.

Transferring: The drum is pressed or rolled over paper, transferring the image. Higher end machines use a positively charged transfer roller on the back-side of the paper to pull the toner from the photoreceptor to the paper.

Fusing: The paper passes through a fuser assembly, which has rollers that provide heat and pressure that bonds the toner to the paper.

Cleaning: When the print is complete, an electrically neutral rubber blade cleans any excess toner from the drum and deposits it into a waste reservoir, and a discharge lamp removes the remaining charge from the drum.

Each printer applies these steps in different ways. Most laser printers today actually use a linear array of light-emitting diodes to write the light on the drum. The toner is based on either wax or plastic, so that when the paper passes through the fuser assembly, the particles of toner melt. The paper may or may not be oppositely charged. The fuser can be an infrared oven, a heated pressure roller, or a xenon bulb. The warm up process that a laser printer goes through when power is initially applied to the printer consists mainly of heating the fuser element. Many printers have a toner-conservation mode which uses less toner but does yield prints with lower contrast. Color laser printers add colored toner in three additional, yet identical, processes.

So you now know that when you print that document, you are safe from a wayward laser beam melting a hole in your monitor and when it is time to get a replacement for that laser toner cartridge, you need to go to ClickInks.com. With your purchase of our remanufactured toner cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time.

The Home and Business Printer Glossary

Have you ever shopped for a printer wondering if you should pay extra for “PictBridge”? Shopped for an ink cartridge and gotten confused by the difference between “OEM” and “Remanufactured Cartridge”?  Or spoken to a graphic designer and felt clueless what the “pantone” in your print job was?  In an effort to assist with all your printer needs, we have assembled this Printer Glossary below.  Feel free to print and bookmark for reference.

All-in-One (AIO) - This is a multifunction printer that can also scan and copy. Many of these devices can send and receive faxes as well. These are sometimes referred to as multi function printers.

Anti-Aliasing - The process of removing or reducing the jagged distortions in curves and diagonal lines so that lines appear smooth or smoother.

Auto Answer - This is a setting on most fax machines, fax modems and multifunction devices with fax capability. With auto answer, the device automatically picks up incoming fax calls after a specified number of rings.

Automatic Document Feeder - A tray and/or attachment that feeds one page at a time into a fax, copier, printer, or scanner.

Bit - The abbreviation for binary digit; the smallest unit of digital information, represented by 1 or 0. Computers use many bits to represent information.

Bit Depth - A digital image is represented as a bit-map (a grid of dots). Bit Depth is the number of color tones that can be associated with each dot. A 1-bit color, for example, can only contain 2 colors: black and white. But an 8-bit color contains 256 shades (color or gray), while a 24-bit color contains 16.7 million shades.

Bitmap File - The standard graphics format carries the file extension .BMP.

Borderless Printing - Printing photos with no white space around the edges. Borderless prints look like the high quality prints from a photo lab.

Brightness - An adjustment to control the lightness and darkness of an image, measured by the percentage of reflected light.

Broadcast Faxing - A fax machine feature found on most all-in-ones that sends the same fax documents to multiple recipients.

Carriage - The fixture in the print device that holds the print head. Generally travels along carriage rods from side to side.

Central Processing Unit (CPU) – This is the portion of a computer system that carries out the instructions of a computer program, and is the primary element carrying out the computer's functions. The central processing unit carries out each instruction of the program in sequence, to perform the basic arithmetical, logical, and input/output operations of the system.

Centronics - A pioneering American manufacturer of computer printers now remembered primarily for the parallel interface and printer cable that bears its name. These cables are often referred to as Centronics cables.

Charging Roller - One of the complex systems of rollers inside a typical laser printer or all-in-one. The charging roller transfers an electrical charge to the photo conductor, which repels particles to the toner.

CMYK - An acronym to represent cyan, magenta, yellow and black, the basic colorants (dyes, pigments or toners) used in digital imaging. These four colors alone are used to create all colors in an image.

Collation - A feature offered on some inkjet printers, laser printers and all-in-ones. With collation turned on, multiple copies of a document are printed as separate documents.

Compatible Cartridges - A brand new printer cartridge that is made by a third party, not the OEM by the original printer manufacturer.  Compatible cartridges are widely known as a trusted, affordable option.

Contrast Enhancement (Automatic) - Automatically brightens images that appear dark or hazy, and applies appropriate tone correction to deliver improved quality and clarity.

Corona Wires - A set of thin wires inside the body of a laser printer that transfers a static charge to each sheet of paper; this charge in turn attracts the toner to the paper.

Dedicated Print Server - A computer in a network dedicated to managing all available printers.

Dot Matrix - An older impact printer that used a grid of tiny pins to transfer ink from a ribbon to the page. Dot matrix printers can produce basic graphics, but have inferior print quality compared to inkjet or laser printers.

Dots Per Inch (DPI) - A measurement of print resolution. DPI indicates how many individual dots a device can address on a page per square inch of area. DPI is typically listed as horizontal resolution by vertical resolution.

Driver - Software that comes with a peripheral that allows the peripheral to communicate with the computer.

Duplex - Printing both sides of a two-sided document on a single sheet of paper.

Drum unit - The photoreceptor in a laser printer which is electrically charged, rotating and  coated with organic photo conductors.  The drum picks up toner and then prints the image onto paper by direct contact and heat, which fuses the ink to the paper.

Enhanced Capability Port (ECP) - This is an international specification describing bidirectional communications using a computer's parallel port. ECP focuses on printers and scanners.

Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) - An international standard documenting bidirectional communications using a computer’s parallel port. EPP focuses on peripherals other than printers and scanner.

Ethernet Network - The simplest, slowest and least expensive network design, usually well-suited for home or small offices.

Fax Forwarding - A fax feature that enables the machine to automatically forward any document it receives to another fax.

Fax Header - An informational line of text printed at the top of every page by a fax machine; it includes a name, station ID and fax number.

FireWire - High-speed external connection used for connecting peripherals, also referred to as "IEEE 1394".

Firmware - Low-level software that runs in a digital camera, printer, scanner, etc. and controls the product's operation and user interface.

Font - A set of printing characters that share the same distinctive appearance. Fonts are used on a computer to display text on the monitor and print documents.

Fuser Roller - One of a system of rollers inside a laser printer. The fuser roller heats the page after the toner is applied, so the toner partially melts and sticks to the page for a permanent bond.

GIF Image - Short for Graphics Interchange Format; usually carries the file extension .GIF. The first truly universal standard format for file images, originally developed by CompuServe. Widely used on the web, GIF files are best used for small images in limited colors.

IEEE-1284 Standard - The international design specification for bidirectional parallel printer cables. Most inkjet and laser printers do not work properly unless the printer cable meets this specification. Most products now use USB for printer-to-computer communication.

Impact Printer - A class of printer that uses the force of an impact into an ink ribbon to create a printed character on a page. This impact is delivered by a rotating ball or wheel or through a grid of pins. This type of printer is generally slow, noisy and out-dated. These printers are useful for multipart forms such as invoices or shipping bills.

Individual Ink Cartridges (IIC) - Some inkjet manufacturers printing solution that has a different ink cartridge for each color.

InfraRed (IR) - This is a type of connection that allows data to be wirelessly transmitted from one device directly to another device when the infrared window on the camera is lined up with an infrared sensor on the other device. This technology is similar to what most TV remote controls use.

Inkjet Cartridge - An inkjet cartridge is a replaceable component of an inkjet printer that contains the liquid ink (and sometimes a print head, micro-chip and other technology and moving parts).


Inkjet Printer - A printer or an all-in-one unit that shoots fast-drying ink through tiny nozzles onto a page to form characters. The inkjet is currently the standard for personal computer printing. Inkjets are fast, affordable and quiet. They provide high-quality graphics and print in color.

Input/Output Card - Usually abbreviated I/O card. A standard computer adapter card that typically provides two serial ports for your modem and two parallel printer ports.

Interrupt Request - Usually abbreviated IRQ. A signal generated by an adapter card in the computer that alerts the CPU to handle incoming data from the keyboard, mouse, serial port or parallel port.

JPEG File - Usually carries the file extension .JPG. The current favorite image format among web surfers and graphics professionals, JPEG images are highly compressed to save more space than a .BMP or .GIF file.

Label Stock - A paper sheet carrying peel-off or perforated labels that are arranged in a specified pattern.

Landscape Printing - Printing where the longer length of the page runs from side to side rather than top to bottom. Landscape mode is often used to print spreadsheets and larger photographs.

Large-format Printer - An inkjet printer designed to handle paper sizes of 11x17 inches or larger. Some large-format printers also use continuous rolls of paper. These printers are generally designed to produce photo-quality posters, blueprints, maps, banners and signs.

Laser Printer – This is a device that uses static electricity and heat to bond particles of toner to the page to create the characters. This is the same technology used by many copy machines and is known as a best option for large businesses.

Local Area Network (LAN) - A group of computers in an office or building connected to one another by cabling. A network computer can access files on other computers in the network or enable others to open and use its files. Printers, modems and hard drives are also typically shared peripherals on a network.

Media - The material that the ink is printed upon, such as plain paper, mailing labels or transparency film.

Monochrome Printer - A printer that prints in only one color, usually black. Some monochrome printers can also produce text and graphics in shades of gray, as well as strict black-and-white.

Network Interface Card (NIC) - An adapter card installed in a computer that enables it to connect to a network; most NICs support several different types of networks and network cabling.

Network Printer – This is a printer available for use by all of the workstations on a network. A network printer either has its own built-in network interface card or it is connected to a printer server on the network.

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) - Products or components that are manufactured or purchased by a company and retailed under that company's brand name.

Page Description Language - A language recognized by computers and printers that define the physical characteristics of a page, including fonts, graphics, margins, spacing and colors.

Page Memory - The number of pages a fax can hold in its memory if it runs out of paper.

Pages Per Minute (PPM) - A measurement of printer speed, indicating how many finished pages a printer can produce over a 60 second period. PPM speeds are typically listed for both black-only and mixed text and color documents.

Page Storage – This is the number of pages (text or graphics) that can be stored internally on the given device.

Pantone - A color matching system supported by most desktop publishing and graphics design software.

Paper Capacity - Refers to how much paper the printer tray can accommodate.

Paper Guides - Adjustable plastic dividers that help hold paper in the proper alignment in a printer's paper feed tray. These guides can be moved to fit different dimensions, such as international sizes, envelopes or custom-sized paper.

Parallel Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. I/O adapter cards are available that can provide a computer with up to four separate parallel ports, but most computers come with one as standard equipment.

Peripheral - This is a device attached to a host computer, but not part of it, and is more or less dependent on the host. It expands the host's capabilities, but does not form part of the core computer architecture.

Peer-to-Peer Network - A simple network design that uses no file or printer servers. All workstations on the network are connected by cabling, which enables users to share files and hardware, such as printers.

PictBridge - PictBridge allows digital cameras, camcorders and other image-capture devices to connect and print directly to photo printers and other output devices; no computer is required.

Pixel - A single element within a digital photograph. The typical digital photograph is made up of several million pixels.

Port Connection - A communication link between hardware components. Types of connections include FireWire, Parallel, USB, Serial, and SCSI.

Port Polling - A procedure performed by Windows® each time the computer is booted and each time a print job is sent from an application. The operating system automatically checks the parallel port to make sure that a printer is ready to receive a print job. In many cases, port polling can be turned off to improve printing speed.

Print Buffer - A separate, standalone print spooler with its own built-in memory that connects a computer and printing hardware. The print buffer can spool print jobs, freeing up all of a computer's resources for applications.

Printer Cartridge - The device that integrates the print head, ink container and ink delivery systems.  A printer cartridge may contain ink or toner.

Printer Driver - The software that enables the operating system to properly build and format commands and data bound for the printer; in effect, a printer driver tells the operating system all it needs to know to successfully operate the printer.

Printer Emulation - This is software that enables a newer printer to act like an older, widely used printer so it can recognize and print documents formatted for that older model.

Printer Server - A computer solely dedicated to supporting a network printer. The server's system RAM and hard drive are used to store print jobs in the queue, and print jobs can be reordered, paused, or deleted from the server's keyboard.

Print Head - This is the element of a printer that applies the ink to the paper. In an inkjet device, the print head contains the nozzles and electronics that control the ejection of the ink onto the selected media.

Print Quality - A qualitative description of how pleasing printed output looks. Most printers enable the user to adjust the quality of print and the speed of printing. In general for inkjet printers, slower print speeds will result in higher print quality.

Print Resolution - The quantity of data capable of being printed, typically measured in dots per inch (DPI). Higher resolution is one of many factors that can improve print quality.

Queue - A sequence of documents sent to a printer to be processed sequentially, usually in the order in which they were sent by the computer.

Remanufactured Cartridge - ClickInks.com’s remanufactured cartridges are made from recycled cartridge cores. Each cartridge is cleaned, inspected and refilled to conform to strict ISO 9001 quality standards and meet or exceed OEM specifications. Remanufactured cartridges from ClickInks.com contain the same amount of ink or more as the OEM ink cartridges, and print the same number of pages.  Remanufactured cartridges are widely recognized as a more affordable and environmentally friendly option, keeping empty cartridges out of landfills

Serial Port - This is the common name for one type of printer connector on the back of a typical computer. This is a physical interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time.

Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) - Set of standards for physically connecting and transferring data between computers and peripheral devices.

Thermal Dye Sublimation - In dye-sublimation printing, the dyes vaporize and permeate the glossy surface of the paper before they return to solid form, creating a gentle gradation at the edges of each pixel. The color infuses the paper and is less vulnerable to fading and distortion over time.

Tri-Chamber Cartridge – This is a descriptive term for a singular inkjet cartridge that contains all three colors of ink; cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY).  Often marketed as a tri-color cartridge.

Universal Serial Bus (USB) - A fast input/output (I/O) data transfer standard used for connecting peripherals to a computer. Typically, each device connected to a computer uses its own port. USB can connect up to 127 peripherals through a single port, and peripherals can be connected together. USB devices may be hot swapped, which means that power does not have to be turned off to connect or disconnect a peripheral. USB has become the primary means of connection for printers and other peripherals, and is supported by most major hardware, software and telecommunications providers.