The Clickinks Blog | Hewlett Packard

Ink Installation Instructions

If you are installing an HP 564, HP 920, Canon BCI-3, Canon BCI-6, Canon PGI-5, Canon CLI-8, Canon PGI-220, Canon CLI-221 or similar inkjet cartridge, these instructions are available to walk you through the process.

Printer Driver Downloads

12. October 2010 05:00 by Danielle Bernhard in find printer, clickinks, Hewlett Packard, brother printer, hp, print, driver, epson printer  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)
It is so nice to get a new computer, but often with this gift, we inherit the task of loading an old printer, which we have no longer kept the drivers for.  Printer drivers allow the operating system to communicate with and run the printer.  You can find any driver you need on-line, if not through your operating system. 

Select your printer brand below, then you can download the correct driver for your printer model and operating system.

Name Your Printer - Winner Announcement

What printer model do you use?  Clickinks asked, and our customers answered.  There are a lot of new and old Epson Stylus inkjet printers out there, as well as numerous HP printers.  Canon, Kodak, Lexmark and Brother Multifunctions showed up, too.  Kodak owners seem to like their printer for the great pictures and Brother owners seem to like their printers for everything else.  And by quick observation, dude no one got a Dell.   

We offered 1 lucky winner from Clickinks Facebook and Clickinks Twitter fan pages replacement ink for their printer, and are so excited to announce the winners.




























Jewel Nickolisen of Nebraska will receive her Epson Stylus CX6600 ink and David O'Mara of Idaho will receive ink for his Epson Stylus CX8400.

Thanks for playing, and follow along for more great chances to win your ink!

Does Your City Government Encourage Ink Recycling?

Recently the Myrtle Beach Chamber Of Commerce in South Carolina announced a venture with local company Fisher Recycling. Together they will encourage ‘green’ policies among businesses in Myrtle Beach. Fisher Recycling will audit waste and provide recycling bins for materials including glass, aluminium and plastic. Of course, this latter category includes ink cartridges.

Individuals can opt into Fisher Recycling’s curbside collection route. The initiative will reduce the waste that goes to landfill, and is convenient for people seeking to dispose of waste responsibly. This includes people concerned with the environmental impact of printing.

Hence it is worth asking: Has your city started a similar initiative? If so it is worth exploiting! If not – perhaps it is worth asking why not!

If you fall into the second category, there are other ways to recycle ink cartridges. Staples reportedly pays $3 for every cartridge received. In addition, brands like Canon run recycling programs, free to their customers. These are listed below:

You Can Help the Environment by Supporting Responsible Corporations

Are you concerned about the environmental impact of printing?

There are several ways to maximize your positive impact on the planet. For example, print only when necessary, and avoid reprints by ensuring you’re satisfied with the page first. Alternately, remove unwanted elements from websites using applications like PrintWhatYouLike.com. This application lets you remove superfluous adverts and images from internet pages before printing. It’s an excellent way to save ink – and keep the planet healthy.

Buying from responsible corporations also makes a good contribution. For example, Hewlett Packard recently topped Corporate Responsibility Magazine’s 100 Best Corporate Citizens List. Hence HP fulfils their obligations to the planet more effectively than anyone in subjects including: Climate Change, Environment, Human Rights and Corporate Governance. Buying HP printers then, supports their positive policies. It’s an indirect way to make printing greener, and something to consider when buying a new printer.

Are there any other ways of making a positive impact through printing you’d like to know about?

To see Corporate Responsibility Magazine’s complete list of responsible corporations, click here.

Inkjet Wars: Kodak vs HP

Kodak entered the printer market in '07 with a revolutionary business plan: charge slightly more for inkjet printers than other manufacturers, but charge half the price for ink cartridges.

They released the EasyShare 5300: an inkjet with cartridges 50% cheaper than HP’s equivalent model, the PhotoSmart C5180. They launched a full ad campaign, warning consumers that ink cartridges sold by other manufacturers cost more than crude oil.

Moreover, Kodak employed a new pigment-based dying process in their printers, which certified their images for 120 years. This contrasted favorably with the single year guaranteed by Hewlett Packard. Finally, Kodak promised they’d save consumers $110 annually.

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In 2007 Kodak sold 520,000 printers. Impressive? Not really, when you consider that 61 million inkjet multifunction printers were sold that year.

Yet the Kodak entry caused red alert at Hewlett Packard headquarters - both because Kodak aimed a stake at the heart of HP’s business model, and because Kodak targeted the most profitable consumers.

After all, Kodak’s promises of incredible savings wouldn’t mean anything to consumers for whom printers are dusty plastic boxes. It’s the printing maniacs – that 20% of inkjet consumers who purchase 80% of cartridges – with whom Kodak’s new strategy might resonate.

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Since then, the two brands have been firing back and forth at each other. Kodak designed the (possibly Star Trek influenced) printandprosper.com to accompany their EasyShare launch.

This website details the savings available with Kodak, and explains why other printer brands are soulless profit mongers. Hewlett Packard receives the worst beating from this campaign - arguably because the 63 cartridges types available from HP contrast with the 3 from Kodak.

In reply, Hewlett Packard launched The Truth About Printing – a site targeted like a cruise missile at Kodak.

It illustrates an infinite queue of frowning Kodak consumers desperate to return their EasyShares, and promises $50 toward an HP printer. That’s the printing equivalent of removing your gloves.

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More recently, this tussle has moved off the net and into the courts. Last year HP filed a complaint with the lengthily titled National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (his friends call him NAD) that Kodak’s claim to save consumers $110 annually was inaccurate.

Kodak failed even to send a representative to the complaints proceeding. Instead, they released a short press statement saying their advertising claims had already been substantiated.

NAD responded by bundling the case off to the Federal Trade Commission.

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Last December, the FTC decided that Kodak could claim their $110 savings – but on a minimum of four pages printed daily.

This tweaked text recognizes that consumers must guzzle an ink minimum before Kodak’s claims become viable. Kodak has asserted this alteration to their advertising vindicates them.

On the other hand, Hewlett Packard continues firing back. They most recently quoted a Lyra Research report that 50% of consumers never reach Kodak’s savings threshold.

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Who then does provide the cheapest printing? And do Kodak’s (seemingly) lower priced cartridges compromise quality? Comparisons of Kodak and Hewlett Packard’s printers are available through Google, though they report different things.

Broadly speaking – Kodak’s EasyShares give equal quality to HP’s PhotoSmart series, so long as Kodak photo paper is employed. This however cuts the potential savings of Kodak’s ink cartridges. By comparison, the PhotoSmarts offer a more vibrant printout – but degrade quickly.

Therefore neither brand is the undisputed champion of printing – putting to one side the minefield of ink cartridge pricing. The division between Kodak and Hewlett Packard will continue - while the consumer watches on, uncertain.

Printer Review: The HP OfficeJet 4500 Completes Your Home Office

23. February 2010 14:24 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, Hewlett Packard, hp, wireless printing, office printer  //  Tags:   //   Comments (2)








Does your home office suffer from a burning absence of professional quality color printing and 4 in 1 functionality? Have you sought for an integrated printer, copier, scanner and fax machine – but been put off by the massive prices of existing models? If so, the expansion of HP OfficeJet range may spark your interest.

The newly announced Hewlett Packard OfficeJet 4500 starts at $99 - making it HP’s “most affordable” all-in-one printer. 100 sheets of paper slot beneath its piano black chassis, and it prints 6 pages per minute. The recommended output per month is 3000. Meanwhile, the 1200dpi scanner includes a 20 page document feeder.

The more costly 4500 Wireless version comes with WiFi connectivity for consumers opposed to USB cables. Both versions will cut your electric bill – they’re Energy Star qualified. Finally, HP promises that printouts using ColorLok paper dry extra quickly.

Commenting in the Press Release, HP’s Vice President of Inkjet Business Solutions Hatern Mostafa said: “HP believes in the entrepreneurial spirit and strives to create products that help customers turn their ideas into reality.” Of course, this applies to people whose idea is saving space and money at their home office.

Summary

Release Date: March 2010

Manufacturer: Hewlett Packard

Features: Printer, Copier, 1200dpi Scanner, Fax machine, 20 page automatic document feeder, Wifi connectivity, Fast drying ink, Energy Star qualified.

Pages Per Minute: 6

Operating Systems: Windows 7 and Mac OS X Snow Leopard

Ink Cartridges: Black - $14.99 (200 sheet capacity) and $31.99 (700 sheet capacity), Color - $21.99 (360 sheet capacity)

Printer Brands Pledge Millions to Haiti Relief

21. January 2010 09:54 by Danielle Bernhard in clickinks, Hewlett Packard, print news, canon, hp, facebook, haiti relief  //  Tags:   //   Comments (1)
Many U.S. companies have pledged Six-figure sums to aid Haiti relief in the last week. According to a frequently updated list by the Chamber of Commerce, among the larger contributors are: Microsoft, which has donated $1.25 million, and Pepsi, which is pledging $1 million.


Other contributors include Crocs, which is donating thousands of pairs of shoes, and Nestle, which has donated $1m in bottled water.

Leading printer brands are also adding to Haiti relief. According to a 15 January press release by Hewlett Packard, the household name has contributed $500,000 to the American Red Cross International Response Fund.

HP will also match $250,000 in contributions from its employees, coming to a possible $750,000.

The Canon Group has also pledged $220,000 to aid victims of the earthquake, which struck Haiti last week.

Speaking in the Canon Press Release, President and Chief Executive Officer at Canon USA Joe Adachi said: "A tragedy of this magnitude requires support from the global community and it is our hope that our contribution, along with all of the aid coming in from around the world, will help the people of Haiti begin the rebuilding and healing process."

According to the 17 January report at USAToday.com, US donations are set to exceed the $2b pledged after the Asian tsunami two years ago.

Notable pledges outside the corporate world include: $1m contributed by Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie to Doctors Without Borders, and $500,000 contributed by The New York Yankees.

Sal Fabens of United Way Worldwide says that cash is the most useful pledge, because donations of food etc. may not be able to reach the disaster-struck areas.

If you’d like to pledge Haiti relief, you’ll find information at the Haiti Earthquake Recovery Facebook page.

HP Printer Ink More Costly Than Human Blood














Are you sick to death of the outrageous prices HP charge for their original black ink cartridges? You might avoid paying through the nose by purchasing from a remanufactured ink vendor. Or, if you’re hopelessly attached to the contents of the wallet, you might print documents with your own blood.

This, according to a bar chart created by Clementine at ReflectionOf.Me, is almost half the price of HP black ink # 45. All you need is an emptied ink cartridge and a blood donor pack. That woozy sensation you’re feeling as you fill the cartridge? That, dear reader, is what saving feels like - glorious, glorious savings.

Looking for details before you undertake this (admittedly drastic) procedure? HP’s black ink retails for $0.70 per mL, as opposed to $0.40 per mL for human blood. Need some liquid courage before you start? That’s no problem, because according to the bar chart, vodka retails for almost nothing. And if the whole thing goes wrong and you find yourself in the hospital – that’s okay too, because penicillin is only $0.05 per mL.

So get printing – and who knows? Before long HP might unveil its new ‘Vampire’ series.

Epson Conquers The Printer Cable With iPhone App

For years the printer cable was a tether by which the computer user was kept in spitting distance of their Epson printer. A slave were they to the length of that copper wire. But no longer. For, according to a December 14th, 2009 press release from Epson, owners of network capable Epson printers, including the Artisan 810 and Workforce 610, will be able to print their images wirelessly. The means of this freedom? Nothing less than Epson’s very own iPrint Application, for use with the iPhone.


The Epson App is available from the iTunes App store, seated alongside similar releases from rival brands. Earlier this year both Hewlett Packard and Canon enabled their customers to cast away their printer cables, so long as they own iPhones. The Apple device comes equipped with a sixth sense, meaning that it’s capable of automatically identifying printers in your network. It does this with WiFi. Yet persons seeking this printing freedom ought beware: according to a December 14th 2009 post by Ragu Magapann at TheStandard.com, the quality of images produced on the iPhone is mediocre.