The Clickinks Blog | All posts by neeru

Clickinks Photography competition

22. March 2013 10:14 by Neeru in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Calling all photographers! From seasoned pros to amateurs, Clickinks wants to hear from you! We are running a photography competition; the theme is “new beginnings” 

We are giving away $100 and the chance for you to have your photograph professionally printed on a gallery wrapped 24” x 16” canvas!

Who can enter?

The competition is free to enter, and open to all living in USA or Europe.

How to enter

To enter, either email your photo to feedback@clickinks.com or post the photo on Facebook and tag Clickinks via our Facebook page.

There are some rules:

Please only send us a photo that you've taken - you must own the rights to it.

If you're chosen as the winner, we'd like to publish the photo on our site in a blog post (but we won't publish it anywhere else).

The photo can be of any subject matter you like (but please, nothing rude!) 

The deadline is  June 5th 2013 at 9am and the winner will be announced shortly afterwards. 

Only one entry per person - so choose only your favorite. Good luck!

Competition is open only to The United States of America and Europe. 

 

- Due to the popular response, we have decided to extend the competition until the 5th June 2013.

Clickinks Guide to ALSC Awards

22. March 2013 10:10 by Neeru in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) was established by the American Library Association in 1941 to promote and improve library services to children and teens. In its early years, it was restructured and renamed three times, becoming the modern ALSC in 1977. Since its inception, it has grown to include more than 4000 members including children’s librarians, literary experts, publishers, and education and library faculty.

One of the most high profile ways the ALSC encourages children to read is through its awards and medals. Every January, it praises authors, illustrators and their works with more than 15 accolades. These are all prestigious in their own right, selected as they are by the distinguished members of the ALSC, though some are more well known than others. 

Among the most famous of these awards is the Newbery Award. Given to a work that has proved a significant contribution to children’s literature, the Newbery has been awarded to classics such as Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, Sarah Plain and Tall, and A Wrinkle in Time.

The Caldecott Medal is awarded to the most outstanding children’s picture book. It has been given to Make Way for Ducklings, Where the Wild Things Are, and Jumanji.

The Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award goes to a person who has contributed significantly to children’s literature, be they author, critic or teacher of children’s literature. Recipients are then invited to give a lecture on children’s literature. Honorees include Michael Morpurgo, Maurice Sendak and Philip Pullman.

The Batchelder Award selects a book originally written and published for children in a language other than English and in a country other than the United States. The American publisher that translates into English and publishes in America the outstanding book wins the prize. Winners have included Charles Scribner's Sons for Don’t Take Teddy by Babbis Friis-Baastad and Walker and Company for The Baboon King by Anton Quintana.

The Belpré Medal celebrates the work of Latino or Latina writers and illustrators who celebrate Latino culture and experience in children’s literature. Victor Martinez, author of Parrot in the Oven: Mi Vida, and illustrator Yuyi Morales are among those who have won this.

The Carnegie Medal goes to the producer of the best children’s videos. This has included So You Want to be President? and Eric Carle: Picture Writer.

Established in 2006 and named after Dr. Seuss, the Theodor Seuss Geisel Medal is awarded to both the author and illustrator who has made an outstanding contribution to beginning readers books. Winners have included Cynthia Rylant and Sucie Stevenson in 2006 and Mo Willems in 2008.

The Odyssey Award honors the best audiobooks for children and has been awarded to The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian and Rotters.

The Sibert Medal is given to the best informational book for children. It has been awarded to Kakapo: Saving the World’s Strangest Bird and The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights.

The Wilder Medal, named after Laura Ingalls Wilder, honors people whose books or literary artwork have made a lasting impression on children’s literature over a period of years. It was initially given to Laura Ingalls Wilder herself and has since been awarded to Beverly Cleary, Maurice Sendak, Theodor S. Geisel and Eric Carle.

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards highlight the outstanding books that demonstrate an appreciation for both African American cultural experience and universal values. It has been given to Mother Crocodile: An Uncle Amadou Tale from Senegal and The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Schneider Family Book Award acknowledges books for children and young adults that have discussed the experiences of disabled people. Winners have included A Mango Shaped Space and The Deaf Musicians.

The Printz Award is given to the author of the best book written for teens. Among these is Kit’s Wilderness and American Born Chinese.

The Margaret A. Edwards Award is bestowed upon writers whose works have made a lasting impact on literature for young adults. Recipients include Judy Blume, Terry Pratchett and Madeleine L'Engle.

The Alex Award is given to 10 books annually that, although written for adults, appeal specifically to older children and teens. These include Water for Elephants, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and Stardust.

The Best Books for Young Adults list is an annual compilation of the best books for young adults. From that list, 10 books are then highlighted as particularly noteworthy. Books such as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone  and The Hunger Games have been included on these lists.

Of course, everyone agrees that encouraging children to read is a good thing, as it improves academic performance, communication skills and concentration. These awards help encourage the next generation to have as many readers as possible, ensuring these benefits and many others will continue to improve the lives of children throughout the United States.

Clickinks Guide to 19th Century Russian Artists

21. March 2013 13:00 by Neeru in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Russian art in the 19th century went through three distinct phases. In the early part of the century, Russian artists followed the European techniques and styles, so they largely focused on the Romanticism aesthetic. Towards the middle of the century, artists shifted towards ideological realism, and the end of the century saw artists move towards the Russian or Slavic revival as the culture of Russia moved inwards.

Romanticism

Russian Romanticism was the result of Russian artists’ feeling that Europe was superior in the arts. This attitude saw Russian artists going to Western Europe to learn to emulate their styles and techniques. Like most of Europe at the time, Russian artists preferred the romantic aesthetic. Portraits, self portraits and depictions of historical events were the prevailing subjects.

Karl Bryullov came to prominence in this period. Born in Italy, Bryullov was raised and educated in Russia. Despite his classical training, he never really liked the classical style he was taught to use, and he introduced more nationalistic, less neoclassical elements into his work. This allowed more artists to look to Russia for inspiration, giving rise to the next phase in Russian art.

Ideological realism

After the emancipation of the serfs in 1861, art began to be produced for the masses. Artists felt it was their role in society to create works that would speak to and instruct everyone, giving peasants a moral and social education and giving voice to social criticisms against the more well off. While subjects began to focus on Russian heritage, the techniques used were still largely influenced by Europe.

During this time, a group of artists left the Russian Academy of Arts, which at the time was the arbiter of style and taste in Russia. The artists who left formed Peredvizhniki (the Travelers or Itinerants), so named for their travelling exhibitions. They became disillusioned with the academy, feeling it didn’t understand what Russian artists wanted or needed to do. This break led artists to look back, calling up more historically Russian subjects.

Russian (Slavic) revival

The next logical step for Russian art was the Slavic revival. The late 19th century saw a conflict between those who wanted to align themselves more closely with Europe and those who wanted to find inspiration in Russia itself. The Slavic revival  found inspiration in Russia’s medieval art and the culture and traditions of the Russian peasants. Folk tales, heroic epics and the iconography of the Orthodox church proved fertile grounds for artists.

The subject matter was immensely popular with the newly rich industrialists of Russia. They began financing the artists, who in turn founded art colonies throughout the country. This new collective spirit led to a new cultural movement, called Mir iskusstva (The World of Art). It included painters like Alexandre Benois, Konstantin Somov, and  Léon Bakst, who began pushing art into new directions.

At the end of the century, the Russian avant-garde movement came to the forefront. The 20th century brought its own movements, not least because of the Russian Revolution, but the cultural shift away from Europe and towards Russia itself as a rich source of inspiration changed the art world in Russia irreversibly. 

Clickinks Guide to African American Writers

21. March 2013 09:55 by Neeru in   //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

/> <p><br /></p></break> <p>African American writers have been producing work since they first came to the United States. Before the 18th century, most writing focused on spiritual narratives. In the 18th century, African American writers began to rock the boat, capturing the experiences of slaves and forcing slave owners and accomplices to face their actions. Writers in the 19th century began to write more prolifically, looking at the impact of the Civil War on the newly freed slaves. The 20th century saw a creative boom in African American writers, inspired by the Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights movement. In the 21st century, African American writers have begun to expand into genre fiction and other forms of writing.</p> <h2><span lang=

During the 18th century, many African Americans were slaves, ex-slaves or generally ignored by the public. There are therefore few African American writers from this time period, but the ones who were able to write are groundbreakers.

Phillis Wheatley was the first African American woman to publish a book and the first African American poet. In the 1760s, she was kidnapped in Western Africa and sold into slavery. She was taught to read and write, and in 1773 she wrote a collection of poems, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. It gained national attention, even coming to be praised by George Washington.

Lucy Terry wrote the oldest known work of fiction by an African American. She was kidnapped in Africa and sold into slavery as an infant. Her freedom was purchased by Abijah Prince, a freed African American man, whom she then married. Her work, “Bars Fight” is a ballad about an attack by Native Americans on two white families in an area known as The Bars.

Jupiter Hammon was the first African American to be published in the then newly independent United States of America (Wheatley’s collection of poems was first published in London before being published in the United States). A poet who was born into slavery, he never experienced emancipation, but in his famous Hammon address he said, "If we should ever get to Heaven, we shall find nobody to reproach us for being black, or for being slaves."

The 19th Century

The Civil War had been fought, and the slaves were freed. Many more African Americans had access to good quality education, and many authors wrote about the struggles of ex-slaves, both when they were enslaved and when they were freed.

W.E.B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass, and Booker T. Washington are perhaps the most famous African American authors at this time. Du Bois was the first African American to earn a doctorate, graduating from Harvard, and he was a founder of the NAACP. He wrote prolifically about what he called the “Negro Problem”, how African Americans felt about being considered problematic in society.

Douglass became famous after publishing his autobiography about his life as a slave. White society was shocked to discover that slaves could be compelling and eloquent, and he took advantage of his new-found fame to promote equal rights for all people.

Washington, unlike Du Bois and Douglass, was born in the Deep South and was intimately acquainted with the feelings of southern white people to their newly freed slaves. His writings were collections of his speeches trying to advance the causes of African Americans across the country.

Other writers were working at this time as well. Octavia V. Rogers Albert interviewed former slaves in Louisiana to use as the basis for her book The House of Bondage. Like Washington, Charles Chesnutt wrote about the experience of ex-slaves in the post-Civil War south, but much of his work was fictionalized. Elizabeth Keckley was a freed slave who became the seamstress of Mary Todd Lincoln. Keckley wrote a book about her work with Mrs. Lincoln called Behind the Scenes. William Wells Brown wrote the first novel written by an African American, Clotel, which was published in London, where he lived at the time.

The early 20th Century

The 20th century saw many African American writers come to the forefront of the literary world. The Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights era created a fertile ground for writing.

Anne Spencer spanned the gap between the writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. She socialized with Langston Hughes,  Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and W. E. B. Du Bois, among many others, and she was the first African American to have her poetry included in the Norton Anthology of American Poetry.

Langston Hughes wrote in just about every format, but he was particularly feted for his work in poetry. He brought musical sensibilities to poetry, giving rise to the jazz poetry that helped define the style of the Harlem Renaissance.

Zora Neal Hurston was famous during the Harlem Renaissance, but her work had fallen out of favor for several decades. She was reintroduced to the world in 1975 by Alice Walker, and she has stayed in the canon of American literature ever since.

James Baldwin wrote in the middle of the century, publishing his first book in 1955. His work explored the racial, sexual and class distinctions of his time, looking particularly at the unspoken rules that governed people’s behavior.

The late 20th and very early 21st Century

It is early into the century, so most writers today have also written in the 20th century. These days, African American authors are no longer restricted to issues relating to race, instead exploring genres like horror and sci-fi in fiction and contemporary issues in poetry.

Maya Angelou is the legendary poet, essayist and autobiographer well known for her book I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. That book was a crucial contribution to African American feminism literature.

Toni Morrison has written many novels, including Beloved. She has received many awards for her writings, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Alice Walker is most famous for writing The  Color Purple, in which she uses the backdrop of 1930s Georgia to explore issues facing women and African Americans.

Rita Dove is the first African American to serve as the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and the second African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Her writings include On the Bus with Rosa Parks.

ZZ Packer was highly lauded as an up and coming writing talent in her youth, and her subsequent output has proved that early praise correct. She has written Drinking Coffee Elsewhere and is currently the Writer-in-Residence at Tulane University.

Samuel R. Delany is a renowned science fiction author. Winner of four Nebula and two Hugo awards, he has written titles including Babel-17, Nova, and the Return to Nevèrÿon series.

David Anthony Durham concentrates his talent on the historical fiction and fantasy genres. His notable titles include Gabriel’s Story, which follows African American settlers as they make their way out west, and the Acacia Trilogy, an epic fantasy trilogy that is praised for its fully developed alternate world and the way it turns many fantasy tropes on their heads.

New Beginnings Poetry Competition Winner!

13. February 2013 03:49 by Neeru in contest, poetry, winners  //  Tags: , , ,   //   Comments (0)

We are pleased to announce the winner of our poetry competition on New Beginnings is Forrest Brunet! Congratulations!

Thank you to everyone who took part. The standard of entries was extremely high and it was a pleasure to read them. 

Here is Forrest's poem:

Strings

I don’t remember who we used to be, all the memories are fading away

So here i am, begging for the right to listen. Will you just play me our song, 

Then maybe i can move on with all our strings intact?

 

Standing in meadows, wind brushing away the past

Laughter poured down like rain, swept the scars down through the gates

Our hands no longer holding because now isn’t the time for foolery

 

Cracked lips make broken smiles, delicate curves no longer fitting perfectly

pictures burn in the open fire, we became ashes when letting go was our only option

did we not know that there was another way to forget the pain we caused?

 

I don’t remember who we used to be, all the memories are fading away

So here i am, begging for the right to listen. will you just play me our song, 

Then i might move on with all our separate strings intact

 

There’s a line from a song we used to sing, i don’t believe we can start over again

Tears were whipped away and cries were left behind, does that mean war is ended now?

Everything fell into place then out again, but there must be something beyond these walls

 

Now here i play, our remix, a story of life. with these cords and every note

A melody we used to share, these lyrics mean nothing without each other

But that doesn’t matter to you, so just pay attention, you can’t miss what i need to say…

 

I don’t remember who we used to be, all the memories faded away

So here i am, begging for you to listen. i’ll play you our song, 

Then finally move on with all my strings intact

A Clickinks Introduction to Victorian Art

31. January 2013 10:10 by Neeru in Victorian Art  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Victorian ArtThe Victorian era, from 1837 to 1901, marks out the reign of Queen Victoria. The British Empire was at its height and the Industrial Revolution was underway, giving the British nation an unprecedented period of prosperity and national confidence. The Victorian era saw a move from the rationalism of the Georgian period towards romanticism and mysticism in broader society. This was, of course, then reflected in the art of the period.



The decorative and visual arts of the Victorian period incorporated the revival of historic romantic styles with the Asian aesthetics that were becoming more prevalent because of the reach of the British Empire. They used these styles to explore ideas of the self, nature, life events, tragedy and emotions and other romantic ideals, like the role of art in, and the responsibility of the artist to, society.

John Everett Millais and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

John Everett Millais was one of the founding members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, one of the most influential British art groups of the Victorian era. The original group – Millais, D.G. Rossetti and William Holman Hunt, later joined by W.M. Rossetti, James Collinson, Frederic George Stephens and Thomas Woolner – felt that art had become too stylized and untruthful since the early Renaissance, so they looked to a time before the emergence of Raphael to find inspiration for modern art. They started by painting the opposite of whatever the Royal Academy was teaching its students. If the academy taught students to paint with one major source of light, deep shadows and soft colors, the Pre-Raphaelites painted a brightly colored scene that was flooded with light.

Millais was arguably the best known of the group, though perhaps not the leader of the movement. He gained entry into the Royal Academy at the remarkable age of 11. It was there that he met Hunt and Rossetti and formed the Brotherhood. Initially his style was controversial. He painted Christ in the House of His Parents, which depicted Jesus and his family in their poorly furnished, untidy home. This caused a major outcry, as it was seen as vulgar in its depiction of the holy family as normal, poor people. After marrying his wife and starting a family, he began to paint in a less confrontational style. He was described as a sell-out by some, while others complimented his growth, citing an artistic connection to Whistler and other artists.

Joseph Paxton and Victorian architecture

Joseph Paxton is one of the best known Victorian architects, not least because he designed the famous Crystal Palace for the Great Exhibition. Paxton fell into architecture: he started his career as a garden boy, and, after becoming the protégé of his employer, the Duke of Devonshire, moved into garden and eventually building designs. It was his experience designing greenhouses that inspired both the design of the Crystal Palace and his passion for incorporating steel into buildings.

It was the introduction of steel and other products resulting from the Industrial Revolution that allowed Victorian buildings to scale new heights and become more ornate than previous buildings. Victorians could create with metal and paint the ornamentations that previously could only be done by stonecutters and painters working meticulously. This led to a revival in elaborate styles, including Gothic Revival (typified by St Pancras station in London), Renaissance Revival (such as the Central Library in Edinburgh) and Romanesque Revival (seen in The Natural History Museum in London).

Julia Margaret Cameron and the rise of photography

Julia Margaret Cameron was born in Calcutta in 1815 and was likely introduced to the photographic process by her friend and renowned developer of photography Sir John Herschel. She immediately began working on the various aspects of creating photographs, from staging compositions to developing the film and assembling photo albums. It was not until she was 48, however, that she received her first camera. She quickly began experimenting with techniques, scratching negatives, printing from cracked or smudged negatives, and photographing things out of focus. These techniques were highly criticized by some, but she also was awarded with many prestigious honors, including a gold medal in 1866 in Berlin.

Although photography had been developed at the beginning of the 19th century, the processes of capturing and developing photographs were constantly being improved. Still, from the very beginning, photographers tried to advance photography as an art form, leading the first photographers to capture images that depicted religious icons, landscapes, contrasts in light and other typically artistic subjects.

The Great Exhibition

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations was an international exhibition held in 1851. The first in a series of World’s Fairs, it was organized by  Henry Cole and Prince Albert to showcase the advancements of the time, and especially those of Great Britain. The exhibition’s aim was to ultimately show that Britain was the undisputed leader in the industrial age. Among the more than 13,000 displays were Mathew Brady’s daguerreotypes, Samuel Colt’s newest revolver, a precursor to the fax machine and a reaping machine from the United States.

The Crystal Palace was built to house the exhibition. Taking only nine months from concept to finished building, the glass and cast iron building covered 990,000 square feet and saw six million people come through its doors during the exhibition. The invention of cast plate glass, which was cheaper and stronger than other glass, allowed the structure to be completely clear. It was the most glass many of the visitors had ever seen, creating a dazzling impression that led to its name. After the exhibition closed, the palace was moved to Sydenham Hill, but was reconstructed in such a different way that it was almost unrecognizable as the home of the Great Exhibition. It continued to be used after the Victorian era, notably being the site of the Festival of Empire in 1911 which marked the coronation of George V. Soon, the costs of maintenance became too high, leading the building to fall into disrepair. Eventually, the building was destroyed by a fire in 1936.

The end of the Victorian era saw the introduction of aesthetic movements like the Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Anglo Japanese styles. All these artworks and new developments have had a lasting impact on British society, both in the art world and in the public world in general.

Clickinks Poetry Competition!

10. January 2013 05:07 by Neeru in contest, poetry  //  Tags: , , ,   //   Comments (0)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the start of the New Year we all become focused on making resolutions and turning over a new leaf.  This is why we would like you to write a poem on ‘new beginnings’. 

The competition is open to applicants of all ages, whether you are a budding or experienced writer, we want your poems!

It can be written in any style, as long as it’s no more than 45 lines and must be your own work.

The winner will receive $100 worth of Amazon vouchers, to spend on whatever you wish! 

To enter, email feedback@clickinks.com by midnight EST on February 11, 2013. 

Guidelines: 

•    Poetry theme: New Beginnings 

•    Open to everyone worldwide

•    No entry fee

•    Must be the original work of the entrant

•    No more than 45 lines

•    Poems must be in English

•    Deadline: 12:00 am on Monday, February 11, 2013 

Staying Safe During The Season of Goodwill!

24. December 2012 04:57 by Neeru in Christmas, clickinks  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

Now we don’t want to sound all ‘bah humbug’, but the holiday season is a time when you let your guard down a bit. There are a few more glasses of sherry than usual, there’s goodwill all around and a sense of celebration that makes you more vulnerable than usual. Here are our top tips for looking after your safety, your valuables, your home and your health over the festive period.

On the town

When you’re out celebrating try to make sure you do the following:

- Choose busy routes with good lighting when you’re walking

- Never take your car on a night out when you’ll be drinking – leave the keys at home

- Only use registered taxi firms and keep a number in your purse or wallet at all times

- Wear your bag with the strap across your body 

- Know how you’re going to get home at the end of the night.

On your own turf

Home Alone got one thing right; crooks love Christmas. Make sure you take the following steps to stop your gifts from going walkabout:

- Store your presents away from windows and out of view from the street

- Make sure your burglar alarm and outside lighting is in good working order

- Mark any new items with your postcode or take a note of the serial or model number

- Don’t keep your keys near the front door; persistent thieves have been known to hook them out through the letterbox. 

One the road

Keep yourself and your wheels out of trouble this year by making sure you:

- Never leave your car unattended while it’s defrosting

- Always keeping your doors and windows locked

- Make sure you keep valuables out of sight, or better still out of your car

- Watch your speed; Christmas roads call for vigilance due to ice patches and over-the-limit drivers. 

Final word:

Have a great Christmas! From everyone at Clickinks.com 

 

10 Halloween Printables For Kids!

31. October 2012 05:09 by Neeru in print, printing  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

When it comes to using your printer to keep your little ones entertained, you can’t go far wrong with colouring-in sheets. Halloween is a great opportunity for a little print and colour-in session, whether you opt for haunted houses, Draculas or zombie bunnies for your own little monsters to decorate.


But did you know your printer has a lot more potential for keeping kids entertained - especially during the exciting Halloween holiday season? Below you’ll find ten printable ideas for Halloween fun, which your children are bound to go batty for!

1. Halloween Countdown Calendar

Simply print out this countdown calendar and pop it on the wall, then use a marker to count down to the spookiest day of the year. This is an easy way to build excitement and should help younger children to get to grips with numbers.

2. Pin the Tail on the Cat

We’re all familiar with pin the tail on the donkey, but this fun printable version gives that party favourite a Halloween twist. Simply print out the friendly-looking black cat and stick it on the wall - or better yet on a pin board - with some blue tack. Then print the matching tails and attach a drawing pin to each. It’ll be down to the blindfolded children to find the right place for the tails!

For an extra bit of fun why not surround the picture of the cat with balloons, which will pop with a bang when your little ones miss completely? You can print out the cat itself here and the matching tails for pinning here.

3. DIY Spooky Masks

A grown-up will be required to help younger children to cut out these masks but they can then be coloured in with pens, pencils or paints and made to look really festive. You may want to back them on durable card if your children are keen to wear the masks - they can then be secured with ribbon, string or elastic - ready for a good trick or treat session!

 

4. Creepy Crosswords

Your kids might not be up to The Times Crossword yet, so why not ease them in with these child-friendly Halloween versions? There are a few difficulty levels to choose from including the super-tricky one. As such they could be a great way to keep children amused while you enjoy a little me-time…

 

5. Monster Mazes

Mazes are great ways to keep children entertained and can be fantastic brain-training exercises too. You can encourage your children to attempt them in pencil in case they take a wrong turn, though an alternative could be to print out a few copies for failed attempts. For competitive types you might even want to make completing the maze a race! We’ve found this playful pumpkin maze and this spooky skull maze for them to try.

6. Plan a Party

If your little monsters are keen to get their little monster friends round for a Halloween party you’ll be needing some suitably spooky invites. This printable Halloween party invite is nice and colourful and has lots of space for all the details. Encourage your children to fill them in themselves to get some good handwriting practice in.

7. Woo-Oooo Word-searches

Being cooped up on a rainy afternoon can drive little ones crazy, so having a word-search lined up can be a lifesaver. To give some added motivation why not challenge your children to find all the words within a certain amount of time - and award a prize for any who manage it? This selection of Halloween-themed word-searches comes with different levels of difficulty, enabling you to select the right one for your child’s age and ability…

8. Pumpkin Patterns

No Halloween is complete without a well-lit pumpkin or two. Make yours extra decorative and super-spooky with these printable patterns. Once they’re printed you can trace them onto the pumpkin and cut out the shapes, though obviously smaller children will need a hand with the cutting part.

9. Spooky Stencils

If pumpkin carving seems a little too ambitious for you and your brood, why not try an alternative use for stencils? These basic Halloween stencils can be printed and cut out for decorating all sorts. For example, you can use them with temporary glass paint to decorate the windows of your home. Or alternatively you can print them onto more durable card and cut them out for use decorating cupcakes with icing sugar or cocoa powder!

10. Fancy Dress Without Dressing Up

 

Even if you don’t have time for fancy dress this Halloween, there’s no need for your children to miss out entirely. These adorably designed paper dolls can be cut out using child-friendly scissors, to deliver lots of dressing-up fun. There are boy and girl designs to choose from, and each comes with cute little accessories - such as lantern trick or treat baskets, pirate eye patches and fairy wings!

10 Halloween Printables For Kids!

31. October 2012 05:09 by Neeru in print, printing  //  Tags:   //   Comments (0)

When it comes to using your printer to keep your little ones entertained, you can’t go far wrong with colouring-in sheets. Halloween is a great opportunity for a little print and colour-in session, whether you opt for haunted houses, Draculas or zombie bunnies for your own little monsters to decorate.


But did you know your printer has a lot more potential for keeping kids entertained - especially during the exciting Halloween holiday season? Below you’ll find ten printable ideas for Halloween fun, which your children are bound to go batty for!

1. Halloween Countdown Calendar

Simply print out this countdown calendar and pop it on the wall, then use a marker to count down to the spookiest day of the year. This is an easy way to build excitement and should help younger children to get to grips with numbers.

2. Pin the Tail on the Cat

We’re all familiar with pin the tail on the donkey, but this fun printable version gives that party favourite a Halloween twist. Simply print out the friendly-looking black cat and stick it on the wall - or better yet on a pin board - with some blue tack. Then print the matching tails and attach a drawing pin to each. It’ll be down to the blindfolded children to find the right place for the tails!

For an extra bit of fun why not surround the picture of the cat with balloons, which will pop with a bang when your little ones miss completely? You can print out the cat itself here and the matching tails for pinning here.

3. DIY Spooky Masks

A grown-up will be required to help younger children to cut out these masks but they can then be coloured in with pens, pencils or paints and made to look really festive. You may want to back them on durable card if your children are keen to wear the masks - they can then be secured with ribbon, string or elastic - ready for a good trick or treat session!

 

4. Creepy Crosswords

Your kids might not be up to The Times Crossword yet, so why not ease them in with these child-friendly Halloween versions? There are a few difficulty levels to choose from including the super-tricky one. As such they could be a great way to keep children amused while you enjoy a little me-time…

 

5. Monster Mazes

Mazes are great ways to keep children entertained and can be fantastic brain-training exercises too. You can encourage your children to attempt them in pencil in case they take a wrong turn, though an alternative could be to print out a few copies for failed attempts. For competitive types you might even want to make completing the maze a race! We’ve found this playful pumpkin maze and this spooky skull maze for them to try.

6. Plan a Party

If your little monsters are keen to get their little monster friends round for a Halloween party you’ll be needing some suitably spooky invites. This printable Halloween party invite is nice and colourful and has lots of space for all the details. Encourage your children to fill them in themselves to get some good handwriting practice in.

7. Woo-Oooo Word-searches

Being cooped up on a rainy afternoon can drive little ones crazy, so having a word-search lined up can be a lifesaver. To give some added motivation why not challenge your children to find all the words within a certain amount of time - and award a prize for any who manage it? This selection of Halloween-themed word-searches comes with different levels of difficulty, enabling you to select the right one for your child’s age and ability…

8. Pumpkin Patterns

No Halloween is complete without a well-lit pumpkin or two. Make yours extra decorative and super-spooky with these printable patterns. Once they’re printed you can trace them onto the pumpkin and cut out the shapes, though obviously smaller children will need a hand with the cutting part.

9. Spooky Stencils

If pumpkin carving seems a little too ambitious for you and your brood, why not try an alternative use for stencils? These basic Halloween stencils can be printed and cut out for decorating all sorts. For example, you can use them with temporary glass paint to decorate the windows of your home. Or alternatively you can print them onto more durable card and cut them out for use decorating cupcakes with icing sugar or cocoa powder!

10. Fancy Dress Without Dressing Up

 

Even if you don’t have time for fancy dress this Halloween, there’s no need for your children to miss out entirely. These adorably designed paper dolls can be cut out using child-friendly scissors, to deliver lots of dressing-up fun. There are boy and girl designs to choose from, and each comes with cute little accessories - such as lantern trick or treat baskets, pirate eye patches and fairy wings!