The Clickinks Blog | All posts by josh

Can Kodak successfully rebound?

9. January 2012 11:03 by Josh in clickinks, kodak, kodak printer, photography  //  Tags: ,   //   Comments (0)

The Eastman Kodak Company’s stock price fell to a new low on Wednesday, as reports came in that the ailing company is about to seek bankruptcy court protection. This leaves many people questioning how Kodak could have fallen so far and so fast. Eastman Kodak, a technology titan of the industrial age, has been struggling for years. Kodak's cash crop of film and film processing was killed by digital photography and at home printing. The Wall Street Journal, quoting unidentified insiders, said Kodak is preparing for a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing "in the coming weeks".

As the market began to turn away from film cameras and more consumers started purchasing digital cameras, Eastman Kodak was in the position where they needed to diversify their technology offerings. Kodak began selling printers to consumers in 2007. Kodak’s strategy was to run counter to the industry's prevailing approach of offering a more expensive printer and cheaper ink. The majority of inkjet or laser printer manufacturers sell the printers at a loss in hopes of recouping their money on the sale of high priced ink cartridges and toner. (You can beat them at their game by buying your replacement ink cartridges from Clickinks.com.)

By 2010, the company held 3% of the all-in-one inkjet printer market world-wide, up from 1% in 2008. Kodak's strategy was to subsidize the business on the cost of the printers until its installation base was large enough to generate a proportional amount of ink sales. Still, because it’s proprietary ink refills were cheaper than its other OEM competition (HP, Canon, and Epson); Kodak was trying to sell its printers at a higher price than competitors. But as of last quarter, Kodak's innovative printers still weren't turning a profit.

Fear not, if you are a fan of Kodak. There is still a chance that the company will rebound, can avoid bankruptcy and continue making great printers and other products. But when it comes to your ink needs, Clickinks always offers all of the ink cartridges that you may require. Just go to Clickinks.com and save yourself some money and the environment in one simple internet transaction.

Ink Spill in Boston

16. March 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

We have all had bad mornings and maybe spilled the coffee on the way out the door. Maybe the kids dropped their cereal bowl full of fruit loops. Neither of those messes compare to what happened outside of Boston last week.

A tractor-trailer carrying industrial printer cartridges rolled over leaking ink across a highway ramp in Peabody Massachusetts. No other vehicles were involved and the driver was unharmed in the crash. Approximately 16,000 pounds of ink cartridges were bound for an industrial printer in Maine. Workers are removing the ink by laying sand over the ink, which soaks it up, and then sweeping the sand away. The ink is non-flammable, but workers are wearing protective gear to avoid skin contact.

See, don’t you feel better already! Don’t you worry though; Clickinks.com uses Fed Ex and the USPS for our shipping. None of our high quality remanufactured ink cartridges were harmed in this incident.

Modernist Cuisine Weighs in at over 4 lbs of ink

25. February 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments (0)

We are going off script here today with something a little different. While this might be considered a book review, I look at it as a tribute to modern printing and publishing. This is what can happen when money, imagination and curiosity collide. With a release date of March 7th, Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking might be the most highly anticipated book of this millennium.

Modernist Cuisine is a six-volume, 47-pound epic collection (list price $625) that could easily pass for a graduate level science text, dispelling many of the myths that exist in the food world. Its release has been delayed for months because the one of a kind Plexiglas case that houses the volumes was cracking and breaking under the astonishing weight. The ink used to print the text and pictures weighs in at over 4 pounds; that’s more than the average book weighs, paper and all.

“Every one of the traditional publishers balked at the scope of this project,” says Dr. Nathan Myhrvold, the multi-millionaire author and inventor, “which is why I had to found my own publishing company to get it done.” Fortunately, he was the former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft and the current CEO of Intellectual Ventures, a 5 billion dollar patent portfolio development company. Myhrvold had the resources to bankroll his own publishing company, which he named The Cooking Lab.

A comprehensive, well-researched book is one thing, but what's the appeal for the everyday home cook? Simply, this is the most useful cookbook you'll probably never cook from. Oddly enough, that does not make the books inaccessible. There might not be a recipe you will make in every chapter, but there is something to inspire and learn from on every single page.

With its sizeable price tag, the book may not be for most, but Myhrvold insists there is something for everyone. “Chefs will certainly be interested," he said. "The book contains a lot of techniques that it would be really difficult to learn any other way. You would have to work at a dozen different restaurants around the world." It's also appealing to those with an "intellectual curiosity," claims Myhrvold. "People who love books say this is really an extraordinary object."

This release is going to be a turning point as to how people think about food and technology. If Myhrvold would have added a chapter or two about football, that would cover just about everything that interests me. I’ve already started printing excerpts I’ve found online, but I’ve used up my black inkjet cartridge. I’m not going to find all 2,438 pages online, nor would I want that many loose pages in my kitchen, so I’m going to have to stop soon. The good thing is that I know that I can save up to 86% by buying remanufactured inks from Clickinks.com. So now you know what to get me for my birthday, it’s in June if you were wondering. It’s your pick, inkjet cartridges from Clickinks or Modernist Cuisine, I’ll take either one.

Pressing Forward: The Evolution of Printing Devices

9. February 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

What would Johannes Gutenberg think of today’s modern laser printer? Would he even recognize it as an evolution of his invention that changed the world? Most historians believe that the printing press was the single most important invention of the Middle Ages. Gutenberg conceived the idea of a movable type and the first printing press. It should be noted that the printing press is not the result of a single invention, it is the aggregation of three different technologies that were in existence centuries before Gutenberg was born.


• The adaptation for printing of the wine or olive oil screw-type press that had been in use for hundreds of years, throughout Europe and Asia.

• The adaptation of block print technology, known in Europe since the return of Marco Polo from Asia at the end of the 13th century.

• The development of mass production paper making techniques. Paper was brought from China to Italy in the 12th century, but was thought too flimsy for books.

The first few books to be printed and sold at print shops were religious texts and bibles. There was very little to no printing of new ideas taking place. Most people entered the printing business and then quickly left it. The main reason was the distribution of books was not organized. The potential for improvement was there, the market was there, and the demand was definitely there, but the control and transport were poorly organized. To add to this, the literacy rate in Europe was still very low. Most people did not even know how to read. However, this situation was improved by the Frankfort Fair, which was a center for printing and drew hundreds of booksellers, scholars, publishers and collectors from all over the world.

Printing encouraged literacy amongst the population and eventually brought about a deep and lasting impact on many people’s lives. The majority of the first books made by hand were typically the Bible. The print shop on the other hand, responded to demand with medical, travel and practical manuals. Printing also provided a platform for scholars and prevented the corruption of their texts during hand copying. By giving everyone the same texts to work from, the printing press had brought about progress in science and scholarship in a faster and more reliable way.

The main effects of the printing press however, was to multiply the supply and cut down the costs of books. Thus, it made information of all kinds readily available to larger segment of the population. Libraries were then able to store more information, and at a lower cost. The printing press also facilitated the preservation and dissemination of knowledge. This was very important for the advancement of science and technology. The printing press certainly fueled the start of the ‘information revolution’, which is on par with the Internet of today. The printing press allowed the spread of new ideas and information quickly, and with much greater impact.

Initial success with automatic printing was found with the steam printing presses of the early 1800's. This was the next major step for the printing industry. Gutenberg's original design had remained largely unchanged until then. The steam press, constructed of cast iron, allowed double the print size and required 90% less force to print properly. It could produce 250 prints an hour, an amazing feat for the era. Compare that to today's fully automated digital printing presses, which are capable of handling any color, font and print size at a printing rate that makes the steam press look like a snail.

So in the span of five centuries, we have witnessed human expression evolve from the spoken word, to the hand written word, to printed word. Now with today’s electronic mediums, our communication has evolved to what has become the digital information age. The internet’s effect on communication is causing us to rethink text itself. It has almost come full circle and returned to a state much like it was in its infancy of the spoken word. I am confident that if Johannes Gutenberg were alive today and needed toner for his laser printer, he would web-surf over to ClickInks.com. With the purchase of Clickinks remanufactured printer cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time!

How to Remove Toner from Your Clothes

8. February 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , , ,   //   Comments (0)

If you have been keeping up with our blog, you have read about laser printers and gained a basic understanding of toner. But what do you do if you spill toner in your printer? Or even worse, spilled toner on your clothes or skin?

If toner spills into your laser printer or copier, a special type of vacuum cleaner with an electrically conductive hose and a HEPA filter is needed for safe and effective cleaning. These are called electrostatic discharge-safe (ESD-safe) or toner vacuums. Toner particles have electrostatic properties by design and can develop static-electric charges when they rub against other particles, or the interiors of transport systems and vacuum cleaner hoses. Because of this and the small particle size, toner should not be vacuumed with a conventional home vacuum cleaner. Static discharge from charged toner particles can ignite dust in the vacuum cleaner bag or create a small explosion if sufficient toner is airborne. This could possibly damage the vacuum cleaner or start a fire. In addition, toner particles are so fine that they are poorly filtered by regular household vacuum cleaners and can blow through the vacuum motor and into the room. At this point you would have taken what was a small spill and created a larger mess by spreading the toner particles across the entire room.

If you shook your toner, or spilled toner in your printer, there is a strong chance that some of it got onto your clothing. Unfused toner is easily removed from most clothing, as long as you are capable of cleaning it in a washing machine. Because toner is a wax or plastic powder with a low melting temperature, it must be kept as cool as possible until you are able to wash it. It is best to remove the article of clothing to avoid the transfer of toner onto other surfaces and your skin. The water temperature of the wash cycle must be set to cold only. Do not wash anything else with the affected garment. Using multiple wash cycles will improve your chance of success at removing the toner. For the first cycle, you may want to use dishwasher detergent. For the additional cycles you should use regular laundry detergent. Residual toner floating in the rinse water of the first cycle may remain and necessitate multiple wash cycles. If it was a large amount of toner spilled on the garment, you may want to remove it from the washing machine and run a second cycle to remove any excess toner from the washing machine basin. Avoid using the clothes dryer or an iron until all of the toner has been removed.

If you have toner on your clothing, you may have also gotten some of it on your skin. You are going to need to follow the same principles as removing it from your clothes, avoiding heat at all costs. Your first reaction is going to be to try and brush the toner off your skin, but you don’t want to do this. The act of brushing the loose toner off of your skin will result in friction, which can create heat, which could fuse the toner to your skin. Shake as much of the loose toner off as possible. Next you will want to use soap and cold water. Once again you are going to have to assure that you turn the water to cold.

If you have spilled ink instead of toner on your clothes, check out this article on How to remove the ink from your clothes.

By following these steps you should have the mess cleaned up without any permanent reminders of the spill. Now that you have accomplished that task, go ahead and order your next toner cartridge from Clickinks.com. With the purchase of our remanufactured toner cartridges, you can save yourself money and stop shaking that toner.

What is Toner?

Every day we print using a laser printer at work or handle come across documents that have been printed with toner. The most common questions are what is toner, and how does it work? Why does it cost so much, and how can I reduce my costs?
Toner is the powder used in laser printers and photocopiers to form the printed text and images on the paper. Toner granules are melted by the heat of the fuser which allows it to bind to the paper. In its early form it was simply carbon powder. In an effort to improve the quality of the printout, modern toner has the carbon particles mixed with various polymers to allow for better dispersion onto the drum.


In earlier designs, the carbon toner was poured by the user from a bottle into a reservoir in the machine. Usually a sizable amount of the toner was wasted, as it was virtually impossible to not spill some of it during the refilling process. Current machines feed directly from a sealed cartridge, which is usually a proprietary design. The specific polymer used today varies by manufacturer but can be a styrene acrylate copolymer, a polyester resin, a styrene butadiene copolymer, or a few other special polymers. Toner formulations vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and even from machine to machine. Typically formulation, granule size and melting point vary the most.

Originally, the granule size of toner averaged 14–16 micrometers. To improve image resolution, granule size was reduced, eventually reaching the current 8–10 micrometers for 600 dots per inch resolution. Further reductions in granule size producing further improvements in resolution are being developed through the application of new technologies. Toner has traditionally been made by compounding the ingredients and creating a slab which was broken or pelletized, then turned into a fine powder with a controlled granule size range by air jet milling. This process results in toner granules with varying sizes and aspherical shapes. To get a finer print, some companies are using a chemical process to grow toner granules from molecular reagents. This results in more uniform size and shapes of toner granules. The smaller, uniform shapes permit more accurate reproduction and more efficient toner use. Toner manufacturers maintain a quality control standard for granule size distribution in order to produce a powder suitable for use in their printers.

Now that you know what goes into that toner cartridge, and understand why they cost what they do, go ahead and order your next toner cartridge. Keep in mind the price is much less at ClickInks.com; with the purchase of Clickinks remanufactured toner cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time!