The Clickinks Blog | All posts by danielle

How Does a Printer Work

No matter what type of document you are printing, whether if it’s a letter, spreadsheet, PDF or a photo, and no matter what type of printer you are using there are some similarities in how your printer works. The software is responsible for sending the data to the printer; this software is known as the driver. The driver translates the data from the application into a format that the printer understands, the driver also checks to see if the printer is connected, turned on, and functioning properly.  There are two major types of printers, the laser printer and the inkjet printer.

How a Laser Printer works:

For the laser printer there is a basic principle which is static electricity. A revolving drum which is known as a photoreceptor which is made out of conductive materials that sends light photons, as it revolves it receives an electrical charge from a wire that is called a charge corona, while it spins a tiny laser beam shines across it surface to discharge at various points to create the image on the drum.

Once the image is set, the printer puts a positively charged toner on the drum. The toner then will only stick to the negatively charged areas.

After the toner is adhered to the image on the drum, the paper is moved into position. The paper encounters the transfer of the corona wire and receives a negative charge. The negatively charged paper has a stronger pull than the static electric charged toner that is holding to the drum, the paper pulls the toner powder from the drum transferring the image to the paper once the image is transferred from the drum; a detac corona wire zaps the paper to remove it from the drum.

Finally the paper is ready for the fuser. The fuser permanently bonds the image into the paper. The paper passes threw the fusers which are just heated rollers.  As the paper passes threw the fuser heats up the toner powder and bonds it with the paper, then the fusers sends the paper out of the printer.

How an Inkjet Printer works:

For the inkjet printer, it uses miniscule droplets of ink to create the image. The ink comes from an ink cartridge that is placed in the print head assembly, inside the print head assembly there is actual print head which has several nozzles that spray drops of ink. An Inkjet printer also contain a print head stepper motor which a mechanism that moves the print head across the paper.
There are two types of inkjet printers:

Bubble Jet Printer:  The resistors create heat, which the heat vaporizes the ink into tiny little bubbles and the bubble is pushed out onto the paper. The bubble jet print head can contain 600 nozzles and they all can fire a drop of ink simultaneously.

Piezoelectric printer: Piezo crystal is found at the back of the ink reservoir which vibrates when it receives an electric charge. The vibration from the crystal will force the ink out of the nozzle.

This is a quick and simplistic view on how the most common printers work.  Do you have questions on your printer? Just let us know!

Enter your Father Now to Win Clickinks Father's Day Competition!

10. June 2011 06:53 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , , , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

Celebrate Your Dad and Win $100!

Clickinks.com is giving you a chance to win $100 towards ink, toner or other office supplies of your choice!

Father’s Day has been celebrated throughout the US, Canada, UK and beyond for over 100 years. This year, Father’s Day falls on June 19th, and I highly recommend that you honor Dad on this day.

Celebrate the Father in your life by submitting a photo on our Facebook page or via Twitter using the hashtag #CelebrateDad

All entries need to be in by June 20, 2011, when the finalists will be posted on our Facebook page. The finalists’ photo that gets the most “Likes” will win $100 to use at Clickinks.com.

Terms & Conditions

*The Clickinks.com panel of judges will select finalists and post them on our Facebook page to face the public vote.

* Final voting on the Facebook page will end on June 24, 2011 and the votes will be counted by the Clickinks.com panel of judges and the winner announced.

* Open to residents of US only.

3D Printing To Provide Custom Manufacturing

11. April 2011 06:00 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)









Have you heard the buzz on 3D Printing?  Maybe you read about the evolution of printing devices lately. More and more 3D printers are coming out on the market, and are ingenious for "printing", or manufacturing, a wide variety of products.  With 3D printing you can mass produce custom or personalized products without incurring a significant price increase.  We are talking about significantly lowering the cost and risk of manufacturing, transforming many sectors of the manufacturing industry. 

Many more sectors are able to utilize 3D printing as we progress; new materials like stainless steel, glass, and in the last month, silver are added to the Shapeways line, an online marketplace offering personalized production via 3D printers spun out of of Royal Philips Electronics.  Looking for more fun? FigurePrints, a Seattle company, makes 3D replicas of Xbox Live avatars and World of Warcraft characters.  Larger manufacturers are also coming on board, including Clark’s, the British shoe brand, which this month began using Z Corp’s 3D printers for prototyping.  More than 20% of the output from 3D printers is actually final products, according to Terry Wohlers, who runs a research firm specializing in the field, and this number is sure to grow substantially.  3D printing is also used for quite remarkable production, like medical implants that are more likely to stay put than conventional ones. 

One day I am sure you will own something manufactured by a 3D printer, whether it is a custom made shoe, a replica of your avatar, or a femur implant.

Top 5 ways to Save at Clickinks.com

1. April 2011 06:00 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)
  1. In case you missed our big announcement earlier this month, you can now use eBillme to pay for your orders from Clickinks.com.  eBillme is safe, all you have to do is pay using your bank's online bill pay service.  If you pay your utility bill online, eBillme works the same way.  The best part about eBillme is that you can earn 10% Cash Back with Every Purchase, on top of our other Discounts!
  2. The more ink you buy with ClickInks.com, the more loyalty points you will automatically earn, and the more you save. Every purchase earns loyalty points, you can redeem these points for money off your next purchase, or save them up for a big spend.  Loyalty points can be applied to anything from ink cartridges to starburst candy!
  3. The best known way to save at Clickinks.com is probably our remanufactured cartridges.  Although we do offer OEM cartridges, our own professionally remanufactured cartridges available at up to an 86% savings!
  4. Free Shipping. The gas prices are so high, it is not worth driving around for the best deal anymore.  Place any $30 order and we will ship it free to any street address in the Contiguous US.
  5. Sign up for our exclusive weekly email newsletters or follow us on Facebook. We will provide you with a discount on Day 1, and periodically there after for additional savings.

Why Ink Cartridges Are So Expensive

Why Ink Cartridges Are So Expensive: The Truth Behind the Prices.
There are many speculations as to why ink cartridges for your printer are so expensive. Some reasons as to why the prices for ink cartridges are so high are due to technology research and development of ink as well as the ink cartridge and the materials used. Others are just opinions of consumers thinking the manufacturer gods want your yearly monetary sacrifices to calm the belly of the ink beast. But what is the truth behind the price?
Well unfortunately, both sides of the story are true, excluding the existence of Ink gods and there being a hungry ink beast waiting to consume your hard earned money. The reality is that quality standards and production costs are certainly a part of the price. The biggest factors playing a role in the high cost of printer ink involves both the containers that hold and dispense ink to printers and the formulated ink used to complete the printing process. I guess it is true what they say, you get what you pay for, but in this case, you definitely pay for research and development, the increase in technology to earn another award and further recognition from Technology Today on the new company development to continue to charge you more and fuel the train to continue the process all over again. Personally I feel as though some of these manufacturers should give stock options with each purchase.


The final price, after all considerations are made, come from the combination of materials spent to produce the product and the intricate technological process of printing designed to create the desired image and quality. To better summarize, the growth of modern day technology equals the growth in price. Take HP for example, early state-of-the-art printer models had about 12 nozzles in the print head and fired droplets at a rate of 10,000 per second. The technology in today's Photosmart 8250 uses 3,900 nozzles to deliver 122 million drops per second onto the paper. The reason for the improvements is simple, the more nozzles used, the smaller the dot size that can be produced in a single print, the smaller the dot size in the print, the higher the visibility and quality of the image being printed.

In addition to the increase of nozzles in the print head, so comes the increase in the technology of the ink. Thom Brown, marketing manager at Hewlett Packard, says HP spends about $1 billion a year on ink research and development (The total revenue for the printing division was $24 billion last year). Inks must be formulated to withstand heating to 300 degrees, vaporization, and being squirted at 30 miles per hour, at a rate of 36,000 drops per second, through multiple nozzles one third the size of a human hair. After all that, the ink must then dry almost instantly on the paper. This actually entails quite a bit of research for a single ink cartridge. Some manufacturers, like HP, have included the print head as part of the cartridge. The precision parts required generally make the cartridges more expensive, but the printers are cheaper since they don't include the precision print head. Other cartridges, like Kodak, do not include the print head and so can cost less, though the printers tend to be somewhat more expensive.

No matter what model printer you buy, ink prices are high. The most affordable printing solution we have found is to use remanufactured cartridges. Remanufactured cartridges include the print head, micro chip and anything else your cartridge may include, and are professionally remanufactured and refilled at or above manufacturer’s standards.

Earn Cash Back Now at Clickinks.com

15. February 2011 06:00 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

We are excited to introduce a new payment option at Clickinks.com

Have you ever wanted to shop online without a credit card, or worried about identity theft, fraud or debt? And on top of that, would you like to earn money while you shop?

Well you can - if you pay with eBillme when you shop at Clickinks.com. eBillme is a secure cash payment option which allows consumers to shop online without a credit card, and pay cash using online banking.

eBillme is free to use, has no sign-up, and every eBillme purchase includes the same benefits you typically get with premium credit cards, such as free buyer protection, a best price guarantee, and cash back rewards.  And with eBillme, you never need to enter a credit card number.

Simply shop at Clickinks.com, and pay for your purchase at your bank (eBillme is available at  17,000+ financial institutions that offers online bill pay), or at over 75,000 walk-in locations including WalMart, CVS, 7-Eleven and more.

From now until March 31, 2011 - when you shop at Clickinks.com and checkout using eBillme you will earn 10% cash back on every purchase, on top of our already low prices!  And this deal gets sweeter, on Tuesday and Thursday, you can double your cash back, which means your purchases will earn you up to 20% cash back!

So go ahead, shop at Clickinks.com and earn cash back with every order.

Ink Saving Fonts









 

Did you know that different fonts use differing amounts of ink to create the same characters? The examples listed above are all the same size and none of them have been set to bold. It becomes very obvious when you look at the examples side by side. This very text you are reading is in the Times New Roman font. You would potentially use less printer ink by selecting Calibri as opposed to Broadway or Bauhaus 93. A monetary savings in the thousands could be possible for larger organizations. The University of Wisconsin Green Bay has asked users to switch to Century Gothic for all printed documents. They have also switched their campus wide e-mail to Century Gothic. "The feedback we've gotten so far has been positive…Century Gothic is very readable." The school of 6,500 students was spending about $100,000 per year on ink and toner cartridges.

Recently a popular website tested different fonts for their ink-friendly ways, and Century Gothic and Times New Roman came out on top. Century Gothic uses approximately thirty percent less ink than Arial. The amounts of ink used are generally determined by the thickness of the lines. A font with ‘light’ or ‘narrow’ in its name generally uses less ink that its ‘bold’ counterpart said Thom Brown, an ink researcher with Hewlett Packard. Additionally, serif fonts, those with short horizontal strokes at the top and bottom of the characters, tend to use thinner lines and therefore less ink than a sans serif counterpart.

Now here is where things get a little confusing and not so cut and dry. While changing fonts may help you use less ink and buy fewer ink cartridges, it’s not necessarily the best decision for the environment. That’s because some fonts that use less ink are also wider. A document that’s approximately one page in length in the Arial font could possibly extend onto a second page when printed with Century Gothic. UW-Green Bay said research suggests that the monetary cost of ink is the main cost of a printout. The environmental cost of the additional paper used when printing with these reduced ink fonts is higher. Maybe the individual characters use less ink, but if you're using more paper, that's not so green, is it?

Other tips for reducing printing costs includes printing in ‘draft mode’ whenever possible and re-use and print on both sides of a piece of paper for those drafts. Always use print preview to eliminate wasting pages on useless text, like unwanted images and copyright lines. The use of an ink saving font is just another technique when you’re trying to consider the environmental impact of your printing habits.

So what is the best way to save on printing costs and help the environment? Simple, buy your ink and toner from http://www.clickinks.com/. The use of remanufactured ink cartridges helps to reduce the number of empty cartridges that are disposed of into landfills. Our high quality, low cost remanufactured cartridges are great for both the environment and your bottom line.