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Internal Debate between Computer and Printer

15. January 2013 15:36 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

Do you ever feel like getting something printed is a fight? Maybe, it actually is.  Do you think your computer and printer have these discussions?   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internal Debate
by Streeter Seidell at Collegehumor.com

Computer: Monitor, display this document, ok?
 
Monitor: No prob, boss.

Computer: OK, now it looks like Mouse is moving around so, Monitor, will you move the pointer icon accordingly?
 
Monitor: Anything you ask, boss.
 
Computer: Great, great. OK, Mouse, where are you going now?
 
Mouse: Over to the icon panel, sir.

Computer: Hmm, Let me know if he clicks anything, OK?
 
Mouse: Of course.

Keyboard: Sir, he's pressed control and P simultaneously.

Monitor: Oh God, here we go.

Computer: i>sighs Printer, are you there?
 
Printer: No.
 
Computer: Please, Printer. I know you're there.

Printer: NO! I'm not here! Leave me alone!
 
Computer: Jesus. OK look, you really ne…
 
Mouse: Sir, he's clicked on the printer icon.

Computer: Printer, now you have to print it twice.

Printer: NO! NO! NO! I don't want to! I hate you! I hate printing! I'm turning off!

Computer: Printer, you know you can't turn yourself off. Just print the document twice and we'll leave you alone.

Printer: NO! That's what you always say! I hate you! I'm out of ink!

Computer: You're not out of in…
 
Printer: I'M OUT OF INK!

Computer: span style="font-style: italic;">Sighs Monitor, please show a low ink level alert.
 
Monitor: But sir, he has plen…
 
Computer: Just do it, damn it!

Monitor: Yes sir.

Keyboard: AHHH! He's hitting me!

Computer: Stay calm, he'll stop soon. Stay calm, old friend.

Keyboard: He's pressing everything. Oh god, I don't know, he's just pressing everything!
 
Computer: PRINTER! Are you happy now?! Do you see what you've done?!
 
Printer: HA! that's what you get for trying to get me to do work. Next time he…hey…HEY! He's trying to open me! HELP! HELP! Oh my god! He's torn out my cartridge! HELP! Please! ERROR!

Monitor: Sir, maybe we should help him?
 
Computer: No. He did this to himself.

 

MICR toner, What is it and Do you need it

Have you seen or wondered what MICR toner means? What are the benefits of a MICR laser system? Should you be using MICR toner for your business or accounting needs? And what MICR toner cartridges are available?

  

 MICR is a Magnetic Ink Character Recognition technology used primarily by the banking industry to facilitate the processing of checks.  MICR characters are printed in special fonts with a magnetic toner containing iron oxide. As a machine decodes the MICR text, it first magnetizes the characters, and then the characters are passed over a MICR head, a device similar to the playback head of a tape recorder.  As each character passes over the head it produces a unique form that can be easily identified by the system.  Banks and Institutions rely on this MICR technology to read the account numbers and other codes in the bank line on checks and other negotiable documents with electronic bank processing equipment.

  

Most users cite the following benefits as a reason for converting to MICR printing:

  • MICR Laser check processing provides a much higher level of security.
  • Cost reductions by eliminating pre-printed checks
  • Creating a MICR Laser check is a single step process that adds payee data, signatures, logos, bank identification, and the MICR line to the check.
  • Increased flexibility to add, change or delete new bank accounts on demand, without ordering new checks.
  • Decreased exposure to check fraud.

So if you are in banking, accounting, payroll or accounts payable or are printing checks, you should use nothing less than MICR toner.  Clickinks MICR remanufactured laser toner cartridges guarantee that all checks are printed properly and will clear the financial institutions check clearing systems, adhering to ANSI readability standards.

 

Clickinks.com offers the best value, quality and price on MICR toner cartridges for all your check printing needs. We offer MICR toner for Canon, Dell, HP, Lexmark, IBM, Samsung, Toshiba, Xerox and even Source Tech printers, with more brands to come.  

How Does a Printer Work

No matter what type of document you are printing, whether if it’s a letter, spreadsheet, PDF or a photo, and no matter what type of printer you are using there are some similarities in how your printer works. The software is responsible for sending the data to the printer; this software is known as the driver. The driver translates the data from the application into a format that the printer understands, the driver also checks to see if the printer is connected, turned on, and functioning properly.  There are two major types of printers, the laser printer and the inkjet printer.

How a Laser Printer works:

For the laser printer there is a basic principle which is static electricity. A revolving drum which is known as a photoreceptor which is made out of conductive materials that sends light photons, as it revolves it receives an electrical charge from a wire that is called a charge corona, while it spins a tiny laser beam shines across it surface to discharge at various points to create the image on the drum.

Once the image is set, the printer puts a positively charged toner on the drum. The toner then will only stick to the negatively charged areas.

After the toner is adhered to the image on the drum, the paper is moved into position. The paper encounters the transfer of the corona wire and receives a negative charge. The negatively charged paper has a stronger pull than the static electric charged toner that is holding to the drum, the paper pulls the toner powder from the drum transferring the image to the paper once the image is transferred from the drum; a detac corona wire zaps the paper to remove it from the drum.

Finally the paper is ready for the fuser. The fuser permanently bonds the image into the paper. The paper passes threw the fusers which are just heated rollers.  As the paper passes threw the fuser heats up the toner powder and bonds it with the paper, then the fusers sends the paper out of the printer.

How an Inkjet Printer works:

For the inkjet printer, it uses miniscule droplets of ink to create the image. The ink comes from an ink cartridge that is placed in the print head assembly, inside the print head assembly there is actual print head which has several nozzles that spray drops of ink. An Inkjet printer also contain a print head stepper motor which a mechanism that moves the print head across the paper.
There are two types of inkjet printers:

Bubble Jet Printer:  The resistors create heat, which the heat vaporizes the ink into tiny little bubbles and the bubble is pushed out onto the paper. The bubble jet print head can contain 600 nozzles and they all can fire a drop of ink simultaneously.

Piezoelectric printer: Piezo crystal is found at the back of the ink reservoir which vibrates when it receives an electric charge. The vibration from the crystal will force the ink out of the nozzle.

This is a quick and simplistic view on how the most common printers work.  Do you have questions on your printer? Just let us know!

Pressing Forward: The Evolution of Printing Devices

9. February 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

What would Johannes Gutenberg think of today’s modern laser printer? Would he even recognize it as an evolution of his invention that changed the world? Most historians believe that the printing press was the single most important invention of the Middle Ages. Gutenberg conceived the idea of a movable type and the first printing press. It should be noted that the printing press is not the result of a single invention, it is the aggregation of three different technologies that were in existence centuries before Gutenberg was born.


• The adaptation for printing of the wine or olive oil screw-type press that had been in use for hundreds of years, throughout Europe and Asia.

• The adaptation of block print technology, known in Europe since the return of Marco Polo from Asia at the end of the 13th century.

• The development of mass production paper making techniques. Paper was brought from China to Italy in the 12th century, but was thought too flimsy for books.

The first few books to be printed and sold at print shops were religious texts and bibles. There was very little to no printing of new ideas taking place. Most people entered the printing business and then quickly left it. The main reason was the distribution of books was not organized. The potential for improvement was there, the market was there, and the demand was definitely there, but the control and transport were poorly organized. To add to this, the literacy rate in Europe was still very low. Most people did not even know how to read. However, this situation was improved by the Frankfort Fair, which was a center for printing and drew hundreds of booksellers, scholars, publishers and collectors from all over the world.

Printing encouraged literacy amongst the population and eventually brought about a deep and lasting impact on many people’s lives. The majority of the first books made by hand were typically the Bible. The print shop on the other hand, responded to demand with medical, travel and practical manuals. Printing also provided a platform for scholars and prevented the corruption of their texts during hand copying. By giving everyone the same texts to work from, the printing press had brought about progress in science and scholarship in a faster and more reliable way.

The main effects of the printing press however, was to multiply the supply and cut down the costs of books. Thus, it made information of all kinds readily available to larger segment of the population. Libraries were then able to store more information, and at a lower cost. The printing press also facilitated the preservation and dissemination of knowledge. This was very important for the advancement of science and technology. The printing press certainly fueled the start of the ‘information revolution’, which is on par with the Internet of today. The printing press allowed the spread of new ideas and information quickly, and with much greater impact.

Initial success with automatic printing was found with the steam printing presses of the early 1800's. This was the next major step for the printing industry. Gutenberg's original design had remained largely unchanged until then. The steam press, constructed of cast iron, allowed double the print size and required 90% less force to print properly. It could produce 250 prints an hour, an amazing feat for the era. Compare that to today's fully automated digital printing presses, which are capable of handling any color, font and print size at a printing rate that makes the steam press look like a snail.

So in the span of five centuries, we have witnessed human expression evolve from the spoken word, to the hand written word, to printed word. Now with today’s electronic mediums, our communication has evolved to what has become the digital information age. The internet’s effect on communication is causing us to rethink text itself. It has almost come full circle and returned to a state much like it was in its infancy of the spoken word. I am confident that if Johannes Gutenberg were alive today and needed toner for his laser printer, he would web-surf over to ClickInks.com. With the purchase of Clickinks remanufactured printer cartridges, you help reduce the amount of cartridges that are disposed of into landfills and save yourself money at the same time!

Ink Saving Fonts









 

Did you know that different fonts use differing amounts of ink to create the same characters? The examples listed above are all the same size and none of them have been set to bold. It becomes very obvious when you look at the examples side by side. This very text you are reading is in the Times New Roman font. You would potentially use less printer ink by selecting Calibri as opposed to Broadway or Bauhaus 93. A monetary savings in the thousands could be possible for larger organizations. The University of Wisconsin Green Bay has asked users to switch to Century Gothic for all printed documents. They have also switched their campus wide e-mail to Century Gothic. "The feedback we've gotten so far has been positive…Century Gothic is very readable." The school of 6,500 students was spending about $100,000 per year on ink and toner cartridges.

Recently a popular website tested different fonts for their ink-friendly ways, and Century Gothic and Times New Roman came out on top. Century Gothic uses approximately thirty percent less ink than Arial. The amounts of ink used are generally determined by the thickness of the lines. A font with ‘light’ or ‘narrow’ in its name generally uses less ink that its ‘bold’ counterpart said Thom Brown, an ink researcher with Hewlett Packard. Additionally, serif fonts, those with short horizontal strokes at the top and bottom of the characters, tend to use thinner lines and therefore less ink than a sans serif counterpart.

Now here is where things get a little confusing and not so cut and dry. While changing fonts may help you use less ink and buy fewer ink cartridges, it’s not necessarily the best decision for the environment. That’s because some fonts that use less ink are also wider. A document that’s approximately one page in length in the Arial font could possibly extend onto a second page when printed with Century Gothic. UW-Green Bay said research suggests that the monetary cost of ink is the main cost of a printout. The environmental cost of the additional paper used when printing with these reduced ink fonts is higher. Maybe the individual characters use less ink, but if you're using more paper, that's not so green, is it?

Other tips for reducing printing costs includes printing in ‘draft mode’ whenever possible and re-use and print on both sides of a piece of paper for those drafts. Always use print preview to eliminate wasting pages on useless text, like unwanted images and copyright lines. The use of an ink saving font is just another technique when you’re trying to consider the environmental impact of your printing habits.

So what is the best way to save on printing costs and help the environment? Simple, buy your ink and toner from http://www.clickinks.com/. The use of remanufactured ink cartridges helps to reduce the number of empty cartridges that are disposed of into landfills. Our high quality, low cost remanufactured cartridges are great for both the environment and your bottom line.