The Clickinks Blog | All posts tagged 'inks'

How to save on printing

We are all trying to save money these days, so here are some of our best tips on how to cut your printing costs in half by taking simple steps like shopping around for the best price, emailing your documents instead of printing them out and using duplex printing.

Don’t spend too much on ink

You can shop around and compare prices on printer ink. You will usually find the best prices, discounts and widest selection on-line. Remanufactured ink and toner cartridges are the best price at the highest quality, you will find remanufactured cartridges less than half the price of OEM while performing better than refilled or compatible cartridges.  Clickinks.com is known for low priced remanufactured ink and toner cartridges.

Print in economy mode

Next thing is changing your printing preference; how is this going help me save on my printing cost? By changing your printing preferences to print fit to page, change your current resolution to 300 DPI, change you toner saver on, set to economy mode and change your printing settings to text or even draft instead of photo. Once you have changed your printer preferences then go to print preview to make sure you are printing only what you need instead of printing headers, footers and anything else unnecessary.

Duplex Printing

If your printer has a duplex option, you can print on both the front and back of paper.  Many office printers even have the option of automatic duplexing.  This will cut your paper costs in half. 

Consider your Font

Switching to Calibri, Times New Roman or another narrow font and not using bold effects also means that you use less ink with each letter you print.  For more information on Ink Saving Fonts, see our earlier blog.

Email your documents

Are you sharing documents with other co workers? Everything doesn’t need to be printed, many times you can send them by email instead of printing them out, saving time, money, ink and the trees. Only print out what you need, for example let’s say that you have a memo or announcement you can just print the document once and then post it up somewhere everyone can see.

When you aim to save money, you end up spending less on ink or toner, putting less strain on your printer so it lasts longer, saving trees and keeping empty ink cartridges out of the environment.

What is ink

28. June 2011 08:00 by Danielle in   //  Tags: , , , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

What is ink?

Ink according to the Oxford Dictionary is: “a colored fluid used for writing, drawing, printing, or duplicating.”  According to Wikipedia: “Ink is a liquid or paste that contains pigments and/or dyes and is used to color a surface to produce an image, text, or design.”  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia defines it as a “Fluid or paste of various colors (usually black or dark blue) used for writing and printing, composed of a pigment or dye in a liquid vehicle (solvent).”  No matter where you look for a definition, all of them have something in common; the purpose of ink is to deliver a visual image.  Inks are found in almost every aspect of human activity.

The first inks used were made of fruit or vegetables juices; blood from some types of animals and bark from trees.  The first man made inks were made from animal or vegetable charcoal mixed with glue and it appeared in Egypt about 4,500 years ago.  Older style writing inks, such as in fountain pens, use a fluid water-based dye system. But in the 1950s, when ballpoint pens became fashionable, the writing ink industry shifted to paste like oil-based dye systems. The thick consistency allows capillary action to keep the ink flowing well, and the inks generally are no smearing and quicker drying than water-based systems.  Dyes tend to be preferred over pigments for writing inks because pigments can't be dispersed minutely enough and tend to clog the pen tip. Water-based dye or pigment systems are still used for markers, highlighters and rollerball pens. A few pen manufacturers, such as Bic (which sells about 3 million pens per day) make their own ink, but most pen manufacturers buy their ink.

There are various types of inks available today, all used for different purposes in the printing market.  Newspapers, magazines, photo and book publishers are just a few examples of the paper base industries that use inks in a daily basis.  Even the governments use ink to print money.  But there are a lot more industries that depend on inks to deliver a message; apparel, beverage and paint industries are some good examples.  In today’s developed nations, most residences and businesses have a printing capability and having an inkjet printer is very common in most countries.  At home ink is used to print homework, reports, bills or just to print some drawings to keep the kids busy doing some coloring (I’m guilty as charged). 

Today's inks are divided into two classes: printing inks and writing inks. Printing inks are further broken down into two subclasses: ink for conventional printing, and ink for digital nonimpact printing, which includes ink-jet and electrophotographic technologies.  Inks also contain additives such as waxes, lubricants, surfactants, and drying agents to aid printing and to impart any desired special characteristics.  An average size magazine issue of 80 pages requires a total of only about 68 gal of ink to print just more than 150,000 copies.  The advent of personal computers, personal electronics, and the Internet may one day replace libraries full of printed books and periodicals with electronic products.  Look how many e-books are already in use. But the great paperless society hasn't fully shown itself yet, many industries still rely on paper. And as long as there's paper, then there must be ink.

How Does a Printer Work

No matter what type of document you are printing, whether if it’s a letter, spreadsheet, PDF or a photo, and no matter what type of printer you are using there are some similarities in how your printer works. The software is responsible for sending the data to the printer; this software is known as the driver. The driver translates the data from the application into a format that the printer understands, the driver also checks to see if the printer is connected, turned on, and functioning properly.  There are two major types of printers, the laser printer and the inkjet printer.

How a Laser Printer works:

For the laser printer there is a basic principle which is static electricity. A revolving drum which is known as a photoreceptor which is made out of conductive materials that sends light photons, as it revolves it receives an electrical charge from a wire that is called a charge corona, while it spins a tiny laser beam shines across it surface to discharge at various points to create the image on the drum.

Once the image is set, the printer puts a positively charged toner on the drum. The toner then will only stick to the negatively charged areas.

After the toner is adhered to the image on the drum, the paper is moved into position. The paper encounters the transfer of the corona wire and receives a negative charge. The negatively charged paper has a stronger pull than the static electric charged toner that is holding to the drum, the paper pulls the toner powder from the drum transferring the image to the paper once the image is transferred from the drum; a detac corona wire zaps the paper to remove it from the drum.

Finally the paper is ready for the fuser. The fuser permanently bonds the image into the paper. The paper passes threw the fusers which are just heated rollers.  As the paper passes threw the fuser heats up the toner powder and bonds it with the paper, then the fusers sends the paper out of the printer.

How an Inkjet Printer works:

For the inkjet printer, it uses miniscule droplets of ink to create the image. The ink comes from an ink cartridge that is placed in the print head assembly, inside the print head assembly there is actual print head which has several nozzles that spray drops of ink. An Inkjet printer also contain a print head stepper motor which a mechanism that moves the print head across the paper.
There are two types of inkjet printers:

Bubble Jet Printer:  The resistors create heat, which the heat vaporizes the ink into tiny little bubbles and the bubble is pushed out onto the paper. The bubble jet print head can contain 600 nozzles and they all can fire a drop of ink simultaneously.

Piezoelectric printer: Piezo crystal is found at the back of the ink reservoir which vibrates when it receives an electric charge. The vibration from the crystal will force the ink out of the nozzle.

This is a quick and simplistic view on how the most common printers work.  Do you have questions on your printer? Just let us know!

Modernist Cuisine Weighs in at over 4 lbs of ink

25. February 2011 06:00 by Josh in   //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments (0)

We are going off script here today with something a little different. While this might be considered a book review, I look at it as a tribute to modern printing and publishing. This is what can happen when money, imagination and curiosity collide. With a release date of March 7th, Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking might be the most highly anticipated book of this millennium.

Modernist Cuisine is a six-volume, 47-pound epic collection (list price $625) that could easily pass for a graduate level science text, dispelling many of the myths that exist in the food world. Its release has been delayed for months because the one of a kind Plexiglas case that houses the volumes was cracking and breaking under the astonishing weight. The ink used to print the text and pictures weighs in at over 4 pounds; that’s more than the average book weighs, paper and all.

“Every one of the traditional publishers balked at the scope of this project,” says Dr. Nathan Myhrvold, the multi-millionaire author and inventor, “which is why I had to found my own publishing company to get it done.” Fortunately, he was the former Chief Technology Officer of Microsoft and the current CEO of Intellectual Ventures, a 5 billion dollar patent portfolio development company. Myhrvold had the resources to bankroll his own publishing company, which he named The Cooking Lab.

A comprehensive, well-researched book is one thing, but what's the appeal for the everyday home cook? Simply, this is the most useful cookbook you'll probably never cook from. Oddly enough, that does not make the books inaccessible. There might not be a recipe you will make in every chapter, but there is something to inspire and learn from on every single page.

With its sizeable price tag, the book may not be for most, but Myhrvold insists there is something for everyone. “Chefs will certainly be interested," he said. "The book contains a lot of techniques that it would be really difficult to learn any other way. You would have to work at a dozen different restaurants around the world." It's also appealing to those with an "intellectual curiosity," claims Myhrvold. "People who love books say this is really an extraordinary object."

This release is going to be a turning point as to how people think about food and technology. If Myhrvold would have added a chapter or two about football, that would cover just about everything that interests me. I’ve already started printing excerpts I’ve found online, but I’ve used up my black inkjet cartridge. I’m not going to find all 2,438 pages online, nor would I want that many loose pages in my kitchen, so I’m going to have to stop soon. The good thing is that I know that I can save up to 86% by buying remanufactured inks from Clickinks.com. So now you know what to get me for my birthday, it’s in June if you were wondering. It’s your pick, inkjet cartridges from Clickinks or Modernist Cuisine, I’ll take either one.

Ink Saving Fonts









 

Did you know that different fonts use differing amounts of ink to create the same characters? The examples listed above are all the same size and none of them have been set to bold. It becomes very obvious when you look at the examples side by side. This very text you are reading is in the Times New Roman font. You would potentially use less printer ink by selecting Calibri as opposed to Broadway or Bauhaus 93. A monetary savings in the thousands could be possible for larger organizations. The University of Wisconsin Green Bay has asked users to switch to Century Gothic for all printed documents. They have also switched their campus wide e-mail to Century Gothic. "The feedback we've gotten so far has been positive…Century Gothic is very readable." The school of 6,500 students was spending about $100,000 per year on ink and toner cartridges.

Recently a popular website tested different fonts for their ink-friendly ways, and Century Gothic and Times New Roman came out on top. Century Gothic uses approximately thirty percent less ink than Arial. The amounts of ink used are generally determined by the thickness of the lines. A font with ‘light’ or ‘narrow’ in its name generally uses less ink that its ‘bold’ counterpart said Thom Brown, an ink researcher with Hewlett Packard. Additionally, serif fonts, those with short horizontal strokes at the top and bottom of the characters, tend to use thinner lines and therefore less ink than a sans serif counterpart.

Now here is where things get a little confusing and not so cut and dry. While changing fonts may help you use less ink and buy fewer ink cartridges, it’s not necessarily the best decision for the environment. That’s because some fonts that use less ink are also wider. A document that’s approximately one page in length in the Arial font could possibly extend onto a second page when printed with Century Gothic. UW-Green Bay said research suggests that the monetary cost of ink is the main cost of a printout. The environmental cost of the additional paper used when printing with these reduced ink fonts is higher. Maybe the individual characters use less ink, but if you're using more paper, that's not so green, is it?

Other tips for reducing printing costs includes printing in ‘draft mode’ whenever possible and re-use and print on both sides of a piece of paper for those drafts. Always use print preview to eliminate wasting pages on useless text, like unwanted images and copyright lines. The use of an ink saving font is just another technique when you’re trying to consider the environmental impact of your printing habits.

So what is the best way to save on printing costs and help the environment? Simple, buy your ink and toner from http://www.clickinks.com/. The use of remanufactured ink cartridges helps to reduce the number of empty cartridges that are disposed of into landfills. Our high quality, low cost remanufactured cartridges are great for both the environment and your bottom line.